Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Oldest MLB Player Caligiuri Passes Away at age 100.

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Oldest MLB Player Caligiuri Passes Away at age 100.

    Former Philadelphia Athletics pitcher, and Oldest Major leaguer, Fred Caligiuri has just passed away at age 100. He was about 5 1/2 weeks beyond his 100th birthday. Caligiuri was a 1941 and 1942 Philly Athlettic. Catcher, Tom Jordan, (current age: 99 years, 90 days) becomes the oldest living big leaguer.. Jordan played sporadically in the big leagues, totaling only 39 games in the majors. He hit .240, with one career home run for the 1944 Chicago White Sox, 1946 White Sox and Cleveland Indians and 1948 St. Louis Browns.

  • #2
    Did his WWII service effect his ability to play ball again?
    "No matter how great you were once upon a time — the years go by, and men forget,” - W. A. Phelon in Baseball Magazine in 1915. “Ross Barnes, forty years ago, was as great as Cobb or Wagner ever dared to be. Had scores been kept then as now, he would have seemed incomparably marvelous.”

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by bluesky5 View Post
      Did his WWII service effect his ability to play ball again?
      I assume so. All returning veterans with MLB experience were offered 30 days on a major league roster (and 30 days pay) in additions to those on the 25 man roster in 1946 or in their first year back from the military (some in 1947) in about the only time in history that an unbalanced number of roster spots among teams was allowed. It was at the manager's discretion if they could be used in a regular season game. This is why you see a lot of players who played before the war, with just 1 to 5 games in the majors in 1946 and then that being their final major league experience. Caligiuri either didn't take the 30 days offer or he did was on a MLB roster for 30 days probably the A's, but in his manager's estimation his performance was no longer of MLB quality, so he was never used.
      Last edited by philliesfiend55; 12-11-2018, 08:12 AM.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by philliesfiend55 View Post

        I assume so. All returning veterans with MLB experience were offered 30 days on a major league roster (and 30 days pay) in additions to those on the 25 man roster in 1946 or in their first year back from the military (1947 etc.). It was at the manager's discretion if they could be used in a regular season game. This is why you see a lot of players who played before the war, with just 1 to 5 games in the majors in 1946 and then that being their final major league experience. Caligiuri either didn't take the 30 days offer or he did was on a MLB roster for 30 days probably the A's, but in his manager's estimation his performance was no longer of MLB quality, so he was never used.
        Wow, never knew that. Thanks man
        "No matter how great you were once upon a time — the years go by, and men forget,” - W. A. Phelon in Baseball Magazine in 1915. “Ross Barnes, forty years ago, was as great as Cobb or Wagner ever dared to be. Had scores been kept then as now, he would have seemed incomparably marvelous.”

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by philliesfiend55 View Post

          I assume so. All returning veterans with MLB experience were offered 30 days on a major league roster (and 30 days pay) in additions to those on the 25 man roster in 1946 or in their first year back from the military (1947 etc.). It was at the manager's discretion if they could be used in a regular season game. This is why you see a lot of players who played before the war, with just 1 to 5 games in the majors in 1946 and then that being their final major league experience. Caligiuri either didn't take the 30 days offer or he did was on a MLB roster for 30 days probably the A's, but in his manager's estimation his performance was no longer of MLB quality, so he was never used.
          Great to know! So sad that the pre-WWII era guys are gone. You wouldn't happen to know if any of the NeL players from prior to WWII are still around, do you?
          Since its that time of year
          Do they still play the blues in Chicago, when baseball season rolls around?
          When the snow melts away, do the Chi-Sox still play, in horribly named burial ground?


          Play the Who am I? game in trivia and you can make this signature line yours for 3 days (baseball signatures only!)

          Go here for a link to all player links! http://www.baseball-fever.com/forum/...player-threads

          Go here for all your 1920's/1930's OF info

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Toledo Inquisition View Post

            Great to know! So sad that the pre-WWII era guys are gone. You wouldn't happen to know if any of the NeL players from prior to WWII are still around, do you?
            Yes, that rule or allowance is an interesting detail isn't it! Hall of famers Ted Lyons, and Red Ruffing and first mlb all-star game ever, (1933) N.L. starting second baseman, Phillie Dick Bartell are among a long list of players/veterans whose career concluded after a very limited number of games played in 1946.
            Go to wikipedia.org and enter '100 oldest living major league players' for their Main List page of the 100 oldest (actually if you click EDIT at the top right of the main page there is a Supplementary Llist that also gives you players #s 101-125.)
            If you are looking to find which living players played the most seasons ago, then the answer is that there are 3 living players who played MLB in 1942 and then everybody else reached the majors later than that. They are # 3 Val Heim, #5 four-time American League all-star first baseman, Eddie Robinson (due to turn 98 this week: Dec. 15) and #11 George Yankowski.
            Last edited by philliesfiend55; 12-11-2018, 08:14 AM.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by bluesky5 View Post

              Wow, never knew that. Thanks man
              No problem at all - Glad to share!

              Comment


              • #8
                The death of any one of the 125 oldest living major leaguers would result in #126 - all-star, pirates pitcher, bob friend,88, being officially added to the list.

                SORRY! THAT POST WAS MEANT FOR A DIFFERENT TOPIC..
                Last edited by philliesfiend55; 12-11-2018, 05:39 PM.

                Comment

                Ad Widget

                Collapse
                Working...
                X