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  • Pitchers - Scott Sanderson (R/R), Allen Sothoron (B/R), Bobby Thigpen (R/R), Robb Nen (R/R)

    C - Gabby Hartnett (R/R)
    1b - Ripper Collins (B/B) [player-manager]
    2b - Orlando Merced (B/R)
    3b - Mark Reynolds (R/R)
    SS - Hugh Duffy (R/R)
    LF - Tommy Davis (R/R)
    CF - Jo-Jo Moore (L/R)
    RF - Gene Woodling (L/R)

    Lineup:

    Duffy, 6
    Woodling, 9
    Hartnett, 2
    Collins, 3
    Davis, 7
    Merced, 4
    Reynolds, 5
    Moore, 8
    Pitcher, 1

    Sanderson, strapping with good control, and Sotheron, a late-deadball spitball artist, are competent starting pitchers. Thigpen and Nen are a marvelous one-two out of the 'pen. Both throw live fastballs and vicious sliders; Nen adds a splitter, while Thiggy incorporates a curve and a straight change. The defense is a little jerry-rigged; both middle infielders Merced and Duffy are playing positions they didn't play really very often, but both were very versatile and could do it. Reynolds was definitely a third baseman, but an erratic one, and Tommy Davis had the range of a coat tree in left after that catastrophic broken leg. But Moore and Woodling are fully competent across the rest of the outfield, Hartnett was the best defensive catcher of his generation (well, him or Bill DIckey), and Collins is deft at first base. Ripper threw left-handed when playing first base and the outfield, but he could throw right-handed as well; there was talk about playing himi at third with a glove on his left hand, but the Cardinals ultimately didn't go through with it. New rule -- any position player who can throw with either hand is a strong candidate to manage!

    Duffy has the highest single season batting average of all time, two batting titles, and a career Triple Crown, Woodling is an AL OBP champ, Hartnett is a legendary Cub slugger, and Collins is a NL HR champion. Davis has two more batting titles and an RBI crown. Merced is an above-average switch hitter. Reynolds is an all-or-nothing TTO type who posted the highest single-season strikeout total of all time -- and three more of the top twenty. But, he also hit a home run in over 5% of his at-bats. Moore is a punchless but fleet center fielder who played several seasons in the 1930s for Detroit; he returned to MLB in the war seasons 1943 and 1944. Of the pitchers, Sothoron can hit a little.

    Comment


    • P/OF/2b - Charlie Ferguson (B/R)
      P - Jonathan Papelbon (R/R)
      C - Gus Triandos (R/R)
      1b/3b - Roger Connor (B/L)
      1b/OF/3b/2b - Pedro Guerrero (R/R)
      1b/DH/LF - Adam Lind (L/L)
      SS/2b/3b - Jose Vizcaino (B/R)
      LF/OF/1b - Sherry Magee (R/R)
      LF/RF/CF - Roy Johnson (L/R)
      CF/LF/RF - Jimmie Hall (L/R)
      CF - Benny Kauff (L/L)
      RF/OF - Hank Bauer (R/R)


      Jonathan Papelbon doesn't get the credit he should receive as probably one of the top half dozen closers of the one-inning era, because apparently he was a highly temperamental sort that feuded with teammates, opponents, umpires, managers, press, probably his paperboy...you get the idea. Further, it's been alleged that a few letters missing from his alphabet soup. His career endgame was being acquired by the Nationals at the deadline in 2015, in a trade he forced. He displaced Drew Storen as closer, which wrecked Storen's confidence and split the clubhouse. A shoving match with Bryce Harper on Sept. 27 was probably the final straw in manager Matt Williams's firing. The next season, the Nats got his replacement as closer at the deadline, and released him shortly thereafter; he never played again. Anyway, 368 saves, 2.44 ERA between 2005-2016 (a pretty high offense era, though down from Bondsian heights); just saying...

      Charlie Ferguson was of course a two-way star; he'll do the starting and bat leadoff, followed by the Ty Cobb of the Federal League, Benny Kauff. Roger Connor, Sherry Magee, and Petey Guerrero are tremendous run producers. The bottom of the lineup gets juggled quite a bit, because Lind and Hall in particular are horrible against LHP, but they mash RHP. We basically have four corner outfield or DH types, but only three slots. Bauer should really play every day, but you just can't squeeze him in against RHP; he should used as a defensive replacement often, although in fairness Hall and Johnson aren't bad. The infield is pretty jerry-rigged. Vizcaino is the shortstop, that's easy, and Triandos is a capable if ordinary receiver. Connor's best position is first base. Guerrero's best are first base and the outfield, but he's the best option for third. When Ferguson isn't pitching, he can handle second, where he was actually something of a slick fielder. When Ferguson is pitching, it gets wild. Guerrero played a little second base, a very little, and it's impossible to imagine he was very good there...but there's no one else. Connor played a fair bit of third base, despite being left-handed...but he was left-handed, and a first baseman, so thriving at third seems a reach. And we have to bring Sherry Magee, the best fielding corner outfielder besides Bauer, to cover first base. Kauff is a little better than average in center, and Lind, when he plays left field, is really terrible.

      Kind of a weird one; I'm not sure whether it would be good or bad. Bauer is the only guy here who managed a WS winner, I'm pretty sure, so he gets the managing gig.


      Lineup, DH, when Ferguson is pitching against RHP:

      Ferguson, 1
      Kauff, 8
      Connor, 5
      Magee, 3
      Guerrero, 4
      Lind, DH (for Vizcaino, 6)
      Hall, 7
      Triandos, 2
      Johnson, 9


      Lineup, DH, when Ferguson is pitching against LHP:

      Ferguson, 1
      Kauff, 8
      Connor, 5
      Magee, 3
      Guerrero, 4
      Bauer, 9
      Triandos, 2
      Lind, DH (for Vizcaino, 6)
      Johnson, 7


      Lineup, DH, when Papelbon is pitching against RHP:

      Ferguson, 4
      Kauff, 8
      Connor, 3
      Magee, 7
      Guerrero, 5
      Lind, DH (for Papelbon, 1)
      Hall, 9
      Triandos, 2
      Vizcaino, 6


      Lineup, DH, when Papelbon is pitching against LHP

      Ferguson, 4
      Kauff, 8
      Connor, 3
      Magee, 7
      Guerrero, 5
      Bauer, 9
      Triandos, 2
      Lind, DH (for Papelbon, 1)
      Vizcaino, 6


      Lineup, no DH, when Ferguson is pitching against RHP:

      Ferguson, 1
      Kauff, 8
      Connor, 5
      Magee, 3
      Guerrero, 4
      Lind, 7
      Hall, 9
      Triandos, 2
      Vizcaino, 6


      Lineup, no DH, when Ferguson is pitching against LHP:

      Ferguson, 1
      Kauff, 8
      Connor, 5
      Magee, 3
      Guerrero, 4
      Bauer, 9
      Triandos, 2
      Johnson, 7
      Vizcaino, 6


      Lineup, no DH, when Papelbon is pitching against RHP:

      Ferguson, 4
      Kauff, 8
      Connor, 3
      Magee, 7
      Guerrero, 5
      Hall, 9
      Triandos, 2
      Vizcaino, 6
      Papelbon, 1


      Lineup, no DH, when Papelbon is pitching against LHP

      Ferguson, 4
      Kauff, 8
      Connor, 3
      Magee, 7
      Guerrero, 5
      Bauer, 9
      Triandos, 2
      Vizcaino, 6
      Papelbon, 1

      Last edited by Cougar; 05-10-2021, 11:44 AM.

      Comment


      • P/OF/3b/1b/SS/2b - Tony Mullane (B/B)
        P/RF - Silver King (R/R)
        P/OF - Frank Kitson (L/R)
        C - Sammy White (R/R)
        1b/SS - Ernie Banks (R/R) [player-manager]
        2b/3b - Wally Backman (B/R)
        2b/SS/OF - Tony Womack (L/R)
        3b - Morgan Ensberg (R/R)
        SS - Monte Cross (R/R)
        SS/OF/IF - Shawon Dunston (R/R)
        SS/2b - Granny Hamner (R/R)
        CF/LF/1b - Johnny Damon (L/L)


        Lineup, Mullane pitching against RHP, waive DH if available:

        Womack, 9
        Backman, 4
        Damon, 8
        Banks, 3
        Ensberg, 5
        Mullane, 1
        Dunston, 7
        Hamner, 6
        White, 2


        Lineup, Mullane pitching against LHP, waive DH if available:

        Womack, 9
        Damon, 8
        Banks, 3
        Ensberg, 5
        Dunston, 7
        Mullane, 1
        Hamner, 4
        White, 2
        Cross, 6


        Lineup, DH, Kitson pitching against RHP:

        Womack, 9
        Backman, 4
        Damon, 8
        Banks, 3
        Ensberg, 5
        Mullane, 7
        Dunston, DH (for White, 2)
        Hamner, 6
        Kitson, 1


        Lineup, no DH, Kitson pitching against RHP:

        Womack, 9
        Backman, 4
        Damon, 8
        Banks, 3
        Ensberg, 5
        Mullane, 7
        Hamner, 6
        ​​​​​​​Kitson, 1
        White, 2


        Lineup, DH, Kitson pitching against LHP:

        Womack, DH (for Kitson, 1)
        Damon, 8
        Banks, 3
        Ensberg, 5
        Dunston, 9
        Mullane, 7
        Hamner, 4
        ​​​​​​​White, 2
        Cross, 6


        Lineup, no DH, Kitson pitching against LHP:

        Womack, 9
        Damon, 8
        Banks, 3
        Ensberg, 5
        Dunston, 7
        Hamner, 6
        ​​​​​​​White, 2
        Cross, 6
        Kitson, 1


        Lineup, DH, King pitching against RHP:

        Womack, 9
        Backman, 4
        Damon, 8
        Banks, 3
        Ensberg, 5
        Mullane, 7
        Dunston, 6
        Hamner, DH (for King, 1)
        ​​​​​​​White, 2


        Lineup, no DH, King pitching against RHP:

        Womack, 9
        Backman, 4
        Damon, 8
        Banks, 3
        Ensberg, 5
        Mullane, 7
        Hamner, 6
        ​​​​​White, 2
        King, 1


        Lineup, DH, King pitching against LHP:

        Womack, 9
        Damon, 8
        Banks, 3
        Ensberg, 5
        Dunston, 7
        Mullane, DH (for King, 1)
        Hamner, 4
        ​​​​​​​White, 2
        Cross, 6


        Lineup, no DH, King pitching against LHP:

        Womack, 9
        Damon, 8
        Banks, 3
        Ensberg, 5
        Dunston, 7
        Hamner, 4
        ​​​​​​​White, 2
        Cross, 6
        ​​​​​​​King, 1


        Three 19th century pitchers that can hit and play the field, a catcher, an outfielder, and a cornucopia of infielders! Banks manages; he's the best player on the team, and why not, let's play two.

        Mullane, Kitson, and King are all above-average pitchers; Mullane should probably be in the Hall, but he was kind of a jerk. King has got a case too, with a little pioneer credit -- it's said he was the first sidearmer. Kitson was very solid as well. The fielding really isn't noteworthy one way or the other. A ton of speed on the basepaths with Womack, Backman, Damon, Dunston, and Mullane, Backman and Cross will platoon, with Hamner going back and forth between SS and 2b; despite being technically a switch hitter, Backman was nonetheless terrible against lefties. Womack is actually a pretty lousy hitter but is a terror once he gets to first. Backman is a scrapper. Damon is a solid all-around hitter and one of the best baserunners ever. Banks is a HOFer with 512 home runs. Ensberg is a good middle-order bat, Mullane is a nice switch hitter. Dunston is dangerous against lefties. Hamner is a pretty good bat for a mid-century middle infielder; White is a decent one for a catcher; Cross is a mediocre one for a turn of the century shortstop.
        Last edited by Cougar; 05-10-2021, 02:45 PM. Reason: Accidentally posted a huge chunk of backlog.

        Comment


        • Fowler switch hits, and Chavez and Northrup bat left-handed.
          Everyone else bats right-handed, and everyone throws right-handed.

          Pitchers - [Ned Garver], Jim Shaw, Doc Ayers, Gus Krock

          C - Benito Santiago
          1b - Joe Kelley [player-manager]
          2b - Frank Bolling
          3b - Eric Chavez
          SS - Harland Clift
          LF - Jim Northrup
          CF - Chris Young
          RF - Dexter Fowler

          Lineup, DH:

          Fowler, 9
          Kelley, 3
          Northrup, 7
          Clift, 6
          Chavez, 5
          Young, 8
          Santiago, 2
          Bolling, 4
          Garver, DH/1

          When Garver is starting, waive the DH. If no DH is available, the pitcher bats last as per usual.

          Garver was a really good pitcher on really bad teams, primarily the late Browns, in the late 1940s and early 1950s. He came to notice recently as having had the best WAR in the AL in 1950; the league MVP, Phil Rizzuto, was second. A cerebral pitcher, he threw a variety of effective breaking balls and rarely threw a strike that wasn't on the black. He was also a very good hitting pitcher and an excellent fielder.

          The rest of the pitching staff couldn't field or hit a lick. Shaw and Ayers were teammates, bit players on the Washington Senators of the 1910s, where Walter Johnson outshone everyone else. Shaw was a very hard thrower who never quite lived up to his promise. Ayers, who acquired his nickname via a short stint in medical school, was a submarine-style spitballer, perhaps unique in the annals of the game. Krock was a one-year wonder, who won 25 games for the 1888 Chicago NL squad but succumbed to injury or fatigue and was never effective again.

          The fielding is nearly universally strong but for a couple spots. Santiago, Bolling, and Chavez are standouts, but Clift is pushed to shortstop as the closest thing we have to one; he played short in the low minors as a teenager before being moved to the left. Kelley played a fair amount of first base, although he was far more a left fielder; he's about average there. Young and Northrup are both very good gloves; Fowler has a good reputation but the fielding stats seem to belie it.

          Fowler is a solid leadoff man, and then Kelley is a brilliant #2 hitter, and the best hitter in the lineup. Sunny Jim, Clift, and Chavvy are all very good mid-order power bats. Young does everything well except hit for average. Santiago's BA comes and goes, and he has decent power, but never walks. Bolling is a good #8 hitter. Garver hits about as well as a terrible regular, which is more than one expects in the nine-hole.

          Kelley is the team's lone HOFer, and he did some managing, so he gets the car keys, although I suppose Clift, out of position, is an option too, now that I think of it.

          Comment


          • Pitchers - Gerrit Cole (R/R), Javier Vasquez (R/R), Zack Britton (L/L)

            C - Damian Miller (R/R)
            1b - Harry Walker (L/R) [player-manager]
            2b - Orlando Merced (B/R)
            3b - Russell Martin (R/R)
            SS - Marty Marion (R/R)
            LF - Ichiro Suzuki (L/R)
            CF - Terry Moore (R/R)
            RF - Tony Oliva (L/R)
            DH - Jose Canseco (R/R)

            Lineup:

            Walker, 3
            Suzuki, 7
            Oliva, 9
            Canseco, DH
            Merced, 4
            Martin, 5
            Moore, 8
            Miller, 2
            Marion, 6

            Cole is a great pitcher in mid-career. Vazquez is a tremendous talent. Britton is a brilliant lefty reliever. Marvelous staff. The outfield defense is fantastic with Ichiro, Moore, and Oliva. The infield is patched together; Marion is an all-timer at shortstop, but Martin, Merced, and Walker are all at secondary or tertiary positions; none are terrible, though. Miller is pretty good behind the plate; he's no Martin, but we need him at third. The top three batters are all batting champions; the Hat is pretty limited, but Ichiro is a magician and Oliva is sublime. Canseco, safely ensconced at DH, is a force at the plate. Merced, Martin, and Moore are solid bats, and Miller and Marion hit well for defensive specialists. We'll have Harry the Hat manage.

            Comment


            • Manager, utility, mop-up pitcher - Mark Koenig (B/R)

              Starting pitcher - Kyle Hendricks (R/R)
              Relief pitcher - Jonathan Papelbon (R/R)

              C - Charlie Bennett (R/R)
              1b - Gus Suhr (L/R)
              2b - Luis Alicea (B/R)
              3b - Ray Knight (R/R)
              SS - Jason Bartlett (R/R)
              LF - Bruce Bochte (L/L)
              CF - Scott Brosius (R/R)
              RF - Matthew Joyce (L/R)
              DH - Carlos Quentin (R/R)

              Lineup against RHP, DH:

              Suhr, 3
              Bennett, 2
              Joyce, 9
              Quentin, DH
              Bochte, 7
              Knight, 5
              Brosius, 8
              Alicea, 4
              Bartlett, 6

              Lineup against RHP, no DH:

              Suhr, 3
              Bennett, 2
              Joyce, 9
              Bochte, 7
              Knight, 5
              Brosius, 8
              Alicea, 4
              Bartlett, 6
              Pitcher, 1

              Lineup against LHP, DH:

              Bennett, 2
              Suhr, 3
              Quentin, DH
              Bochte, 7
              Knight, 5
              Brosius, 8
              Bartlett, 6
              Joyce, 9
              Alicea, 4

              Lineup against LHP, no DH:

              Bennett, 2
              Suhr, 3
              Quentin, 9
              Bochte, 7
              Knight, 5
              Brosius, 8
              Bartlett, 6
              Alicea, 4
              Pitcher, 1

              Hendricks is an ERA champ, a good young pitcher in the Maddux mold; great fielder too. Papelbon was discussed at length a few posts ago. Suhr and Bochte are close to being clones; LHB first basemen with only modest pop and average gloves but good OBP. Bochte played some left field so we can play them both. Bennett was a brilliant defensive catcher and a solid batter. Quentin is the strongest hitter on the team, but a horrid fielder. Joyce is an okay fielder and a fine hitter against RHP, but is close to helpless against LHP. We don't have a true centerfielder; Brosius played there a little, which solves the third base dilemma with Knight; they're both steady but unspectacular hitters. Bartlett is a star fielder at shortstop with a surprisingly decent bat. Alicea is a switch hitting utility man, a favorite of Tony La Russa, who handles the bat well and can hold down second base fine. Koenig was an infielder on Babe Ruth's Yankees, primarily a shortstop. He wasn't a great hitter, nor a great fielder, but he knew how to win or something; he's a switch-hitting bat off the bench who can play just about anywhere other than catcher, and he was also used as a mop-up pitcher in blowouts with some regularity. He can manage too, since he's got all those shiny intangibles.

              Comment


              • Pitchers - Dazzy Vance (R/R), Dennis Leonard (R/R), Cy Blanton (L/R), [Tommy Greene (R/R)]

                C - Mickey Owen (R/R)
                1b - Jeff Reed (L/R)
                2b - Tony Taylor (R/R)
                3b - Curt Flood (R/R) [player-manager]
                SS - Cecil Travis (L/R)
                LF - Angel Pagan (B/R)
                CF - Emmet Heidrick (L/R)
                RF - Jeff Burroughs (R/R)
                DH - Tommy Greene (R/R)

                Lineup, DH:

                Pagan, 7
                Heidrick, 8
                Burroughs, 9
                Travis, 6
                Flood, 5
                Taylor, 4
                Reed, 3
                Owen, 2
                Greene, DH/1 (waive DH when Greene is pitching)

                If no DH, put the pitcher in the #9 spot as per usual.

                Pitching is rather good. Vance is an easy HOFer, Leonard was among the best pitchers in the American League in his heyday, Blanton is an ERA champion, and Greene led the NL in winning percentage. Greene is a good hitter too, about as good as a bad catcher. The defense is a mixed bag. Flood has to play third base, where he played in the minors until they wisely switched him to center field. Reed didn't play first at all, but we have two catchers and no first baseman, and Owen is a better backstop. Pagan and Heidrick are very good outfielders, and Burroughs is a very bad one. Taylor and Travis are about average up the middle. Pagan and especially Heidrick are frisky table-setters, and Burroughs is an outstanding slugger, but then power gets really scarce. Travis and Flood are good hitters for average, and Taylor, Reed, and Owen are respectable. Trailblazer Flood can manage.

                Comment


                • Pitchers - Kenny Rogers (L/L), Brad Penny (R/R), [Otto Hess (L/L)]

                  C - Yank Robinson (R/R)
                  1b - George Kell (R/R)
                  2b - Anthony Rendon (R/R)
                  3b - Nolan Arenado (R/R)
                  SS1 - Cesar Itzuris (B/R)
                  SS2 - Tommy Thevenow (R/R)
                  LF - Harry Stovey (R/R)
                  CF - Cesar Geronimo (L/L)
                  RF - Ezra Sutton (R/R) [player-manager]

                  Lineup, DH, against RHP:

                  Robinson, 2
                  Kell, 3
                  Stovey, 7
                  Rendon, 4
                  Arenado, 5
                  Sutton, 9
                  Geronimo, 8
                  Hess, DH/1 (waive DH if Hess is starting)
                  Itzuris, 6

                  Lineup, no DH, against RHP, Hess not pitching:

                  Robinson, 2
                  Kell, 3
                  Stovey, 7
                  Rendon, 4
                  Arenado, 5
                  Sutton, 9
                  Geronimo, 8
                  Itzuris, 6
                  Pitcher, 1

                  Lineup, no DH, Hess pitching against RHP:

                  Robinson, 2
                  Kell, 3
                  Stovey, 7
                  Rendon, 4
                  Arenado, 5
                  Sutton, 9
                  Geronimo, 8
                  Hess, 1
                  Itzuris, 6

                  Lineup, DH, against LHP:

                  Robinson, 2
                  Kell, 3
                  Stovey, 7
                  Rendon, 4
                  Arenado,
                  Sutton, 9
                  Geronimo, 8
                  Itzuris, DH
                  Thevenow, 6

                  Lineup, no DH, against LHP:

                  Robinson, 2
                  Kell, 3
                  Stovey, 7
                  Rendon, 4
                  Arenado, 5
                  Sutton, 9
                  Geronimo, 8
                  Thevenow, 6
                  Pitcher, 1

                  The Gambler (RIP, real Kenny) was one of the better left-handers of his generation. Penny was a solid innings eater. Hess had a few good seasons in Deadball. On defense, it’s a Team of Third Basemen. Arenado is one of the best ever at third, and Rendon, Kell, and Sutton can hold their own at secondary or tertiary positions. Robinson, mainly a second baseman, could play anywhere, so he’s catching. Geronimo is famously good in center field, and Stovey is fine in left. At shortstop we have two classic “good-field, no-hit” types that we’ll plug-and-play as best we can; Itzuris switch hits and is better overall, but Thevenow represents a modest threat against LHP. Robinson runs well and walks a lot, Kell is a .300 hitting HOFer with doubles power. Stovey splashed Black Ink all over the American Association in the 1880s. Rendon and Arenado are current stars in their primes. Sutton was another very good hitter from the 1870s and 1880s. Geronimo was a decent left-handed bat for the absurdly loaded Big Red Machine. Sutton is probably more out-of-position than anyone else, so he’s a fair choice to skipper.

                  Comment


                  • Pitchers - Ned Garver (R/R), Johnny Vander Meer (B/L), Gene Packard (L/L), Gene Thompson (R/R) [player-manager]

                    C - Yogi Berra (L/R)
                    1b - Terry Kennedy (L/R)
                    2b - Gus Suhr (L/R)
                    3b - Mike Kreevich (R/R)
                    SS - Larry Bowa (B/R)
                    LF - Austin Jackson (R/R)
                    CF - Joe DiMaggio (R/R)
                    RF - Bobby Bonds (R/R)

                    Lineup:

                    Jackson, 7
                    Bonds, 9
                    DiMaggio, 8
                    Berra, 2
                    Suhr, 4
                    Kennedy, 3
                    Kreevich, 5
                    Bowa, 6
                    Pitcher, 1

                    We wrote up Garver pretty recently. Everyone knows Vander Meer’s claim to fame. Packard had two big seasons in the somewhat dubious Federal League, while Thompson was a mid-rotation guy for Bill McKechnie’s Reds. Thompson went on to a fifty-plus year career as a scout for the Giants following his playing days, so perhaps he’d make a good manager too.


                    We’ve got another double-catcher situation, which Yogi wins, of course; that pushes Kennedy to first base, which in turn pushes Suhr to his initial minor league position of second base. Kreevich was mainly an outfielder, but he played a fair bit of third in the minors, and a little in the majors. Then things get pretty sweet; Bowa is an outstanding shortstop, and an outfield of Action Jackson, the Yankee Clipper, and Papa Bonds is fantastic.

                    Similarly, when the heart of your order is Bonds, DiMaggio, and Berra, you’ve got a heckuva base to build on. Jackson probably makes the most sense at leadoff, although he and Bonds will tally a phenomenal number of K’s. Joe D. and Yogi…how many championships between them? Suhr is a good on-base man, Kennedy is a league average lefty bat, Kreevich is a speedy, slap-hitting type, and Bowa is a lesser version of Kreevich.
                    ​​​​​​​

                    Comment


                    • Pitchers – Jacob deGrom (L/R), [Jim Devlin (R/R)], Bill Stafford (R/R), Willie Hernandez (L/L)

                      C – Joe Girardi (R/R)
                      1b – Grady Hatton (L/R)
                      2b – Frank White (R/R)
                      3b – Robin Ventura (L/R)
                      SS – Bobby Grich (R/R)
                      LF – Cliff Floyd (L/R)
                      CF – Jigger Statz (R/R) [player-manager]
                      RF – Fernando Vina (L/R)
                      DH – Jim Devlin (R/R)

                      Lineup, DH:

                      Statz, 8
                      Floyd, 7
                      Grich, 6
                      Ventura, 5
                      White, 4
                      Devlin, DH/1 (waive DH if Devlin is pitching)
                      Hatton, 3
                      Vina, 9
                      Girardi, 2

                      Lineup, no DH, Devlin not pitching:

                      Statz, 8
                      Floyd, 7
                      Grich, 6
                      Ventura, 5
                      White, 4
                      Hatton, 3
                      Vina, 9
                      Girardi, 2
                      Pitcher, 1

                      Lineup tweaked to be a countdown:

                      Vina, 9
                      Statz, 8
                      Floyd, 7
                      Grich, 6
                      Ventura, 5
                      White, 4
                      Hatton, 3
                      Girardi, 2
                      Pitcher, 1

                      Kind of amazing the only guy who ever won a MVP here is Willie Hernandez. Not that he's not a good closer, but he had a really short peak; he lived on his lefty screwball. deGrom is obviously spectacular, and Devlin may have been just as good for a short time, before he got caught helping to fix games. Bill Stafford was an unremarkable pitcher on the Yankees in the 1960s. This is another team overloaded with infielders; we have three Gold Glove second basemen alone. Grich was a terrific shortstop as well, which leaves Vina and White; White>Vina, so unfortunately Vina has to fill in a gap at an outfield corner. Statz and Floyd are pretty good in the rest of the outfield. Hatton didn't play much first, but if one can manage second and third, first doesn't present a tremendous challenge. He can't play third because the spectacular Ventura is there. Girardi is the last puzzle piece at catcher.

                      Statz, a veteran PCL manager that we'll acknowledge here, is a solid leadoff man, and Floyd is a tremendously talented hitter frequently sidelined by injury. Grich and Ventura are a pretty terrific one-two punch at third and cleanup. White probably should bat lower in the lineup, but I wanted a little more power at #5. Devlin was about a league-average hitter. Hatton and Vina were a little below average, but still quite respectable, and Girardi, bless his heart, swung a wet noodle.

                      Comment


                      • Pitchers – Hooks Wiltse (R/L) [player-manager], Paul Quantrill (L/R), Brad Brach (R/R), [Sam Rice (L/R)]

                        C – Eddie Ainsmith (R/R)
                        1b/3b – Brook Jacoby (R/R)
                        2b/SS – Don Kessinger (B/R)
                        3b/RF/1b – Casey Blake (R/R)
                        SS/2b – Rabbit Maranville (R/R)
                        LF/RF – Brian Giles (L/L)
                        CF/UT – Bill Hall (R/R)
                        RF/OF – Sam Rice (L/R)
                        DH/LF/RF/1b – Frank Thomas (R/R)

                        Lineup, DH, Rice not pitching:

                        Maranville, 6
                        Rice, 9
                        Giles, 7
                        Howard, DH
                        Blake, 5
                        Jacoby, 3
                        Hall, 8
                        Ainsmith, 2
                        Kessinger, 4

                        Lineup, no DH, Rice not pitching:

                        Maranville, 6
                        Rice, 8
                        Giles, 7
                        Howard, 9
                        Blake, 5
                        Jacoby, 3
                        Hall, 4
                        Ainsmith, 2
                        Pitcher, 1

                        Lineup, Rice pitching, Howard in the outfield (waive DH if available):

                        Maranville, 6
                        Rice, 1
                        Giles, 9
                        Howard, 7
                        Blake, 5
                        Jacoby, 3
                        Hall, 8
                        Ainsmith, 2
                        Kessinger, 4

                        Lineup, Rice pitching, Howard at first base (waive DH if available):

                        Maranville, 6
                        Rice, 1
                        Giles, 7
                        Howard, 3
                        Blake, 9
                        Jacoby, 5
                        Hall, 8
                        Ainsmith, 2
                        Kessinger, 4


                        Wiltse pitched for the Giants in the early years of the 20th century; a consistent, reliable pitcher, he was noted as a fantastic fielder – “Hooks” referred not (or not only; accounts vary) to his curveball, but to his facility for snaring batted balls seemingly beyond his reach. He was also a fairly good hitting pitcher, sometimes playing first base or the outfield, and he also was a first base coach and pitching coach in the majors, and a manager in the minors; even briefly an owner (RIP, Reading Pretzels). As our only starter, we’ll have Hooks manage too. Quantrill and Brach are contemporary relievers, mostly in the middle or setup innings. Quantrill was pretty good, exceptionally durable and possessing marvelous control. Brach is still active, having just caught on with the Reds organization; he throws a fastball, slider, and splitter. Rice started as a pitcher, and posted good stats; he was such a good hitter that he was induced to give up the mound, but he could have made the majors that way too.

                        The defense is pretty much fantastic. They benefit by the opportunity to put big Frank at DH, everyone else is pretty slick. There isn’t a pure center fielder, but Hall is pretty good wherever one puts him. Rice and Giles can also play center; Rice was a good fielder, Giles merely adequate. Rabbit is a magician at shortstop, and Kessinger is a fine fielder covering second. Blake is a good fielder at third, while Jacoby, somewhat challenged at third, is overqualified for first. Ainsmith is a terrific defensive catcher, and as mentioned Wiltse is extraordinary off the mound. If we don’t have the DH, we can put Howard in a corner and Rice in center. If Rice is pitching, there are suitable deployments that station the Capital Punisher in either the outfield or first base.

                        Maranville doesn’t hit well enough to lead off as a general rule, but, well, he’s Rabbit, and it just feels right. Rice is a terrific second place hitter, and Giles is a toolsy hitter with power, patience, speed, and a good average. Howard will terrify opposing pitchers in the cleanup spot, and then Blake and Jacoby are both solid (and rather similar) hitters behind him. Hall falls off a little on batting average but has decent power and speed, and then Ainsmith and Kessinger wind up the lineup pretty punchlessly.

                        Comment


                        • Pitchers (all R/R) - Trevor Bauer [player-manager], Bruce Kison, Tricky Nichols

                          C - Jason Kendall (R/R)
                          1b - Jeff Bagwell (R/R)
                          2b - Dickie Thon (R/R)
                          3b - Dick Allen (R/R)
                          SS - Shawon Dunston (R/R)
                          LF - Charlie Jamieson (L/L)
                          CF - Jim Edmonds (L/L)
                          RF - Kiki Cuyler (R/R)
                          DH - Dave Kingman (R/R)

                          Lineup, DH

                          Jamieson, 7
                          Cuyler, 9
                          Bagwell, 3
                          Allen, 5
                          Edmonds, 8
                          Kingman, DH
                          Dunston, 6
                          Thon, 4
                          Kendall, 2

                          Lineup, no DH, against RHP, and/or with defensive emphasis:

                          Jamieson, 7
                          Cuyler, 9
                          Bagwell, 3
                          Allen, 5
                          Edmonds, 8
                          Dunston, 6
                          Thon, 4
                          Kendall, 2
                          Pitcher, 1

                          Lineup, no DH, against LHP, and/or with offensive emphasis:

                          Kendall, 2
                          Cuyler, 9
                          Bagwell, 3
                          Allen, 5
                          Edmonds, 8
                          Kingman, 7
                          Dunston, 6
                          Thon, 4
                          Pitcher, 1

                          The active Bauer is one of the best pitchers in baseball, gifted with a marvelous fastball and aided by his iconoclastic, cerebral approach; he's said to have 19 pitches in his arsenal, a variety of fastballs, changeup, curves, sliders, sinkers, and a hard screwball he calls a "reverse slider". Kison played for the 1970s Pirates and the early 1980s Angels; he was a fastball/slider pitcher who threw to contact and guarded the inside of the plate. Tricky Nichols was an 1870s pitcher who acquired his nickname by being among the first pitchers to experiment with changing speeds; the experiments were dubious; aside from 1876, where he appeared in only one game, he never had a winning record. In his best season, 1877, he went 18-23 in 350 innings posting an ERA just a tick above average while leading the NL in walks.

                          Defense is a mixed bag. The outfield is terrific, at least while Kong is safely at DH, Kendall is an above average catcher, and the right side of the infield is marvelous with Thon and Bags. Dunston had all the tools in the world to be an excellent shortstop, most of all a breathtaking throwing arm, but, well, it never happened. Thon is actually better at short, but he has more experience at second than Dunston, who mostly played outfield when he wasn't at second. Similarly, we'd rather put Allen in an outfield corner or first base than at third, but there's no room at the inn; two HOFers & a solid guy in Jamieson. Indeed, Kingman, in his limited play at third base, is arguably a better glove than Allen, but Allen played over four times more games there.

                          The offense is pretty fierce, especially the first two-thirds. Jamieson is a genuine .300 hitter who draws a decent share of walks too; very little power but that's not essential for a leadoff guy. Then Cuyler hits .320 with boatloads of doubles, triples, and steals; Bagwell & Allen are top quartile HOF bats, Edmonds has almost 400 HR, and Kong has over 400 HR. Dunston is a middling threat minimized by a complete dearth of plate discipline, Thon was an emerging star before the tragic beaning, and Kendall is the rare speedy catcher that hits for a good BA.

                          Bauer is an interesting thinker; he probably doesn't have a managerial temperament, but let's give it a shot and see what happens.

                          Comment


                          • Pitchers - Herb Pennock (B/L), Bronson Arroyo (R/R), Ned Garvin (R/R)

                            C - Mike Grady (R/R)
                            1b - Luis Gonzalez (L/R)
                            2b - Bill Mazeroski (R/R)
                            3b - Bucky Harris (R/R) [player-manager]
                            SS - Al Dark (R/R)
                            LF - George Selkirk (L/R)
                            CF - Bake McBride (L/R)
                            RF - Giancarlo Stanton (R/R)
                            DH - Bill Nicholson (L/R)

                            Pennock, a durable HOFer who won championships with the A's, Red Sox, and Yankees, was a slick-fielding soft thrower with three different curveballs to befuddle hitters. Arroyo, another great fielding pitcher, rode a sweeping curve and a lively fastball to a solid MLB career with nearly 150 wins. Garvin was a turn-of-the-20th-century reprobate who threw an early version of what would today be called a hard screwball. He's been called one of the hardest-luck pitchers of all time, but he was such a dislikeable, maniacally violent ne'er-do-well I suspect he made much of his own luck.

                            This was a tricky lineup to construct; we had surpluses of corner outfielders (4) and second basemen (2), but no corner infielders. Mazeroski was one of the second basemen, so he was obviously going to prevail in any battle to field the position; fortunately, the competition, Harris, played a lot of third in the minors. And Luis Gonzalez was initially a 1b prospect in the minors. Grady is the only catcher, Dark the only shortstop, and Bake the only centerfielder, so that was easy. Of the three corner outfielders, they all were above average gloves, but Swish Nicholson was a clear third behind Selkirk and Stanton, so he'll DH. When there's no DH, McBride probably sits, which is not a slight on Bake but a recognition of the potency of the bats of Nicholson, Stanton, and Selkirk.

                            Grady, who as it happens was a neighbor and mentor of Pennock's in Kennett Square, PA, was an offensive catcher with good speed and a solid OBP. McBride was a talented, good hitting speedster. Nicholson was the dominant slugger in the NL during WWII. Gonzo and don't-call-me-Mike each hit nearly 60 HR in their best seasons. Selkirk was a professional hitter for the great Yankee teams under Joe McCarthy. Dark, an all-around athlete who starred in five sports at LSU, chose baseball and was a ROY and one of the better shortstops in the NL for about a decade; he went on to a decorated managerial career. Maz was a limited hitter who seems to have had an element of clutch to him. Harris is a scrappy, speedy batter who became a HOF manager and who seems the obvious choice to manage here.

                            Lineup, DH, against RHP:

                            McBride, 8
                            Gonzalez, 3
                            Nicholson, DH
                            Stanton, 9
                            Selkirk, 7
                            Grady, 2
                            Dark, 6
                            Mazeroski, 4
                            Harris, 5

                            Lineup, no DH, against RHP:

                            Grady, 2
                            Gonzalez, 3
                            Nicholson, 9
                            Stanton, 8
                            Selkirk, 7
                            Dark, 6
                            Mazeroski, 4
                            Harris, 5
                            Pitcher, 1

                            Lineup, DH, against LHP:

                            Grady, 2
                            Selkirk, 7
                            Stanton, 9
                            Gonzalez, 3
                            Nicholson, DH
                            Dark, 6
                            Mazeroski, 4
                            Harris, 5
                            McBride, 8

                            Lineup, no DH, against LHP:

                            Grady, 2
                            Selkirk, 7
                            Stanton, 8
                            Gonzalez, 3
                            Nicholson, 9
                            Dark, 6
                            Mazeroski, 4
                            Harris, 5
                            Pitcher, 1

                            ----------------------------------------------

                            Johnson and Washington are LHB. All others are RHB.
                            Everyone throws right-handed except Washington, a lefty.

                            Pitchers - Curt Schilling, Kenta Maeda, Rube Foster, Wilcy Moore

                            C - Michael Barrett
                            1b - Mike Sweeney
                            2b - Dustin Pedroia
                            3b - Clete Boyer
                            SS - Manny Machado
                            LF - Roy Johnson
                            CF - Trea Turner
                            RF - Claudell Washington [player-manager]

                            Lineup, DH:

                            Johnson, 7
                            Turner, 8
                            Machado, 6
                            Sweeney, 3
                            Pedroia, 4
                            Washington, 9
                            Barrett, 2
                            Boyer, 5
                            Foster, DH/1 (waive DH when Foster is pitching)

                            If no DH, the pitcher bats #9 as per usual.

                            Schilling is the ace. Maeda starred in his native Japan and has been top-shelf since arriving in America. Foster was a curveballer with great control who starred for the last Red Sox dynasty of the 20th century. Moore led the AL in saves three times and in ERA once, in his rookie season on the fabled '27 Yankees; his meal ticket was a sidearmed sinker. There's a tremendous amount of speed in the outfield and the infield boasts the premium gloves of Boyer, Pedroia, and Machado, although Manny is better at third than short. Barrett is below average behind the plate, and Sweeney is merely adequate at first. The small, limber Foster was noted to be one of the best fielders off the mound of his day.

                            Johnson, Indian Bob's brother, hit for a terrific average and stole a lot of bases. Washington was very similar, but with more power and lesser OBP. Turner, usually a shortstop, has developed into perhaps the premier table-setter in the NL. Machado is an astounding talent, Sweeney a terrific hitter, and Pedroia a fearsome force of nature. Barrett and Boyer, below average but dangerous hitters, wind up the lineup. Foster is a better hitter (though he's far from extraordinary) than his fellow twirlers, so when a DH is present, Rube ought to hit when he can.

                            Claudell passed last year, so we'll give him a nod and tap him to manage.

                            Comment


                            • Pitchers - [Cy Young (R/R)], Shane Bieber (R/R), Woody Williams (R/R), [Denny Driscoll (L/L)], Jonathan Broxton (R/R)

                              C - Rick Cerone (R/R)
                              1b-a - Cy Young (R/R)
                              1b-b - Denny Driscoll (L/L)
                              2b - Ron Hunt (R/R)
                              3b - David Wright (R/R) [player-manager]
                              SS - Eric McNair (R/R)
                              LF - Al Simmons (R/R)
                              CF - Garry Maddox (R/R)
                              RF - Don Mueller (L/R)

                              Lineup, Young/Driscoll pitching against RHP:

                              Maddox, 8
                              Hunt, 4
                              Simmons, 7
                              Wright, 5
                              Mueller, 9
                              McNair, 6
                              Cerone, 2
                              Driscoll, 3/1
                              Young, 1/3

                              Lineup, Young/Driscoll pitching against LHP:

                              Maddox, 8
                              Hunt, 4
                              Simmons, 7
                              Wright, 5
                              McNair, 6
                              Cerone, 2
                              Mueller, 9
                              Young, 1/3
                              Driscoll, 3/1

                              Lineup, Bieber, Broxton, or Williams pitching:

                              Maddox, 8
                              Hunt, 4
                              Simmons, 7
                              Wright, 5
                              Mueller, 9
                              McNair, 6
                              Cerone, 2
                              Young, 3
                              Pitcher, 1

                              Young was a half-decent hitter and played first base in five games. Driscoll never played first, but he played outfield and third, so presumably he can hack first when Young is pitching. Young is the most prolific pitcher who ever lived, Bieber is the defending AL Cy Young champion, Williams was a solid pitcher over a long career, Driscoll was the ERA champion of the 1882 AA. Broxton was a big ol' closer. Maddox is a great fielder and average hitter with good speed. Hunt is a steady hitter known for getting plunked. Simmons was a 1920s & 1930s superstar. Wright is the greatest living Met. Mueller led the NL in hits in 1954 for the pennant-winning Giants, and was second in batting average behind his teammate Willie Mays. McNair was a teammate of Simmons's on the last great Connie Mack teams. Cerone had the impossible job of succeeding Thurman Munson, and did so with grace, class, and success. The gallant Wright can manage.

                              Comment


                              • Pitchers - Red Ames (B/R), [Spaceman Bill Lee (L/L)], Strawberry Bill Bernhard (B/R), [Terry Larkin (R/R)], Joe Hoerner (R/L)

                                C - Thurman Munson (R/R)
                                1b - Jake Beckley (L/L) [player-manager]
                                2b - Bid McPhee (R/R)
                                3b - Arlie Latham (R/R)
                                SS - Walt Weiss (B/R)
                                LF - Cleon Jones (R/L)
                                CF - Charley Jones (R/R)
                                RF(1) - Terry Larkin (R/R)
                                RF[2) - Spaceman Bill Lee (L/L)

                                Lineup, Larkin not pitching:

                                Latham, 5
                                McPhee, 4
                                Ch. Jones, 8
                                Beckley, 3
                                Munson, 2
                                Cl. Jones, 7
                                Larkin, 9
                                Weiss, 6
                                Pitcher, 1

                                Lineup, Larkin pitching:

                                Latham, 5
                                McPhee, 4
                                Ch. Jones, 8
                                Beckley, 3
                                Munson, 2
                                Cl. Jones, 7
                                Larkin, 1
                                Weiss, 6
                                Lee, 9

                                Ames threw a marvelous curveball for John McGraw's early Giant teams; he pitched best in the cold weather months, and often started Opening Day despite being on a staff with Christy Mathewson. Lee was an athletic, cerebral junkballer in the 1970s and 1980s who pitched a complete game shutout in the minors at age 65! Best hitter among the true pitchers, and probably spry enough to.shag flies when Larkin is on the mound. Bernhard, a contemporary of Ames, was a hard thrower who was regarded as.one of the game's great gentlemen. Larkin was a talented two-way player and a psychopath prone to violence. His main non-mound position was second base, but he played some outfield and should be fine in right. Hoerner was a good lefty reliever in the late 1960s and early 1970s.

                                A couple of HOFers in the lineup, and perhaps a few other guys who ought to be. Latham, "The Freshest Man on Earth," was one of the greatest basestealers of all time, finishing 7th all time with 742. Only Vince Coleman stole more bases without reaching Cooperstown. He was also a terrific fielder. McPhee, Latham's close contemporary, was an even better fielder and hitter, with triple and home run crowns,, and close to as good a basestealer, 24th all time with 568. One more guy from the hardscrabble early days, Charley Jones, bats third; he's a home run champion as well. Another old guy, but the first born after the Civil War (!), Jake Beckley, bats cleanup. A HOFer and the most durable first baseman of baseball's first fifty years, he adds another triples crown to the team mantle, and fell just short of 3000 hits. Munson brings us into living memory; the clutch, gritty catcher for the 1970s Yankees. Staying in the Big Apple, Cleon Jones was the best hitter on the (pitching-dominated) Miracle Mets. Larkin, one more antebellum birth, led the NL in walks in 1878, with, uh, seventeen; different times. Weiss is a glove-first switch hitter who is mediocre from both sides of the plate. We'll have the veteran Beckley manage.

                                Comment

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