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Complete List Of 20 Game Losers since 1940.

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  • Complete List Of 20 Game Losers since 1940.

    There have been 52 Twenty Loss Pitchers' seasons since 1940. No one Reached the 25 Loss Season Mark. In 33 of these seasons the pitcher lost exactly 20 games. 19 of these seasons resulted in more than 20 losses on pitchers' records. There has been only one 20 loss season since 1980 when Mike Maroth lost 21, going 9-21 for the 2003 Detroit Tigers. Maroth is the last major leaguer and the last American Leaguer to lose 20 in a season. The last National Leaguer to lose 20 in a season is Hall Of Famer, Phil Niekro who went 21-20 in 1979. Niekro and Wilbur wood had the only above .500 seasons since 1940, while losing 20 games.
    The List includes 3 Hall Of Famers. and 7 pitchers with more than 200 Career Wins.
    Here is the list - In order of most games lost:
    *Hall Of Famer
    @ Pitcher Also lost 20 in a season before 1940.

    Pitcher - Year/Team - Year's W-L record - (Career Record) - In parenthesis.

    Jack Fisher 1965 New York Mets 8-24 (86-139).
    Roger Craig 1962 New York Mets 10-24 (74-98).
    Bill Bonham 1974 Chicago Cubs 11-22 (75-83).
    Art Ditmar 1956 Kansas City Athletics 12-22 (72-77).
    Randy Jones 1974 San Diego Padres 8-22 (100-123).
    *Robin Roberts 1957 Philadelphia Phillies 10-22 (286-245).
    Steve Rogers 1974 Montreal Expos 15-22 (158-152)
    Denny Mc Lain 1971 Washington Senators 10-22 (131-91)
    @Hugh Mulcahy 1940 Philadelphia Phillies 13-22 (45-89)..
    Steve Arlin 1972 San Diego Padres 10-21 (34-67).
    Stan Bahnsen 1973 Chicago White Sox 18-21 (146-149).
    Larry Jackson 1965 Chicago Cubs 14-21 (194-183).
    Mickey Lolich 1974 Detroit Tigers 16-21 (217-191).
    Lum Harris 1943 Philadelphia Athletics 7-21 (35-63).
    Fred Sanford 1948 St. Louis Browns 12-21 (37-55).
    Don Larsen 1954 Baltimore Orioles 3-21 (81-91).
    Jim Tobin 1942 Boston Braves 12-21 (105-112).
    Mike Maroth 2003 Detroit Tigers 9-21 (50-67).
    Murry Dickson 1952 Pittsburgh Pirates 14-21 (172-181).
    Murry Dickson 1954 Philadelphia Phillies 10-20 (172-181)
    Al Jackson 1962 New York Mets 8-20 (67-99).
    Al Jackson 1965 New York Mets 8-20 (67-99).
    Wilbur Wood 1973 Chicago White Sox 24-20 (164-156).
    Wilbur Wood 1975 Chicago White Sox 16-20 (164-156).
    Bobo Newsom 1941 Detroit Tigers 12-20 (211-222).
    Bobo Newsom 1945 Philadelphia Athletics 8-20 (211-222).
    *Phil Niekro 1977 Atlanta Braves 16-20 (318-274).
    *Phil Niekro 1979 Atlanta Braves 21-20 (318-274).
    Brian Kingman 1980 Oakland Athletics 8-20 (23-45).
    Harry Byrd 1953 Philadelphia Athletics 11-20 (46-54).
    Alex Kellner 1950 Philadelphia Athletics 8-20 (101-112).
    Dick Barrett 1945 Philadelphia Phillies 8-20 (35-58).
    Nate Andrews 1943 Boston Braves 14-20 (41-54).
    *Steve Carlton 1973 Philadelphia Phillies 13-20 (329-244).
    Dick Farrell 1962 Houston Colt 45s 10-20 (106-111).
    Glen Hobbie 1960 Chicago Cubs 16-20 (62-81).
    Art Houtteman 1952 Detroit Tigers 8-20 (87-91).
    Sam Jones 1955 S.t Louis Cardinals 14-20 (102-101).
    Clyde Wright 1974 Milwaukee Brewers 9-20 (100-111).
    Clay Kirby 1969 San Diego Padres 7-20 (75-104).
    Jerry Koosman 1977 New York Mets 8-20 (222-209).
    Rube Melton 1942 Pittsburgh Pirates 9-20 (30-50).
    Pedro Ramos 1961 Minnesota Twins 11-20 (117-160).
    Bob Rush 1950 Chicago Cubs 13-20 (127-152).
    Chuck Stobbs 1957 Washington Senators 8-20 (107-130).
    Orlando Pena 1963 Kansas City Athletics 12-20 (56-77).
    Eddie Smith 1942 Chicago White Sox 7-20 (73-113).
    Tracy Stallard 1964 New York Mets 10-20 (30-57).
    Bill Wight 1948 Chicago White Sox 9-20 (77-99).
    Luis Tiant 1969 Cleveland Indians 9-20 (229-172).
    Mel Stottlemyre 1966 New York Yankees 12-20 (164-139).
    Ken Raffensberger 1944 Philadelphia Phillies 13-20 (119-154).

    Sam Jones (MLB Career:1951-1964, 20 loss season in 1955 - two-time NL all-star and one-time 20 games winner (1959 SF Giants) 102-101 lifetime W-L record) just
    Like his more famous, namesake, Sad Sam Jones MLB Career: 1914-1935 had both 20 win and 20 loss seasons in the same career. The earlier Sam Jones, nicknamed 'Sad Sam' had an extremely long career (22 years), where he won 20 twice (1921 Red Sox and 1923 Yankees) and lost 20 once (1919 Red Sox). He was the type of player to paraphrase Enos slaughter, where "They'd have to rip the uniform off of, before they'd get him to retire". Sad Sam jones finished his career with 647 games pitched, 487 games started, 160 games relieved and a career won-loss record of 229-217.

    -1954 Phils-(Dennis Keith Orlandini)-
    Last edited by 1954 Phils; 11-08-2019, 04:11 AM.

  • #2
    This is an impressive list, 1954Phils. Consider how many of these pitchers are only two years away from pitching very well, or two years removed from doing so.

    Randy Jones, won 20 games or more in '75-'76 and a Cy in 1976. He might have won 20 again later in the decade if his team had scored for him.
    Don Larson, pitched his perfect game in the '56 WS.
    Steve Rogers, would pitch very effectively through the rest of the decade and into the '80s to compile the winning record you show.
    Mickey Lolich, had pitched as a staff ace in '71 and '72.
    Luis Tiant, would pitch as an ace for several years yet.
    Clay Kirby, would pitch very well in 1971 for a very bad team, 15-13 with AS stats across the board and a 4.2 WAR.
    Jerry Koosman, had won 21 games in '76 and would win 20 in '79.

    The ability had to be there in order to lose 20 games at all.
    Catfish Hunter, RIP. Mark Fidrych, RIP. Skip Caray, RIP. Tony Gwynn, #19, RIP

    A fanatic is someone who can't change his mind and won't change the subject. -- Winston Churchill. (Please take note that I've recently become aware of how this quote applies to a certain US president. This is a coincidence, and the quote was first added to this signature too far back to remember when).

    Experience is the hardest teacher. She gives the test first and the lesson later. -- Dan Quisenberry.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by abolishthedh View Post

      The ability had to be there in order to lose 20 games at all.
      That's right!! A bad pitcher would have a record something like 2-6 or 3-7. He wouldn't get the opportunity to lose 20 in a season. You have to be good to lose 20. You have to have your manager's confidence that you can do as good a job as anyone else on the pitching staff that the manager has available. Quite often, losing 20 is just a function of pitching for a bad team, who doesn't give the pitcher any run support ie. 1944 Phillies - Ken Raffensberger 13-20 for a last-place team. On a good team he might have finished his year at 19-14.
      As I pointed out in the opening paragraph of Post #1 of this thread, there are three Hall Of Famers on this list and seven 200 game winners. That's pretty good company.

      Comment

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