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  • Frank Thomas Thread

    Anyone think Thomas deserves his own thread? I think he does, especially since he's my favorite active player.

    some info on thomas:
    Frank Edward Thomas...was signed by Danny Monzon and Mike Rizzo...has three children: Sterling Edward, Sloan Alexandra and Sydney Blake...signed a football scholarship with Auburn in 1986...played only as a freshman, catching three passes for 45 yards as a tight end...played baseball at Auburn and left holding the school record for career home runs (49) and single-season record for walks (73) and home runs (21)...named Southeastern Conference MVP in 1989 and was an All-SEC Tournament selection...selected to The Sporting News 1989 All-America Team...led the SEC in batting (.403) and RBI (83) and finished second in home runs (19)...named First-Team All-SEC first baseman in 1988...led the SEC with a .385 average...named the designated hitter on Baseball America's Modern Era College All-Star Team...selected to Baseball America's Freshman All-America Team and First-Team All-SEC in 1987...member of the U.S. Pan-Am Team...graduate of Columbus (Ga.) High School...made a cameo appearance in the 1992 film, "Mr. Baseball", starring Tom Selleck...appeared in an episode of "Married...With Children" in November 1994...started Chicago business, Big Hurt Enterprises, after the 1994 season to handle fan mail and his Foundation's efforts...established the Frank Thomas Charitable Foundation in 1993 to improve the lives of Chicago-area residents...activities have included a golf tournament, dinner gala, memorabilia auction, autograph event and Big Hurt merchandise sale...created "Big Hurt's Buddies" program to supply hundreds of free tickets to fans...donates $50,000 annually to the Leukemia Society of America in memory of a younger sister who passed away from the disease when he was 10...introduced own candy bar, the "Frank Thomas Bar", in February 1996 to assist fund-raising efforts of various schools, youth groups and community organizations.

    http://mlb.mlb.com/team/player_caree...ayer_id=123245

    career stats:http://www.baseball-reference.com/t/thomafr04.shtml




  • #2
    if anyone has any better or harder to find information on thomas like on proquest or something id appreciate if you posted it.

    Comment


    • #3
      thomas growing up

      Frank Edward Thomas, Jr., was born on May 27, 1968, in Columbus, Georgia, to Frank Thomas Sr. and Charlie Mae Thomas. Frank's father was a deacon at the local Baptist Church, but he also worked for the city to bring in some extra money for the family. Thomas' mother worked in a local fabric factory, and although their kids grew up in a poor neighborhood, Thomas' parents raised him and his five brothers and sisters under strict rules to keep their kids out of trouble.

      As a child, Thomas already showed the signs of being an outstanding athlete. Warned to avoid trouble, he often participated in sports at the local Boys Club, playing baseball, basketball and football. He was good enough that they soon moved him up to play organized sports with kids two to three years his senior. Thomas was an imposing presence, large (some say chubby), and his reputation with a bat even then caused kids to panic. They'd "throw the ball behind him, over the backstop, all over the place," his dad recalled in a Sports Illustrated article. "They'd do anything to avoid pitching to him."

      Not immune to pain, however, Thomas saw his two-year-old sister Pamela grow sick and die of leukemia when he was still a young boy. After he turned professional, he would establish the Frank Thomas Foundation, in 1993, to raise money to find a cure for the disease. The suddenness of his sister's death frightened Thomas, who, on Thanksgiving Day in 1977 vowed that, in Pamela's honor, he would become a professional baseball player.
      http://sports.jrank.org/pages/4791/T...rowing-Up.html

      Frank Thomas - Chronology

      1968 Born May 27, in Columbus, Georgia
      1977 Convinces father to let him play football in Pop Warner league (a league for twelve-year-olds)
      1977 Younger sister Pam (two years old) dies of Leukemia
      1986 Graduates High School and isn't drafted by any major league team
      1986 Accepts scholarship to play football at Auburn
      1987 Plays baseball for the U.S. Pan American Team and plays in Pan Am Games
      1989 White Sox draft Frank Thomas with the 7th pick in the draft
      1990 Called up to the Majors after spending a short time in the minors
      1992 Crushes home run more than 450 feet
      1992 Marries Elise Silver, daughter of a minor league baseball team owner. Frank and Elise will have two children
      1993 Voted into his first All-Star spot
      1993 Starts the Frank Thomas Charitable Foundation, which contributes to Leukemia Society of America
      1994 Hits .452 in May, with twelve home runs; wins second straight American League MVP
      1994 Major League Baseball season ends early on players strike, cutting short Thomas' phenomenal season
      1996 Becomes the White Sox career home run leader
      1997 Reaches base fifteen straight times, one short of major league record
      2001 Injured during game against Mariners on April 27 and out for rest of season
      2002 Renegotiates contract with White Sox after testy period in which it looked like Thomas might move to another team
      http://sports.jrank.org/pages/4794/T...hronology.html

      Comment


      • #4
        Frank Thomas, White Sox' 1B, 1991-94---BB Reference --------------------As' 1B, 2006----------------------------White Sox' 1B, 1991-94

        --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Frank's Relative Stats:

        Thomas------Rel.BA-----Rel.Onbase-----Rel.Slg.-------OPS+-----Rel.ISO+
        ---------------113.0------127.3 (9th)---135.3 (23rd)---157 (19th)---168.3 (51st)

        How Frank did in our 3 rounds of Greatest Position Players:

        leecemark; October 30, 2004, 08:01 AM
        --Congratulations to Lou Gehrig for his easy and well deserved win here. Foxx was just as easy a second place winner. The big question was who is the third best firstbaseman of all time and our group selected Hank Greenberg for that spot. The most debated issue was whether George Sisler was an all time great or an all time overrated player. The majority here tended to vote closer to great than overrated, as Sisler was voted into the 5th slot. Here are the top 10.

        1. Lou Gehrig 129
        2. Jimmie Foxx 115
        3. Hank Greenberg 67.5
        4. Johnny Mize 60
        5. George Sisler 50
        6. Jeff Bagwell 37
        7. Willie McCovey 36
        8. Frank Thomas 35.5
        9. Mark McGwire 35
        10. Dan Brouthers 32

        --I was surprised by the lack of support for Eddie Murray who has better counting numbers than pretty much all these guys. Of course, he wasn't quite as good at his peak as any of them and nowhere near as good as some of them. I also was surprised by Harmon Killebrew's low vote totals. He is pretty similar to the McCovey, Thomas, McGwire group and probably more consistent over the course of his career than any of them. Also, while Killebrew wasn't a great defender, he was probably the best of that group (maybe the best baserunner too, although that is a dubious distinction here).
        ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
        538280; October 29, 07:05 AM
        The results are now in. We had 18 ballots, and Lou Gehrig was a near unanimous #1 with 17 first place votes (there was also one first place vote for George Sisler). After the automatic two of Gehrig and Foxx, Frank Thomas claimed the #3 spot, and was closely followed by Jeff Bagwell at #4. Here are the final results (first place votes in parenthesis):

        1. Lou Gehrig-213 (17)
        2. Jimmie Foxx-159
        3. Frank Thomas-96
        4. Jeff Bagwell-94
        5. Hank Greenberg-79
        6. Eddie Murray-54
        7. Johnny Mize-53
        8. Willie McCovey-51
        9. George Sisler-40 (1)
        10. Cap Anson-28
        11. Buck Leonard-23
        12. Harmon Killebrew-20

        No one else received more than 20 points. I'll now get the second basemen poll up.
        ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Bill Burgess; April 22, 2007, 02:45 PM

        1. Lou Gehrig - 150 points
        2. Jimmy Foxx - 141
        3. Jeff Bagwell - 98
        4. Hank Greenberg - 65
        5. Johnny Mize - 57
        6. Willie McCovey - 53
        7. Frank Thomas - 53
        8. George Sisler - 42
        9. Cap Anson - 32
        10. Eddie Murray - 25
        11. Harmon Killebrew - 24
        12. Dan Brouthers - 20
        13. Bill Terry - 15
        14. Mark McGwire - 12
        15. Dick Allen - 7
        16. Roger Connor - 4
        17. Jake Beckley - 4
        18. Rafael Palmeiro - 2
        -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Greatest Hitter series, conducted by Bill Burgess, ending November 4, 2007, 08:05 AM

        1. Babe Ruth---------68 votes - 95.77%
        1. Ted Williams-------68 - 95.77%
        3. Ty Cobb-----------52 - 73.24%
        4. Rogers Hornsby----36 - 50.70%
        5. Lou Gehrig---------32 - 45.07%
        6. Barry Bonds
        7. Mickey Mantle
        8. Stan Musial
        9. Hank Aaron
        10. Willie Mays
        11. Jimmy Foxx
        12. Honus Wagner
        13. Frank Thomas
        14. Tris Speaker
        15. Frank Robinson
        16. Joe DiMaggio
        17. Joe Jackson
        18. Josh Gibson
        19. Nap Lajoie
        20. Mel Ott
        21. Oscar Charleston
        22. Alexander Rodriguez
        23. Dan Brouthers
        24. Mike Schmidt
        --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Top OPS+ seasons of some prominent 1Bmen. (Minimum 500 PA, except for pre-1900, due to fewer games/season.)

        Lou Gehrig........221, 208, 203, 195, 194, 190 Average: 202
        Dan Brouthers.....206, 201, 199, 189, 187, 182 Average: 194
        Jimmie Foxx........205, 200, 188, 186, 182, 182 Average: 191
        Frank Thomas...212, 181, 180, 178, 178, 177 Average: 184
        Mark McGwire......217, 203, 178, 175, 168, 164 Average: 184
        Cap Anson..........200, 191, 180, 178, 176, 176 Average: 183 (fewer games due to era)
        Roger Connor......201, 185, 184, 176, 171, 168 Average: 181
        Willie McCovey....211, 182, 175, 165, 161, 160 Average: 176
        Dick Allen...........200, 181, 174, 166, 165, 162 Average: 175
        Jeff Bagwell........213, 179, 169, 168, 158, 152 Average: 173
        Albert Pujols.......189, 180, 175, 167, 158, 155 Average: 170
        Johnny Mize.......178, 176, 175, 172, 161, 160 Average: 170
        Hank Greenberg..172, 170, 170, 169, 163, 156 Average: 166
        Harmon Killebrew.179, 174, 161, 161, 158, 153 Average: 164
        George Sisler......181, 170, 161, 157, 154, 140 Average: 161
        Bill Terry...........158, 156, 149, 141, 137, 135 Average: 146
        Ted Kluszewski....166, 147, 145, 142, 132, 124 Average: 142
        Gil Hodges..........143, 142, 141, 138, 128, 126 Average: 136
        ------------------------------------------------------------------
        Lou Gehrig - 154.0 - 2 SLG. titles - 9954 PA - 179 OPS+ - Rel. ISO - 230. Ave. held up well, of course due to lack of decline phase, hence low PA. Only won 2 titles.
        Jimmie Foxx - 143.7 - 5 SLG. titles - 9,599 PA - 163 OPS+ - Rel. ISO - 214. Too few PA relative to Aaron/Mays
        ----------------------
        ...............OPS+....EqA.....BRAR....BRAR/650 PA
        Gehrig........179....345......1219.......82.02
        Brouthers.....170....324.......780........66.21
        Pujols..........171....343.......515........82.41
        Foxx...........163.....327......1012........68.02
        F.Thomas...160.....342......1146.......81.31
        D.Allen........156.....325.......801........71.19
        McCovey.....148.....318.......960........64.42
        -------------------------------------------------
        Relative ISO:

        Lou Gehrig: 230
        Mark McGwire: 223
        Hank Greenberg: 220
        Jimmy Foxx: 214
        Johnny Mize 209
        Dick Allen: 198
        Willie McCovey: 192
        Harmon Killebrew: 190
        Albert Pujols: 182 (6 seasons)
        Frank Howard 175
        Frank Thomas: 169
        Rafael Palmeiro: 149
        Eddie Murray: 138
        ---------------------------------------------------
        Relative ISO: Some Pre-1920 hitters:

        Dan Brouthers 178
        Roger Connor 172
        Cap Anson 121

        All-Time list for OPS+ (baseball-Reference)
        http://www.baseball-reference.com/le...s_career.shtml

        Relative Stats Chart:
        http://baseball-fever.com/showpost.p...&postcount=161
        -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Courtesy of David Kent. Here is a list of the top 100 sluggers of all time based on relative isolated power (min 5000 AB). The values are league adjusted but not park adjusted. (NB: If someone has park factor values for average and slugging, I would love to see it.)
        Code:
        Player                AB    Slg    Avg    ISO  Rel ISO
        -------------------------------------------------------
        Lou Gehrig           8001  0.632  0.340  0.292  227.6
        Hank Greenberg       5193  0.605  0.313  0.292  223.1
        Mark McGwire         6187  0.588  0.263  0.325  217.1
        Jimmie Foxx          8134  0.609  0.325  0.284  215.6
        Johnny Mize          6443  0.562  0.312  0.250  209.8
        Dick Allen           6332  0.534  0.292  0.242  199.2
        Willie McCovey       8197  0.515  0.270  0.245  192.3
        Harmon Killebrew     8147  0.509  0.256  0.252  190.8
        Dan Brouthers        6711  0.519  0.342  0.177  181.2
        Frank Howard         6488  0.499  0.273  0.225  175.3
        Roger Connor         7794  0.486  0.317  0.169  171.6
        Frank Thomas         6851  0.567  0.308  0.259  168.3
        Norm Cash            6705  0.488  0.271  0.217  165.2
        Cecil Fielder        5157  0.482  0.255  0.227  157.6
        Jeff Bagwell         7697  0.542  0.297  0.245  157.6
        Jim Bottomley        7471  0.500  0.310  0.191  156.2
        Boog Powell          6681  0.462  0.266  0.196  153.9
        -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Frank's wikipedia page
        Frank Thomas (designated hitter): From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


        Frank Edward Thomas (born May 27, 1968) is an American Major League Baseball player for the Toronto Blue Jays. He is known for his keen eye and immense power.

        Thomas became one of baseball's biggest stars in the 1990s, playing for the Chicago White Sox. He was given the nickname "The Big Hurt" by broadcaster Ken Harrelson. Thomas is one of several notable baseball players who played college baseball at Auburn University, such as Bo Jackson, who was a teammate of Thomas in the major leagues. He also played tight end for the school's football team.

        Early life and career
        Thomas was born and raised in Columbus, Georgia on the same day as fellow Major League player Jeff Bagwell (a player whose career would share several parallels to Thomas'). He attended Columbus High School and was a standout in both football and baseball. As a Columbus High School sophomore he hit cleanup for a baseball team that won a state championship. As a senior he hit .440 for the baseball team, was named an All-State tight end with the football team, and played forward with the basketball team. He wanted desperately to win a contract to play professional baseball, but he was completely overlooked in the 1986 amateur draft. Baseball teams signed some 891 players on that occasion, and Thomas was not among them.

        "I was shocked and sad," Thomas recalled in the Chicago Tribune. "I saw a lot of guys I played against get drafted, and I knew they couldn't do what I could do. But I've had people all my life saying you can't do this, you can't do that. It scars you. No matter how well I've done. People have misunderstood me for some reason. I was always one of the most competitive kids around."

        In the autumn of 1986, Thomas accepted a scholarship to play football at Auburn University. Even so, his love of baseball drew him to the Auburn baseball team, where the coach immediately recognized his potential. "We loved him," Auburn baseball coach Hal Baird told Sports Illustrated. "He was fun to be around—always smiling, always bright-eyed." He was also a deadly hitter, posting a .359 batting average and leading the Tigers in runs batted in as a freshman. During the summer of 1987 he played for the U.S. Pan American Team, earning a spot on the final roster that would compete in the Pan American Games. The Games coincided with the beginning of football practice back at Auburn, so he left the Pan Am team and returned to college—only to be injured twice in early season football games.

        Thomas might have lost his scholarship that year because he could no longer play football. Instead Auburn continued his funding, and baseball became his sole sport. He was good enough as a sophomore to win consideration for the U.S. National Team—preparing for the 1988 Summer Olympics—but he was cut from the final squad. Stung and misunderstood again, he fought back. By the end of his junior baseball season he had hit 19 home runs, 19 doubles, and had batted .403 with a slugging percentage of .801. With another amateur draft looming, the scouts began to comprehend that the big Georgia native could indeed play baseball. By his senior year (1989) he was voted the Southeastern Conference MVP in baseball, leaving the school with forty-nine career homers, a new record.

        The Chicago White Sox picked Thomas seventh in the first round of the June 1989 draft.

        Thomas played first base during the early part of his career and was not known for his defense. He never won a Gold Glove at the position, and has played primarily as a designated hitter since turning 30 years old. Rather, Thomas is known for his offensive performance; some regard him as one of the best pure hitters in baseball's history. Thomas is the only player in major league history to have seven consecutive seasons of a .300 average, and at least 100 walks, 100 runs, 100 runs batted in, and 20 home runs (from 1991 to 1997). The only other player to have more than five consecutive seasons accomplishing this feat was Ted Williams with six. This accomplishment is even more remarkable considering that despite playing only 113 games in 1994, due to the labor stoppage which curtailed that season prematurely, he still was able to attain these lofty numbers, thereby keeping the streak alive. Additionally, there are only five players in history who have both hit more home runs and have a higher career batting average than Thomas (Hank Aaron, Jimmie Foxx, Mel Ott, Babe Ruth, and Ted Williams).

        Chicago White Sox
        In Thomas's first full season, 1991, Thomas finished third in MVP voting with a .318 batting average and 32 home runs. He won the first of four Silver Slugger awards, and led the league in on-base percentage, something he has done four times. Thomas has always been one of the most patient hitters in baseball, leading the American League in walks four times. Through the end of the 2006 season, Thomas was second among all active players in walks and third in on-base percentage, and ranked among the top 20 lifetime in both categories.

        Thomas is one of only two first basemen in history to win consecutive Most Valuable Player awards in the major leagues (Hall-of-Famer Jimmie Foxx is the other, in 1932–33). Thomas accomplished this feat in the 1993 and 1994 seasons. From 1991–1997, Thomas finished in the top 10 of the MVP voting every year. In 1997, Thomas won the batting title and finished third in MVP voting. He struggled over the next two seasons, but rebounded in 2000 when he hit .328 with a career-high 43 homers and 143 runs batted in. Thomas finished second in MVP voting that season, behind Jason Giambi of the Oakland Athletics. He also won the 2000 AL Comeback Player of the Year Award.

        As a member of the White Sox, Thomas and teammate Magglio Ordóñez tied a major league record for back-to-back homers, with six in one season. Thomas has been maligned by the media, especially in Chicago due to a dropoff in his performance later in his career. Much of this came about after the 2002 season, when the White Sox invoked a "diminished skills" clause in his contract. Oddly, this came after a season in which he hit 28 home runs with 92 RBI and 88 walks, while leading the major leagues in fly ball percentage (56.9%).[1] Thomas somewhat resurrected his career in 2003; although he hit a subpar .267, he was tied for second in the American League in home runs (42), and was in the league's top ten in walks, extra-base hits, slugging percentage, and on-base plus slugging, as he led the major leagues in fly ball percentage (54.9%).[1] In 2005, Thomas hit 12 home runs despite only having 105 at-bats in 35 games, demonstrating the power that he showed earlier in his career. Adding together 2004 and 2005, he had less than 350 total at-bats because of the injuries but managed to hit 30 home runs and draw 80 walks. Thomas won a World Series title with the Chicago White Sox in 2005, but he was not on the post-season roster due to injury.

        Thomas' departure was somewhat controversial. He and White Sox General Manager Kenny Williams exchanged words before Thomas left for Oakland[citation needed], but his statistical legacy from his time in Chicago is significant. Thomas has several White Sox records to his name, including all-time leader in runs scored (1,327), home runs (448), doubles (447), RBIs (1,465), extra-base hits (906), walks (1,466), total bases (3,949), slugging percentage (.568), and on-base percentage (.427).

        Oakland Athletics
        Partially due to his recurring ankle and foot injuries, the White Sox declined to pick up the option year on Thomas' contract on December 7, 2005. However, there was some animosity in the negotiations as Thomas was called "an idiot" and "selfish" by Chicago White Sox general manager Kenny Williams in a television interview.[2] Thomas, for his part, criticized the White Sox for letting him go as a "passing by player" instead of treating him like a long-term mainstay for the team. He signed with the Oakland Athletics to a one year, $500,000 deal with incentives on January 25, 2006.[3]

        The Athletics installed Thomas as their everyday DH. He started the season slowly, but ended the season as the team leader in home runs, RBI, slugging percentage, and on-base percentage. He provided a powerful right-handed bat in the middle of the lineup for the division-leading Athletics.

        On Monday, May 22, 2006, Thomas homered twice in his first game against his former team. Before Thomas came up to lead off the 2nd inning, a musical montage played on the Jumbotron at U.S. Cellular Field, paying tribute to Thomas's legacy with the White Sox. He was cheered in his introduction by the White Sox fans. Moments later, when he hit his first home run of the night to put his former team behind in the score 1-0, he was loudly cheered along with a standing ovation.

        Thomas rejuvenated his career playing with the Athletics. Through September 26, he had 38 HRs and 109 RBIs, and was named the American League's player of the week after hitting .462 with five homers and 13 RBIs in the week ending Sept. 10.[4] He led the league in fly ball percentage (57.3%).[2] The 2006 post season provided Thomas the opportunity to play in his first postseason games since 2005, when the Athletics clinched the American League West title, defeating the Seattle Mariners, 12-3 on September 26. During the A's first playoff game on October 3, Thomas hit two solo home runs, leading the A's to a 3-2 win over the Minnesota Twins. His performance during the opening play-off game earned Thomas the distinction of being the oldest player to hit multiple home runs in a Major League Baseball postseason game.

        On October 7, 2006, he finished behind Jim Thome, the man who replaced him as the Chicago White Sox's DH, in the voting for the American League Comeback Player of the Year Award. However he was awarded with the AL players choice award for Comeback Player. He finished 4th in the vote for the American League Most Valuable Player Award.[5]

        Toronto Blue Jays
        On November 16, 2006 Thomas signed a 2-year, $18.12 million contract with the Toronto Blue Jays which was officially confirmed on November 17, 2006. According to BlueJays.com, Thomas is scheduled to make $1 million (US) in the first season (with a $9.12 million signing bonus) and $8 million in the next season. The contract includes an option for 2009 contingent on his reaching 1,050 plate appearances over the next two seasons or 525 plate appearances in his 2nd year of the contract.[6]

        Banner at Rogers Centre announcing Mr. Thomas' home run countOn June 17, 2007, Thomas hit his 496th career home run, giving him his 244th home run as a DH, breaking the record previously held by Edgar Martínez.

        On June 28, 2007, Frank Thomas hit the 500th home run of his career, becoming the 21st player in the history of Major League Baseball to do so. It was a three-run shot off Minnesota's Carlos Silva. This is also notable, as Thomas was ejected in the later innings of the game for arguing balls and strikes with the home plate umpire. The Blue Jays lost the game.

        On September 17, 2007, Frank Thomas hit three home runs in his team's 6-1 win over the Boston Red Sox. It was the second time in his career that Thomas hit three home runs in a game, the first time also against the Red Sox, on September 15, 1996, in a Chicago White Sox loss.[7][8] Knuckleballer Tim Wakefield started both games for the Red Sox, and gave up five of the six home runs Thomas hit, including all three in the first game.

        Baseball accomplishments
        On June 28, 2007, Frank Thomas became only the 21st player in Major League Baseball history to hit at least 500 home runs, after he hit a 1st inning home run at the Hubert H. Humphrey Metrodome; coincidentally Thomas hit his first home run of his career there back on August 28, 1990.[9]
        Thomas is on a short list of elite players who have hit 500 home runs while maintaining a career .300 batting average (joining Hall-of-Famers: Babe Ruth, Jimmie Foxx, Mel Ott, Ted Williams, Willie Mays, Henry Aaron, and later joined by Alex Rodriguez).
        Thomas is also on a short list of elite players to hit 500 career home runs and accrue at least 1600 Bases on Balls. The others are: Babe Ruth, Mel Ott, Mickey Mantle, Ted Williams, and Barry Bonds.
        Thomas was the first player in Major League history to win two silver slugger awards each at two different positions (1991 & 2000 at first base; 1993-94 as designated hitter).
        He was the 22nd player to win a second Most Valuable Player Award (1993 & 94). He was the first American League player to accomplish this since Roger Maris in 1960 and 1961.
        He was only the eleventh player in history to win consecutive Most Valuable Player Awards, and the first American League player to do so since Roger Maris in 1960 and 1961.
        He is one of four players (Eddie Murray, Hank Aaron, and Rafael Palmeiro) to collect over 500 career home runs and over 115 career sacrifice flies. This carries significance as some home run hitters are often chastised for putting their quest to hit home runs over a willingness to sacrifice oneself and advance the team.
        His 138 Bases on Balls in the 1991 season was not only the most accrued in a season by any American League player in the 1990s, it was the most for a season by any American League player since 1969 when Harmon Killebrew walked 145 times.
        Thomas' 0.729 slugging percentage for the shortened 1994 season was the highest season mark for an American League player since Ted Williams' 0.731 slugging percentage in 1957. Only Mark McGuire's 0.730 in 1996 has been higher since then.
        In the shortened 1994 season, Thomas achieved an On Base Percentage of 0.494 which was also the highest season mark for an American League player since Ted Williams' 0.528 on base percentage in 1957. No American League player has topped this since.
        Currently the all-time record holder for home runs by a designated hitter
        Currently ranks 18th with career 513 HRs.
        Currently ranks 22nd with career 1,674 RBIs.
        Currently ranks 20th with a .561 career slugging percentage.
        Currently ranks 5th with 120 career sacrifice flies. He is the only player in Major League history to hit over 90 sacrifice flies, and not collect a single sacrifice hit.[3]

        Appearances in the media
        Thomas appeared in the movie Mr. Baseball (as a hot-prospect rookie who forces Tom Selleck's character off the Yankees) and made a guest appearance (as himself) on the TV show Married With Children.

        In 1995, a Super NES baseball video game titled Frank Thomas' Big Hurt Baseball was released for home video game play, and Premier Technologies created a "Big Hurt" pinball machine, marketed under the Gottlieb trade name).[10]

        In 2007, he appeared in a promotional advertisement for the Toronto Blue Jays, in which he engages in a pillow fight with children. This ad drew the criticism of the Television Bureau of Canada, who requested a "Dramatization. Do not try this at home." disclaimer be placed on the ad. A similar warning was placed on teammate A.J. Burnett's commercial.[4] The Blue Jays, humorously, have now scheduled a "Frank Thomas Kid's Pillow" promotion for September 2, 2007. [5]

        Advocate for drug testing
        As early as 1995, Thomas was advocating drug testing for professional baseball players.[11] After hitting his 500th home run, Thomas stated, "It means a lot to me because I did it the right way," alluding to Barry Bonds's then-present pursuit of Hank Aaron's career home run record.[12] Thomas was the only active baseball player to be interviewed during the preparation of the Mitchell Report. He did so voluntarily.

        See also
        MLB players who have hit 30 or more home runs before the All-Star break
        DHL Hometown Heroes
        List of Major League Baseball Home Run Records
        500 home run club
        Top 500 home run hitters of all time
        List of major league players with 2,000 hits
        List of Major League Baseball players with 400 doubles
        List of Major League Baseball players with 1000 runs
        List of Major League Baseball RBI Records
        List of Major League Baseball players with 1000 RBI
        List of Major League Baseball batting champions
        List of Major League Baseball runs scored champions
        List of Major League Baseball doubles champions
        Major League Baseball hitters with three home runs in one game
        Chicago White Sox all-time roster

        References
        Statistics provided by Stats, Inc. (2007-01-02). 2006 Batted Ball Statistics. FanGraphs.com. Retrieved on 2007-04-15.
        ChiSox GM Williams bashes "idiot" Thomas
        Former ChiSox slugger agrees to 1-year deal with A's
        Thomas named AL Player of the Week
        Frank Thomas Statistics - Baseball-Reference.com
        Big signing: Jays ink Thomas
        September 15, 1996 Chicago White Sox at Boston Red Sox Play by Play and Box Score - Baseball-Reference.com
        September 17, 2007 Boston Red Sox at Toronto Blue Jays Box Score and Play by Play - Baseball-Reference.com
        Frank Thomas hits career Home Run #500
        Internet Pinball Machine Database: Premier 'Big Hurt'
        "Steroids in Baseball? Say it Ain't So, Bud", Sporting News, July 24, 1995, p. 26
        Thomas Launches No. 500 at Metrodome

        External links
        Career statistics and player information from MLB, or ESPN, or Baseball-Reference, or Fangraphs, or The Baseball Cube
        IMDb: Frank Thomas (II)
        The Pillow fight commercial for the Toronto Blue Jays
        The Blue Jays honor Frank Thomas for his 500th home run
        The Chicago White Sox tribute video in honor of Frank Thomas' 500th home run
        Last edited by Bill Burgess; 05-14-2009, 06:07 PM.

        Comment


        • #5
          Frank Thomas '91 got me to start thinking more and more about percentages rather than raw stats, and from '93-'97 showed us a run of percentages that had not been seen for 50 years.

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          • #6
            The "Right Handed Ted Williams"!
            Strikeouts are boring! Besides that, they're fascist. Throw some ground balls - it's more democratic.-Crash Davis

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            • #7
              Originally posted by [email protected] View Post
              Frank Thomas, White Sox' 1B, 1991-94---BB Reference --------------------As' 1B, 2006----------------------------White Sox' 1B, 1991-94
              [ATTACH]35369[/ATTACH]
              --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
              Frank's Relative Stats:

              Thomas------Rel.BA-----Rel.Onbase-----Rel.Slg.-------OPS+-----Rel.ISO+
              ---------------113.0------127.3 (9th)---135.3 (23rd)---157 (19th)---168.3 (51st)

              How Frank did in our 3 rounds of Greatest Position Players:

              leecemark; October 30, 2004, 08:01 AM
              --Congratulations to Lou Gehrig for his easy and well deserved win here. Foxx was just as easy a second place winner. The big question was who is the third best firstbaseman of all time and our group selected Hank Greenberg for that spot. The most debated issue was whether George Sisler was an all time great or an all time overrated player. The majority here tended to vote closer to great than overrated, as Sisler was voted into the 5th slot. Here are the top 10;

              1. Lou Gehrig 129
              2. Jimmie Foxx 115
              3. Hank Greenberg 67.5
              4. Johnny Mize 60
              5. George Sisler 50
              6. Jeff Bagwell 37
              7. Willie McCovey 36
              8. Frank Thomas 35.5
              9. Mark McGwire 35
              10. Dan Brouthers 32
              --I was surprised by the lack of support for Eddie Murray who has better counting numbers than pretty much all these guys. Of course, he wasn't quite as good at his peak as any of them and nowhere near as good as some of them. I also was surprised by Harmon Killebrew's low vote totals. He is pretty similar to the McCovey, Thomas, McGwire group and probably more consistent over the course of his career than any of them. Also, while Killebrew wasn't a great defender, he was probably the best of that group (maybe the best baserunner too, although that is a dubious distinction here).
              ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
              538280; October 29, 07:05 AM
              The results are now in. We had 18 ballots, and Lou Gehrig was a near unanimous #1 with 17 first place votes (there was also one first place vote for George Sisler). After the automatic two of Gehrig and Foxx, Frank Thomas claimed the #3 spot, and was closely followed by Jeff Bagwell at #4. Here are the final results (first place votes in parenthesis):

              1. Lou Gehrig-213 (17)
              2. Jimmie Foxx-159
              3. Frank Thomas-96
              4. Jeff Bagwell-94
              5. Hank Greenberg-79
              6. Eddie Murray-54
              7. Johnny Mize-53
              8. Willie McCovey-51
              9. George Sisler-40 (1)
              10. Cap Anson-28
              11. Buck Leonard-23
              12. Harmon Killebrew-20

              No one else received more than 20 points. I'll now get the second basemen poll up.
              ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
              Bill Burgess; April 22, 2007, 02:45 PM
              OK. This survey poll/survey is now closed. Except for HDH, the last ranking was offered on Monday, April 16, 6 whole days ago.

              And here are our results. I just finished tabulating them. I awarded 10 points for 1st place, 9 for 2nd place, and so forth.

              1. Lou Gehrig - 150 points
              2. Jimmy Foxx - 141
              3. Jeff Bagwell - 98
              4. Hank Greenberg - 65
              5. Johnny Mize - 57
              6. Willie McCovey - 53
              7. Frank Thomas - 53
              8. George Sisler - 42
              9. Cap Anson - 32
              10. Eddie Murray - 25
              11. Harmon Killebrew - 24
              12. Dan Brouthers - 20
              13. Bill Terry - 15
              14. Mark McGwire - 12
              15. Dick Allen - 7
              16. Roger Connor - 4
              17. Jake Beckley - 4
              18. Rafael Palmeiro - 2
              -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
              Frank's wikipedia page
              Frank Thomas (designated hitter): From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
              nice information, thanks!
              Last edited by Bill Burgess; 02-11-2008, 10:15 AM.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by fenrir View Post
                nice information, thanks!
                You're welcome!

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                • #9

                  ...................................
                  My top 10 players:

                  1. Babe Ruth
                  2. Barry Bonds
                  3. Ty Cobb
                  4. Ted Williams
                  5. Willie Mays
                  6. Alex Rodriguez
                  7. Hank Aaron
                  8. Honus Wagner
                  9. Lou Gehrig
                  10. Mickey Mantle

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                  • #10
                    It's really a shame he declined so much in the 2000s. Much like with Griffey, that sort of tarnishes his overall legacy. But man, in the 1990s, he was incredible.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Cowtipper View Post
                      It's really a shame he declined so much in the 2000s. Much like with Griffey, that sort of tarnishes his overall legacy. But man, in the 1990s, he was incredible.
                      I think most guys declining in their early 30s a lot tend to become a Little underrated. Pujols could face the same fate if he really sticks around till his contract is over. a decline is normal but when you stick around almost a decade at a much lower Level that sticks into the brain of People.

                      late peakers like beltre are the opposite, they tend to be remembered even better than they were.
                      I now have my own non commercial blog about training for batspeed and power using my training experience in baseball and track and field.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Thomas was aged 35-39 in 2003 to 2007. He had an OPS+ of 139 which happens to be the 11th highest for any player aged 35-39 since 1947. (He did this by the way when his OPS+ rate was undoubtedly lower due to PED users.) Musial was 141 Mays was 139, Schmidt and McCovey were 138, all of which apparently have tarnished images for not performing at 35-39 they way they did at 25-29.

                        Of course in 1998-2000, Thomas "declined" when he "only" had an OPS+ of 139. That looks pretty bad unless you recall the fact that at least 9 of the 23 people ahead of him were on steroids.

                        And in 2003-2007, Thomas, at aged 35-39, was 9th in MLB in OPS+ once you remove the 4 known steroid users.


                        Ninth at age 35-39. Is that a shameful performance?

                        If so, we should remember that when we discuss Musial (who was 10th in MLB at age 35-39), Schmidt or McCovey (who were 12th) or Mays (who was 15th.)
                        Last edited by drstrangelove; 11-16-2015, 11:48 AM.
                        "It's better to look good, than be good."

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Dss
                          Originally posted by drstrangelove View Post
                          Thomas was aged 35-39 in 2003 to 2007. He had an OPS+ of 139 which happens to be the 11th highest for any player aged 35-39 since 1947. (He did this by the way when his OPS+ rate was undoubtedly lower due to PED users.) Musial was 141 Mays was 139, Schmidt and McCovey were 138, all of which apparently have tarnished images for not performing at 35-39 they way they did at 25-29.

                          Of course in 1998-2000, Thomas "declined" when he "only" had an OPS+ of 139. That looks pretty bad unless you recall the fact that at least 9 of the 23 people ahead of him were on steroids.

                          And in 2003-2007, Thomas, at aged 35-39, was 9th in MLB in OPS+ once you remove the 4 known steroid users.


                          Ninth at age 35-39. Is that a shameful performance?

                          If so, we should remember that when we discuss Musial (who was 10th in MLB at age 35-39), Schmidt or McCovey (who were 12th) or Mays (who was 15th.)
                          He was not really bad, he just missed a lot of games.
                          I now have my own non commercial blog about training for batspeed and power using my training experience in baseball and track and field.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            We have a Frank Thomas General Thread as well.
                            Strikeouts are boring! Besides that, they're fascist. Throw some ground balls - it's more democratic.-Crash Davis

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by dominik View Post
                              Dss

                              He was not really bad, he just missed a lot of games.
                              100% agree, but I was responding (over reacting? :dismay to the "shameful" comment, because I've seen it posted before in other threads. Also I've seen the comment that he had a major or atypical decline. He in fact was great as I think the stats demonstrate and had less of a decline than many other greats.


                              There's nothing shameful about being great when you do play, but not playing when you are either injured, ill or in the service.
                              Last edited by drstrangelove; 11-16-2015, 11:42 PM.
                              "It's better to look good, than be good."

                              Comment

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