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When I think of HACK WILSON

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  • hellborn
    replied
    Originally posted by Honus Wagner Rules
    Bill James had a great write up about Hack Wilson in his Managers book. He was contrasting the different managing styles of John McGraw and Joe McCarthy. mcGraw had Wilson and he couldn't do anything with him. The Giants "lost" Wilson in some short of draft mixup. McGraw blamed the Giants front office. Anyway, under McCarthy, Wilson blossomed. According to James, McCarthy realized that Wilson had somewhat of an inferiority complex and McCarthy would contantly encourage and pump Wilson up. The moment McCarthy left the Cubs Wilson went down hill. I'm sure his drinking was part as that as well. I'll dig out James book and post the article.
    Hack and Hornsby, McCarthy's replacement, passionately hated each other. The recent Hornsby biography has a great shot of the two supposedly shaking hands and making up, but the men are clearly not looking each other in the eye at all.
    I'll have to make a copy of that one!

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  • hellborn
    replied
    Originally posted by Honus Wagner Rules
    I didn't know Wilson had a biography. I'll check it out!
    I consider that a must read...after I clear out my present backlog of books. Unfortunately, it is usually the sad stories that are the most interesting, so I think that Hack's life should be a good read.

    Leave a comment:


  • Honus Wagner Rules
    replied
    Originally posted by blackout805
    Lewis

    Hack Wilson's biography "Fouled Away" is a good book
    I didn't know Wilson had a biography. I'll check it out!
    Last edited by Honus Wagner Rules; 02-21-2006, 04:23 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • hellborn
    replied
    Originally posted by Sultan_1895-1948
    Love that worm logic

    Do you have that picture on your computer? Can you get it scanned? Gotta see it brotha !!
    I have a pretty low resolution version at home...but, here it is with decent resolution...
    http://z.lee28.tripod.com/sbnslegends/id2.html .
    One of the best batting photos I've ever seen...can't say much for the head discipline, but it exemplifies what Mantle said about Splinter's batting style...he wasn't playing pattycake, he was trying to destroy the ball!

    BTW, I've been playing with my swing at home, trying to add some elements from your sequence of Ruth taking a cut. Especially the push off the rear heel...my right toes are pretty numb due to nerve damage from a burst disk, so I think that pushing off my heel might help. I'm encouraged by the results so far! Only for slow pitch, though...I don't think that I could hit a baseball with that long a stride and that extreme a hip rotation. I need to stay compact!

    Leave a comment:


  • Blackout
    replied
    Originally posted by Honus Wagner Rules
    Bill James had a great write up about Hack Wilson in his Managers book. He was contrasting the different managing styles of John McGraw and Joe McCarthy. mcGraw had Wilson and he couldn't do anything with him. The Giants "lost" Wilson in some short of draft mixup. McGraw blamed the Giants front office. Anyway, under McCarthy, Wilson blossomed. According to James, McCarthy realized that Wilson had somewhat of an inferiority complex and McCarthy would contantly encourage and pump Wilson up. The moment McCarthy left the Cubs Wilson went down hill. I'm sure his drinking was part as that as well. I'll dig out James book and post the article.

    How many here a BBF know Hack Wilson's first name without looking it up?!
    Lewis

    Hack Wilson's biography "Fouled Away" is a good book

    Leave a comment:


  • Wee Willie
    replied
    The 'Round Mound of RBI'

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  • Honus Wagner Rules
    replied
    Bill James had a great write up about Hack Wilson in his Managers book. He was contrasting the different managing styles of John McGraw and Joe McCarthy. mcGraw had Wilson and he couldn't do anything with him. The Giants "lost" Wilson in some short of draft mixup. McGraw blamed the Giants front office. Anyway, under McCarthy, Wilson blossomed. According to James, McCarthy realized that Wilson had somewhat of an inferiority complex and McCarthy would contantly encourage and pump Wilson up. The moment McCarthy left the Cubs Wilson went down hill. I'm sure his drinking was part as that as well. I'll dig out James book and post the article.

    How many here a BBF know Hack Wilson's first name without looking it up?!

    Leave a comment:


  • torez77
    replied
    Originally posted by SHOELESSJOE3
    When I think of Hack Wilson, I think of one of the funniest events that ever happened on the diamond. Where was TV when we needed it.

    In one game the Chicago Cub's pitcher was being pulled from the game by the Cub's manager. The pitcher was furious, did not want to come out and a long debate took place on the mound. Hack who was known to spend more than a few afternoons playing with a hang over laid down in the outfield. Finally the Cub pitcher left the mound but before leaving heaved the ball into the outfield. The ball banged against a metal sign on the wall with a clang. The noise startled Hank as he lay on the grass, eyes closed. Thinking a batter had hit the ball up against the wall, he sprang to his feet, chased down the ball and rifled a throw into the infield.

    Hack received a round of applause from some fans and the players from both teams.
    Thanks for the laugh! I never heard that one before.

    Leave a comment:


  • Sultan_1895-1948
    replied
    Originally posted by hellborn
    I think of the 191 RBI first...then, I think of the amazing photo that I use in my personal signature. Whatta cut! Can't you just hear Harry Caray saying, "He had a cut..."? I would love to see video of one of Hack's swings someday.
    I also think of the story about Joe McCarthy taking a worm and putting it in water, which didn't bother it, and then putting it in glass of alcohol, which killed it. Hack's conclusion was that he wouldn't get worms if he kept drinking.

    Finally, I think of the photo from "The Ultimate Baseball Book" featuring Hack (with the Dodgers) posing with Ruth and Gehrig...Wilson is smiling and seems pleased, but the Yankee boys are clearly none too happy to be posing with the little girlie-footed round guy. But, neither one of them ever reached 191 RBI!!!
    Love that worm logic

    Do you have that picture on your computer? Can you get it scanned? Gotta see it brotha !!

    Leave a comment:


  • hellborn
    replied
    I think of the 191 RBI first...then, I think of the amazing photo that I use in my personal signature. Whatta cut! Can't you just hear Harry Caray saying, "He had a cut..."? I would love to see video of one of Hack's swings someday.
    I also think of the story about Joe McCarthy taking a worm and putting it in water, which didn't bother it, and then putting it in glass of alcohol, which killed it. Hack's conclusion was that he wouldn't get worms if he kept drinking.

    Finally, I think of the photo from "The Ultimate Baseball Book" featuring Hack (with the Dodgers) posing with Ruth and Gehrig...Wilson is smiling and seems pleased, but the Yankee boys are clearly none too happy to be posing with the little girlie-footed round guy. But, neither one of them ever reached 191 RBI!!!

    Leave a comment:


  • SHOELESSJOE3
    replied
    When I think of Hack Wilson, I think of one of the funniest events that ever happened on the diamond. Where was TV when we needed it.

    In one game the Chicago Cub's pitcher was being pulled from the game by the Cub's manager. The pitcher was furious, did not want to come out and a long debate took place on the mound. Hack who was known to spend more than a few afternoons playing with a hang over laid down in the outfield. Finally the Cub pitcher left the mound but before leaving heaved the ball into the outfield. The ball banged against a metal sign on the wall with a clang. The noise startled Hank as he lay on the grass, eyes closed. Thinking a batter had hit the ball up against the wall, he sprang to his feet, chased down the ball and rifled a throw into the infield.

    Hack received a round of applause from some fans and the players from both teams.

    Leave a comment:


  • KCGHOST
    replied
    I think of the 191 rbi's and that 1931 may well have been the biggest drop-off season of anyone following a monster year.

    Leave a comment:


  • Bill Burgess
    replied
    Originally posted by E.Banks#14
    Was it 190 or 191 RBIs in 1930? I think I read that they (SABR or some other statisticians) went back and recounted and it came out to 191.
    Oops! It was 190 all my life, but now Total Baseball and Baseball-reference both list it as 191.

    I stand reproved.

    Bill Burgess

    Leave a comment:


  • E.Banks#14
    replied
    Originally posted by [email protected]
    Hack Wilson? I think of his epic 1930 season. 56 HRs, 190 RBIs. He also had a pretty good season in 1929, where he led the league again in homers.

    Bill
    Was it 190 or 191 RBIs in 1930? I think I read that they (SABR or some other statisticians) went back and recounted and it came out to 191.

    Leave a comment:


  • Bill Burgess
    replied
    Hack Wilson? I think of his epic 1930 season. 56 HRs, 190 RBIs. He also had a pretty good season in 1929, where he led the league again in homers.

    Slugging %
    1926-.539-2
    1927-.579-3
    1928-.588-4
    1929-.618-6
    1930-.723-1
    1932-.538-7
    Car-.545-30

    Runs1926-97-7
    1927-119-3
    1929-135-4
    1930-146-4

    Total Bases
    1926-285-3
    1927-319-3
    1928-306-7
    1929-355-4
    1930-423-2

    Home Runs
    1926-21-1
    1927-30-1
    1928-31-1
    1929-39-3
    1930-56-1
    1931-13-9
    1932-23-5


    RBI
    1926-109-2
    1927-129-2
    1928-120-3
    1929-159-1
    1930-191-1
    1932-123-4

    Bases on Balls
    1926-69-1
    1927-71-5
    1928-77-4
    1929-78-8
    1930-105-1
    1931-63-7
    1933-52-9

    Strikeouts
    1926-61-4
    1927-70-1
    1928-94-1
    1929-83-1
    1930-84-1
    1931-69-4
    1932-85-1
    1933-50-10


    Adjusted OPS+

    1926-151-3
    1927-160-2
    1928-158-3
    1929-155-5
    1930-178-1
    1932-141-8

    Leave a comment:

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