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  • Historical Coincidences

    https://www.sportingnews.com/us/mlb/...21pvapcihog976

    Relatively amazing



    ♦ Cecil Fielder made his MLB debut at 21 years old in 1985, but struggled to find consistent at-bats or production with the Blue Jays and spent the 1989 season playing in Japan, where he slugged 38 homers in 106 games. The Tigers brought him back to the majors for 1990, and he spent the next seven years as one of the most feared power hitters in the bigs.

    His son, Prince, made his MLB debut at 21 years old in 2005. Unlike his dad, he was an immediate star in the big leagues, but his career ended at 32 years old when a neck injury that required spinal fusion surgery left him unable to play baseball.

    Both Cecil and Prince finished with exactly 319 career home runs.

    Both had one season with a home run total in the 50s, one season with a home run total in the 40s and four seasons with a home run total in the 30s.

    Oh, and for both father and son, exactly 40 percent of their hits in their career went for extra bases, and exactly 22 percent of the balls they put in play were line drives. And then, there’s this bit of jaw-dropping info …



    Prince Fielder & Cecil Fielder each hit 319 career HR

    Did you know they ALSO matched each other with: - 97 2-out HR - 49 4th-inning HR - 29 5th-inning HR - 18 9th-inning HR each!


  • #2
    Does this fit here. If I recall Stan Musial's career hits, same number home and away.

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    • #3
      Speaking of Musial...pretty coincidental that a town with around 10,000 people (Donoro PA) would produce two historicaly great players (and Griffey Jr). And thy also share the same birthdate.
      1885 1886 1926 1931 1934 1942 1944 1946 1964 1967 1982 2006 2011

      1887 1888 1928 1930 1943 1968 1985 1987 2004 2013

      1996 2000 2001 2002 2005 2009 2012 2014 2015


      The Top 100 Pitchers In MLB History
      The Top 100 Position Players In MLB History

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      • #4
        Originally posted by GoslinFan View Post
        https://www.sportingnews.com/us/mlb/...21pvapcihog976

        Relatively amazing



        ♦ Cecil Fielder made his MLB debut at 21 years old in 1985, but struggled to find consistent at-bats or production with the Blue Jays and spent the 1989 season playing in Japan, where he slugged 38 homers in 106 games. The Tigers brought him back to the majors for 1990, and he spent the next seven years as one of the most feared power hitters in the bigs.

        His son, Prince, made his MLB debut at 21 years old in 2005. Unlike his dad, he was an immediate star in the big leagues, but his career ended at 32 years old when a neck injury that required spinal fusion surgery left him unable to play baseball.

        Both Cecil and Prince finished with exactly 319 career home runs.

        Both had one season with a home run total in the 50s, one season with a home run total in the 40s and four seasons with a home run total in the 30s.

        Oh, and for both father and son, exactly 40 percent of their hits in their career went for extra bases, and exactly 22 percent of the balls they put in play were line drives. And then, there’s this bit of jaw-dropping info …



        Prince Fielder & Cecil Fielder each hit 319 career HR

        Did you know they ALSO matched each other with: - 97 2-out HR - 49 4th-inning HR - 29 5th-inning HR - 18 9th-inning HR each!
        Like father, like son.
        They call me Mr. Baseball. Not because of my love for the game; because of all the stitches in my head.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Bothrops Atrox View Post
          Speaking of Musial...pretty coincidental that a town with around 10,000 people (Donoro PA) would produce two historicaly great players (and Griffey Jr). And thy also share the same birthdate.
          The 1994 MVPs, Frank Thomas and Jeff Bagwell, were born on the same day (May 27, 1968).
          The 1963 home run leaders in the NL were Hank Aaron and Willie McCovey. They each hit 44 homers, and they both wore uniform #44.
          HOF relief pitcher Hoyt Wilhelm hit a home run in his first MLB at bat. He played for 22 years and never hit another one.
          Brooks Robinson hit into four triple plays in his career.
          Speaking of triple plays, there have only been 15 unassisted triple plays in 150 years of MLB history, and two of them came on successive days in 1927.
          Then there wasn't another one for 41 years.
          They call me Mr. Baseball. Not because of my love for the game; because of all the stitches in my head.

          Comment


          • #6
            Well I think father and son Bonds are the youngest people to arrive to 300/300 .
            Also if there were a 300 homers 400 steals club, I think they are the only 2 members

            Comment


            • #7
              Khris Davis batting exactly .247 for four consecutive seasons, from 2015-2018 strikes me as historically coincidental.
              "It is a simple matter to erect a Hall of Fame, but difficult to select the tenants." -- Ken Smith
              "I am led to suspect that some of the electorate is very dumb." -- Henry P. Edwards
              "You have a Hall of Fame to put people in, not keep people out." -- Brian Kenny
              "There's no such thing as a perfect ballot." -- Jay Jaffe

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Chadwick View Post
                Khris Davis batting exactly .247 for four consecutive seasons, from 2015-2018 strikes me as historically coincidental.
                His average from 2013-2018 rounds up to .248, but the real number is .2479823. Besides his four .247 seasons in that range, he had .244 & .279 seasons.

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                • #9
                  Adam Dunn hitting 40 hrs 4 years in a row.

                  Griffey Jr with these back-to-back seasons:

                  2b-3b-hr-rbi-bb-so

                  1997 - 34-3-56-147-76-121
                  1998 - 33-3-56-146-76-121


                  The Thomas-Bagwell one is easily my favorite because of how similar their MVP seasons were, and how similar their careers were. So weird.
                  scottmitchell74
                  Registered User
                  Last edited by scottmitchell74; 01-14-2022, 08:43 AM.

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                  • #10
                    The batter Tom Seaver faced most in his career was Lou Brock, and the pitcher Lou Brock faced most in his career was Tom Seaver. They died within a week of each other.
                    Put it in the books.

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                    • #11
                      Steve Garvey was playing first base when Hank Aaron broke Babe Ruth's home run record in 1974. Eleven years later Garvey was also playing first base when Pete Rose broke Ty Cobb's hit record.
                      Strikeouts are boring! Besides that, they're fascist. Throw some ground balls - it's more democratic.-Crash Davis

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                      • #12
                        One of the cool ones in the article was that Nolan Ryan faced three eventual HR champs in Maris, McGwire, and Bonds and didn't allow a single homerun by either.

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                        • #13
                          The San Diego Padres’ greatest hitter, probably greatest player, Tony Gwynn wore #19.

                          When the great Ted Williams played for the PCL Padres, his uniform number was #19.
                          NY Sports Day Independent Gotham Sports Coverage
                          Mets360 Mets Past, Present and Future
                          Talking Mets Baseball. A baseball blog with a Mets bias

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