Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

When I remember LOU GEHRIG ...

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #16
    I think FIRST of his indestructibility, his iron-man streak.

    Secondly, I think of his phenomenal offense, which underlaid his career.

    Thirdly, I think of his wonderful, sweet human nature. He was as great a person as he was an athlete. His premature loss was such a tragedy.

    Bill Burgess

    Comment


    • #17
      I probably "should" think of Gehrig's incredible record he amassed over his glorious career. One gander at his page in the Baseball Encyclopedia confirms my assessment of him as the best 1B ever.

      But when I think of Gehrig, the first thing that comes to mind is the "luckiest man" speech.
      "Hey Mr. McGraw! Can I pitch to-day?"

      Comment


      • #18
        Interesting: Lou was a man with truly great "numbers" (season stats and career totals) -- yet the poll so far shows that most of us think first of the things you can't measure by numbers.
        Luke

        Comment


        • #19
          Originally posted by Sultan_1895-1948
          lol, no probably not. It was certainly a complicated relationship. No surprise when Babe is involved. Their relationship always relied on Lou playing second fiddle to Ruth, but it was something Lou didn't mind at all. It was his idol afterall.
          .....
          Great stuff, Sultan. I'm sure that Gehrig appreciated Ruth taking the media heat off of him...but probably not being coerced into things he didn't want to do.
          Is the whole story about Mom Gehrig igniting the feud true, or is that a myth?
          "I throw him four wide ones, then try to pick him off first base." - Preacher Roe on pitching to Musial

          Comment


          • #20
            I actually wonder if Ruth did sleep with his wife on the way to Japan...thus them never speaking again

            Comment


            • #21
              Originally posted by Imapotato
              I actually wonder if Ruth did sleep with his wife on the way to Japan...thus them never speaking again
              What? What the . . . Where did you get that, JT?

              In her book, My Luke & I, Eleanor Gehrig never said that! Her story was quite simple. Babe/Lou began their feud, over Mom Gehrig's snide remark that Claire dressed her own daughter, Julia, better than Babe's daughter, Dorothy.

              Mom Gehrig made the remark to a Yankee wife, who relayed it to Claire. Clarie coersed Babe to tell Lou to tell his Mom to mind her own business. Well, no one spoke to Lou about his mom like that. That happened in spring training, 1933.

              On the trip to Japan, post season, 1934, Mrs. Gehrig ran into the Ruth's on deck. They persuaded her to visit their cabin, and drank for a few hours.

              Lou was frantic when he couldn't find her. He had the entire crew searching for her and dreading if she had fallen overboard. When Eleanor finally emerged from the Ruth's cabin, Lou was so shocked. The one place he thought she'd never be. He didn't speak to her the rest of the trip.

              But she didn't sleep with Babe!

              Bill
              Last edited by Bill Burgess; 03-02-2006, 08:42 PM.

              Comment


              • #22
                Here's a piece from "The Luckiest Man" by Jonathan Eig

                pg 191

                Meanwhile, her husband was searching frantically, afraid that his wife had fallen overboard. When he found her in Ruth's cabin, he was furious. Eleanor, who always enjoyed alcohol more than her husband, admits in her book that she was drunk. For a long time after the incident, rumors circulated that Eleanor and Ruth had indulged in more than champaign and caviar. Eleanor denied having had sex with the Babe. Years later, Dickey, Gehrig's best friend, would steadfastly refuse to breach the subject. "It just is unpleasant to think about even now," he told one interviewer. "When I went up there [to the Yankees] they were good friends and they kidded each other a lot and they got along fine. Then something happened. I dont want to tell you about it."

                This leads me to believe that something did happen and that Dickey knew about it.
                "I was pitching one day when my glasses clouded up on me. I took them off to polish them. When I looked up to the plate, I saw Jimmie Foxx. The sight of him terrified me so much that I haven't been able to wear glasses since." - Left Gomez

                "(Lou) Gehrig never learned that a ballplayer couldn't be good every day." - Hank Gowdy

                Comment


                • #23
                  Originally posted by Myankee4life
                  Here's a piece from "The Luckiest Man" by Jonathan Eig

                  pg 191

                  Meanwhile, her husband was searching frantically, afraid that his wife had fallen overboard. When he found her in Ruth's cabin, he was furious. Eleanor, who always enjoyed alcohol more than her husband, admits in her book that she was drunk. For a long time after the incident, rumors circulated that Eleanor and Ruth had indulged in more than champaign and caviar. Eleanor denied having had sex with the Babe. Years later, Dickey, Gehrig's best friend, would steadfastly refuse to breach the subject. "It just is unpleasant to think about even now," he told one interviewer. "When I went up there [to the Yankees] they were good friends and they kidded each other a lot and they got along fine. Then something happened. I dont want to tell you about it."

                  This leads me to believe that something did happen and that Dickey knew about it.
                  Wasn't Claire also there in the Cabin?
                  Johnny
                  Delusion, Life's Coping Mechanism

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    Yea she was, but them being drunk......anything could of happen.
                    "I was pitching one day when my glasses clouded up on me. I took them off to polish them. When I looked up to the plate, I saw Jimmie Foxx. The sight of him terrified me so much that I haven't been able to wear glasses since." - Left Gomez

                    "(Lou) Gehrig never learned that a ballplayer couldn't be good every day." - Hank Gowdy

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      Originally posted by johnny
                      Wasn't Claire also there in the Cabin?

                      Myankee, just don't go there. Claire was in the cabin, period. Nothing went on. Gehrig was simply jealous that he found he in there.

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        Explain to me what Dickey meant then?

                        Not saying something happened...but Bill was surprised as how speculation like that came about.
                        "I was pitching one day when my glasses clouded up on me. I took them off to polish them. When I looked up to the plate, I saw Jimmie Foxx. The sight of him terrified me so much that I haven't been able to wear glasses since." - Left Gomez

                        "(Lou) Gehrig never learned that a ballplayer couldn't be good every day." - Hank Gowdy

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          Originally posted by Myankee4life
                          Here's a piece from "The Luckiest Man" by Jonathan Eig

                          pg 191

                          Meanwhile, her husband was searching frantically, afraid that his wife had fallen overboard. When he found her in Ruth's cabin, he was furious. Eleanor, who always enjoyed alcohol more than her husband, admits in her book that she was drunk. For a long time after the incident, rumors circulated that Eleanor and Ruth had indulged in more than champaign and caviar. Eleanor denied having had sex with the Babe. Years later, Dickey, Gehrig's best friend, would steadfastly refuse to breach the subject. "It just is unpleasant to think about even now," he told one interviewer. "When I went up there [to the Yankees] they were good friends and they kidded each other a lot and they got along fine. Then something happened. I dont want to tell you about it."


                          This leads me to believe that something did happen and that Dickey knew about it.
                          You should type the entire thing, not just a portion:

                          "One day during the journey, Eleanor was taking a walk when she saw Claire Ruth sitting on a deck chair. She knew that the Ruths and Gehrigs were not on speaking terms, but she nevertheless decided to say hello, according to her memoirs. Claire returned the greeting.

                          When Eleanor passed by again later, the women spoke, apparently agreeing that they found the feud between their husbands silly. Claire invited Eleanor to drop by her cabin to talk to the Babe. As Eleanor entered, she wrote, she saw "the resplendent Babe, sitting like a Buddha figure, cross-legged and surrounded by an empire of caviar and champagne. It was an extraordinary picnic, especially since I'd never been able to get my fill of caviar, and suddenly I was looking at mounds of it." Eleanor stayed in the cabin with Ruth and his wife for two hours."
                          -----------------------------------------------

                          Myankee, Dickey's comments mean nothing. You're taking 2+2 and getting 6. Gehrig was guarded when it came to his personal life, and Eleanor was an especially touchy subject. Lou getting the jealous was something he was probably ashamed of. Dickey's comments only show his reluctant attitude toward discussing anything about Gehrig's personal life. Or Maybe the "something" he referred to was nothing more than the original issue dealing with Dorothy and Julia. You're making quite a leap here. A leap that makes every other myth about Babe, appear to be concrete fact.

                          Comment


                          • #28
                            Nothing happened it seemed. It did however further damage Babe's and Lou's relationship. Did Lou ever forgive Babe?
                            "I was pitching one day when my glasses clouded up on me. I took them off to polish them. When I looked up to the plate, I saw Jimmie Foxx. The sight of him terrified me so much that I haven't been able to wear glasses since." - Left Gomez

                            "(Lou) Gehrig never learned that a ballplayer couldn't be good every day." - Hank Gowdy

                            Comment


                            • #29
                              Originally posted by Myankee4life
                              Nothing happened it seemed. It did however further damage Babe's and Lou's relationship. Did Lou ever forgive Babe?
                              Forgive Babe for his own wife going to talk with Babe and Claire? The question is; did he ever forgive himself for over-reacting.

                              The hug was a great start, but because of Lou's passing, the patchwork could only go so far.

                              Comment


                              • #30
                                The Luckies Man Speech has a place in Americana. It is beyond reproach.
                                I'm a Ramblin' Wreck from Georgia Tech and a Hell of an Engineer!

                                Comment

                                Ad Widget

                                Collapse
                                Working...
                                X