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  • Worst Combined Team made up of your "favorite" team, which you have seen play

    Here is something that I thought would be fun.

    Pick your favorite team (mine is the White Sox), and make the absolute worst team you possibly can (career and or "peak"). The only requirement is that they must have played in your lifetime and you've seen and/or followed them during this time (so no guys who left when you were two).

    I started following the White Sox in 1981, after the strike (yes, I'm that weird guy!) I'll be editing this as I carefully consider the culprits. So much bad!




    2B - Steve Sax. This position is a tough one. So many bad players! For my first attempt, I'm going with Steve Sax, who couldn't hit or field. Slash line of 0.236/0.289/0.315. Fun fact: A buddy of mine went to three Sox games year and Sax made an error in each! Good think he didn't have season tickets.

    RF - Sammy "the Panther" Sosa. His slash line for the White Sox was a mighty 0.227/0.276/0.382, 1032 PA, and he was still learning to play the field (although he did have raw skills at that point). Fun Fact: Perhaps the greasiest looking player I've ever seen. I remember one time when the grease from his long hair literally stained his white jersey. Yuck.

    The Padres should bring back Bruce Bochy as manager.
    Play the Who am I? game in trivia and you can make this signature line yours for 3 days (baseball signatures only!)

    Go here for a link to all player links! http://www.baseball-fever.com/forum/...player-threads

    Go here for all your 1920's/1930's OF info

  • #2
    Originally posted by Toledo Inquisition View Post
    Here is something that I thought would be fun.

    Pick your favorite team (mine is the White Sox), and make the absolute worst team you possibly can (career and or "peak"). The only requirement is that they must have played in your lifetime and you've seen and/or followed them during this time (so no guys who left when you were two).

    I started following the White Sox in 1981, after the strike (yes, I'm that weird guy!) I'll be editing this as I carefully consider the culprits. So much bad!




    2B - Steve Sax. This position is a tough one. So many bad players! For my first attempt, I'm going with Steve Sax, who couldn't hit or field. Slash line of 0.236/0.289/0.315. Fun fact: A buddy of mine went to three Sox games year and Sax made an error in each! Good think he didn't have season tickets.

    RF - Sammy "the Panther" Sosa. His slash line for the White Sox was a mighty 0.227/0.276/0.382, 1032 PA, and he was still learning to play the field (although he did have raw skills at that point). Fun Fact: Perhaps the greasiest looking player I've ever seen. I remember one time when the grease from his long hair literally stained his white jersey. Yuck.
    This is so hard - because if you remember them enough : they probably were okay enough to get enough PAs to remember. The worst players in Cardinal history the past 40 years are guys I forgot were even on the team.

    I could probably picj a team of notoriously bad disapointments, contract failures, or fallen ex-heroes.
    1885 1886 1926 1931 1934 1942 1944 1946 1964 1967 1982 2006 2011

    1887 1888 1928 1930 1943 1968 1985 1987 2004 2013

    1996 2000 2001 2002 2005 2009 2012 2014 2015


    The Top 100 Pitchers In MLB History
    The Top 100 Position Players In MLB History

    Comment


    • #3
      SP – Homer Bailey (2007-2018)
      The “best” of the stinkers. Bailey somehow threw two no-hitters in a pair of seasons where he was barely a league average pitcher. Beyond those two seasons, however, the guy who was once the top pitching prospect in baseball had nothing to speak of when he was on the field and the only thing keeping him from more piles of steaming dog-poo innings was his arm injuries. Incredibly, I find myself putting him on this list without considering the disgusting contract extension we wasted on him. Ultimately Bailey earned about $100 million for 212 starts with an 89 ERA+ for the Reds. Good riddance.

      SP – Paul Wilson (2003-2005)
      This former Mets prospect never really pitched well after recovering from injuries. The Devil Rays had him a couple years, where he stunk things up. The Reds were desperate for pitching and signed him as a free agent to stink things up for us to the tune of an 86 ERA+ in 66 starts.

      SP – Jack Armstrong (1988-1991)
      I remember Armstrong well as the first guy I was screaming to trade at the deadline despite people thinking highly of him. Armstrong got off to an 11-3 start in 1990 and was named to start the All-Star Game for the NL. He was in over his head. His early season fluke fell back to earth quickly in the second half and he didn’t start a single game in the postseason. Overall, “Flap Jack” gave the Reds 72 starts with an 83 ERA+ in his four years with Cincy before washing out of the Majors.

      SP – Tim Pugh (1992-1996)
      What can I say besides telling you that this guy lived up to his name? At the ballpark, when Tim was pitching, we’d hold our noses when we said his name and pronounced it “pee-EWW”. His 82 ERA+ in 86 games was atrocious, particularly considering a that includes 31 relief appearances (where his ERA worse than his starting gigs).

      SP – Eric Milton (2005-2007)
      What happens after you lead the NL in home runs allowed? That’s right! The Reds sign you to the biggest contract they’ve ever given a pitcher to come pitch in the most homer-friendly ballpark this side of Denver. Predictably, Milton was a disaster in Red (77 ERA+ in 66 starts). This signing didn’t cost the GM his job, but it should have.

      CL – Gary Majewski (2006-2008)
      You’re probably noticing a pattern about pitching and a certain decade in Reds’ history. You’re not wrong. Majewski was the “can’t miss” prospect who was the centerpiece of the ill-fated 2006 mid-season trade of Austin Kearns and Felipe Lopez for bullpen help. Majewski was the pitcher whose medicals were falsified; we didn’t demand an alternate in the trade as a result. What we stuck with was 78 innings over 3 seasons of a 62 ERA+.

      C – Joe Oliver (1989-1997)
      Oliver was the starter for Cincinnati behind the plate for quite a while. He just wasn’t very good. There’s a reason he got replaced by a waiver wire pickup.

      1B – Todd Benzinger (1989-1991)
      A 77 OPS+ in 330 games for Cincinnati, this is the bozo we traded Nick Esasky for, which still feels wrong that it was Benzinger, not Esasky, who was the starting first baseman for the 1990 World Champions. I’ll bet Esasky could have outhit Benzinger in the early 1990s, even with his vertigo. One of the most underwhelming starting players for a World Series winner that I can remember.

      2B – Pokey Reese (1997-2001)
      This converted shortstop actually won a Gold Glove and put up a 4.0 WAR season in the Reds’ surprising 1999 challenge. Like much of that season’s success, however, it was illusory. Reese didn’t last more than two more seasons in Cincinnati. Not surprising when you consider that his D dropped off quick in his late twenties and the guy never could hit (70 OPS+).

      3B – Lenny Harris (1988-1998)
      Traded the year before the World Championship, Harris had a couple of useful seasons for the Dodgers in at the start of the new decade, but when the Reds’ re-signed him for 1994, Harris was in his thirties. He pinch hit nicely in about 100 PA that first season, but was a poor hitter over the rest of his Reds tenure. His presence always boggled my mind because Harris was a lefty who got about half the starts at third in those years and the guys he was platooning with were all lefties themselves (and better/younger players than Harris). Telling that he only got about 4,000 PA in an 18-year career. That was probably more than his skillset deserved.

      SS – Dave Concepcion (1985-1998)
      Fans who are 10 years older than me remember the slick-fielding, not-awful-hitting Davey from the salad days of the BRM. Heck, my best friend is just two years older than me, but he started watching baseball earlier than I did. What I remember is a guy who couldn’t hit and wasn’t all that exciting in the field pushing 40. Come to think of it, Tony Perez and Pete Rose matched that description, too, but at least Pete had 4,192 to keep us watching.

      LF – Skip Schumacher (2014-2015)
      Walt Jocketty largely mailed it in during the early 2010s renaissance, enjoying a roster he inherited. His signature move was to pick up former Cardinals who had previously worked for him in St. Louis. Scott Rolen, Jim Edmonds, Ryan Ludwick, etc. Schumaker was the most embarrassing one, putting up a .297 as a regular for Cincinnati before the other 29 teams also lost interest in him.

      CF – Deion Sanders (1994-2001)
      A sideshow, a PR stunt, a headache…nothing more than a glorified pinch runner. Sanders was no Bo Jackson. He did steal 94 bases for us, but Sanders was a poor man’s Billy Hamilton. The Reds’ Billy Hamilton (not the Hall of Famer).

      RF – Wily Mo Pena (2002-2005)
      At a time when top prospects Austin Kearns and Adam Dunn were already reserving the corner outfield spots, Wily Mo struggled for playing time. A well enough regarded prospect that we were able to revenge ourselves on Boston for the Benzinger trade by stealing Bronson Arroyo. Arroyo, of course, parlayed a fluke season into a long, overpaid career of average performance while endearing himself to young fans with his long, flowing locks and guitar playing. Pena never did pan out elsewhere, so his -3.3 Wins Above Average in fewer than 900 PA for Cincinnati ironically stands as his most productive years.


      Honorable Mentions
      Shogo Akiyama, Tim Birtsas, Ryan “Dumpster” Dempster, (World Series hero) Billy Hatcher, Mike Moustakas, Joe Price, Willie Taveras


      I started following the Reds just three years after the collapse of the Big Red Machine (1982). I realize, however, in researching this list that I am far more disappointed in the front office than I am in the players themselves. The talent on this team is more modest than non-existent. So many mistakes in terms of the kinds of players brought in, kept too long, over and undervalued. The Reds haven’t had a good owner since I’ve followed the team (Schott, Lindner, Castellini) and Wayne Krivsky’s short-lived and owner-interference plagued tenure was the only bright spot in the front office since Bob Quinn left in the early 90’s. Ugh.

      Still, I look forward to Toledo's informative breakdown of the Pale Hose making me feel better about my favorite franchise.

      "It is a simple matter to erect a Hall of Fame, but difficult to select the tenants." -- Ken Smith
      "I am led to suspect that some of the electorate is very dumb." -- Henry P. Edwards
      "You have a Hall of Fame to put people in, not keep people out." -- Brian Kenny
      "There's no such thing as a perfect ballot." -- Jay Jaffe

      Comment


      • #4
        Really would've thought Hatcher's October heroics in '90 would get him off your list.

        (Randon quasi-related memory that occurs to me just now...I knew a guy in school who was a huge Reds fan. I saw him at a card store about a week after that series ended and he was giddy. He was there looking for Billy's '90 Upper Deck update card which pictured him with the Reds.)
        3 6 10 21 29 31 35 41 42 44 47

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Bothrops Atrox View Post

          This is so hard - because if you remember them enough : they probably were okay enough to get enough PAs to remember. The worst players in Cardinal history the past 40 years are guys I forgot were even on the team.

          I could probably picj a team of notoriously bad disapointments, contract failures, or fallen ex-heroes.
          Yes, this is hard, because the absolute worst were guys who got 10-50 ABs in the bigs and failed utterly. I'm doing this (for myself) guys who were absolute failures in at least one White Sox full season. A notable exception is this year's contribution, Mr. Craig Kimbrel, who is absolutely the worst closer I've ever seen on the White Sox. His two month "effort" is legendarily horrid.
          The Padres should bring back Bruce Bochy as manager.
          Play the Who am I? game in trivia and you can make this signature line yours for 3 days (baseball signatures only!)

          Go here for a link to all player links! http://www.baseball-fever.com/forum/...player-threads

          Go here for all your 1920's/1930's OF info

          Comment


          • #6
            This is pretty much the 1998 Phillies. I was ten. At least my little league team was good. We really only got the Phillies on Sunday’s on WB38 (which is better than effing never).

            Catchers:
            Mike Lieberthal wasn’t below average. He was damn good. And don’t you forget it.

            Bobby Estalella wasn’t as good as his pappy but man was I a fan of this kid. Must have had some big Sunday’s.

            Johnny Estrada was close enough in name and appearance to Estalella that he got residual favoritism.

            Todd Pratt was an awesome back up and killed lefties on video games.

            Chris Coste was a 30 year old rookie who came up hot around 2009.

            Sal Fasano looked like a mob enforcer with a handlebar mustache (or Corky Miller, Chadwick). So that was fun.

            First base:
            Rico Brogna or Travis Lee or Kevin Jordan or whoever. Tomas Perez was a decent, dirty, switch hitting utility infielder.

            Second base:
            Mickey Morandini low key looks like Homer Simpson. I was glad when the Phillies got him back. Was just happy to have anyone from ‘93 back. Dave Hollins made an oft forgotten and unsuccessful return around 2003.

            Marlon Anderson was actually pretty decent with St. Louis from what I remember. He ended up being a utility player there. I was disappointed the Phillies got rid of him. He was always better on video games than in real life.

            Shortstop:
            Kevin Stocker made the most of his opportunity in 1993. He was one of the ‘93 Phil’s I constantly recognized as a 5 year old when he came on TV with Kruk, Daulton and Morandini.

            Desi Relaford was a poor man’s Anderson but thinner. He went to the Midwest and filled the same role as Anderson but for the Royals.

            Alex Arias filled in for Relaford and Anderson and did well. Was glad when he was starting.

            Third base:
            Greg Dobbs had some nice moments filling in as a lefty around 2007. Got him from the Mariners on waivers I think.

            Nick Punto was a good utility infielder that got traded to the Twins for worthless Eric Milton (Chadwick).

            Outfield:
            Wendell Magee made a nice catch once and his name sounded great when Harry Kalas said it.

            Kevin Sefcik was hanging around doing whatever.

            Ricky Jordan had a couple of cards with cool pictures I had.

            Doug Glanville is much loved by Phillies fans even though he ruined a Millwood no-hitter with an awful misplay only I remember. I watched it on a black and white antenna TV. He was decent but whatever. He wore his pants in high water fashion when it was very unfashionable so he looked like a bum.

            Bryce Aron Max Harper of course.

            Pitchers:
            Robert Person once went off with a CG and 2 HR on a Sunday. Which made this young guy’s day since Schilling wasn’t starting.

            Paul Byrd really let me down his second year. But the ‘Byrd’s Nest’ was fun and I rooted for him his whole career.

            Jonathan Pettibone gave me some nice starts when I needed them around 2014.

            Carlos Silva was promising and good for Minnesota after the Milton trade.

            Joe Roa ended up in Minnesota too. He didn’t do much anywhere but I liked the guy.

            Ricky Botallico was signed from a beer league softball team. My friends and I had endless fun recreating him getting pummeled by Bonds in homeroom.

            Wayne Gomes had a memorable name.

            Paul Spoljaric had an even more memorable name. There were a lot of “self pleasure” jokes made around his name at this time.

            Jose Mesa had that blue glove and Vizquel backstory.

            Chad Ogea and Nelson Figueroa both looked like they were 14 years old.
            Last edited by bluesky5; 11-25-2021, 11:42 AM.
            "No matter how great you were once upon a time — the years go by, and men forget,” - W. A. Phelon in Baseball Magazine in 1915. “Ross Barnes, forty years ago, was as great as Cobb or Wagner ever dared to be. Had scores been kept then as now, he would have seemed incomparably marvelous.”

            Comment


            • #7
              As a Phillies fan since the early 80s, this is incredibly difficult. So many bad players have come through here. Bluesky's post doesn't even scratch the surface. How could you forget Michael Martinez, Ronn Reynolds, Don Carman, Wally Ritchie, Sil Capusano, Jim Vatcher, Matt Kata, Cody Ransom, Russell Branyon, Jose DeJesus, Mike "The Hit Man" Easler, Lance Parrish, Gregg Jeffries, "Starvin" Marvin Freeman, Jeff Juden, Randy Ready, Juan Bell, Steve Jeltz, Greg Legg, Steve Lake, Todd Zeile.

              The list can go on and on and on and on.......
              See ball, hit ball.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by PhilliesPhan22 View Post
                As a Phillies fan since the early 80s, this is incredibly difficult. So many bad players have come through here. Bluesky's post doesn't even scratch the surface. How could you forget Michael Martinez, Ronn Reynolds, Don Carman, Wally Ritchie, Sil Capusano, Jim Vatcher, Matt Kata, Cody Ransom, Russell Branyon, Jose DeJesus, Mike "The Hit Man" Easler, Lance Parrish, Gregg Jeffries, "Starvin" Marvin Freeman, Jeff Juden, Randy Ready, Juan Bell, Steve Jeltz, Greg Legg, Steve Lake, Todd Zeile.

                The list can go on and on and on and on.......
                Manuel was awesome but I’ll never understand the obsession with Michael Martinez. I’ll never forget Rajai Davis was up in the 9th with 2 out in the 2016 World Series. He was choked up and fouled one off and I said he knows what he’s doing and called his hit back up the middle. Then Martinez came up and I called it that the World Series was over. Freaking Martinez
                "No matter how great you were once upon a time — the years go by, and men forget,” - W. A. Phelon in Baseball Magazine in 1915. “Ross Barnes, forty years ago, was as great as Cobb or Wagner ever dared to be. Had scores been kept then as now, he would have seemed incomparably marvelous.”

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by PhilliesPhan22 View Post
                  As a Phillies fan since the early 80s, this is incredibly difficult. So many bad players have come through here. Bluesky's post doesn't even scratch the surface. How could you forget Michael Martinez, Ronn Reynolds, Don Carman, Wally Ritchie, Sil Capusano, Jim Vatcher, Matt Kata, Cody Ransom, Russell Branyon, Jose DeJesus, Mike "The Hit Man" Easler, Lance Parrish, Gregg Jeffries, "Starvin" Marvin Freeman, Jeff Juden, Randy Ready, Juan Bell, Steve Jeltz, Greg Legg, Steve Lake, Todd Zeile.

                  The list can go on and on and on and on.......
                  Don Carman was one of "those guys" for me, who I must have pulled his baseball card from a wax pack a dozen times a year.
                  "It is a simple matter to erect a Hall of Fame, but difficult to select the tenants." -- Ken Smith
                  "I am led to suspect that some of the electorate is very dumb." -- Henry P. Edwards
                  "You have a Hall of Fame to put people in, not keep people out." -- Brian Kenny
                  "There's no such thing as a perfect ballot." -- Jay Jaffe

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Chadwick View Post
                    Don Carman was one of "those guys" for me, who I must have pulled his baseball card from a wax pack a dozen times a year.
                    Don Carman and Rick Schu.
                    See ball, hit ball.

                    Comment

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