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  • Originally posted by yanks0714 View Post

    Was Cleveland a hard park to hit HRs in? Was it League Park or Municipal Stadium?
    Here's Municipal Stadium, where he played the second half of his career in road games against Cleveland. They drastically reduced the dimensions in 1947, moving left-center and right center in by 55 feet each!!!! They wanted to increase attendance and homers, and it worked. They led the AL in homers in 1948 and won the pennant, and after being in the bottom half in homers perenially before the park changes, they were at or near the top every year. With guys like Gordon, Doby, Rosen, and Easter coming into the lineup, I think it played a big part in them becoming a perenially pennant contender.
    Attached Files

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    • The RBI Machine

      P. 148, Baseball Greatest Sluggers (Schell)

      "Joe DiMaggio ranks as the third best RBI man in baseball history. Being a right handed hitter in Yankee Stadium cost DiMaggio quite a few home runs. As park effect estimation continues to improve, it will be useful to obtain seperate park factors for right and left handed hitters. When that day comes and given the asymmetry of Yankee Stadium, I would not be surprised to see DiMaggio supplant Ruth as the best RBI producer in the game's history."

      Comment


      • Originally posted by csh19792001 View Post
        P. 148, Baseball Greatest Sluggers (Schell)

        "Joe DiMaggio ranks as the third best RBI man in baseball history. Being a right handed hitter in Yankee Stadium cost DiMaggio quite a few home runs. As park effect estimation continues to improve, it will be useful to obtain seperate park factors for right and left handed hitters. When that day comes and given the asymmetry of Yankee Stadium, I would not be surprised to see DiMaggio supplant Ruth as the best RBI producer in the game's history."
        I think he's a better RBI hitter simply because he combined power/contact hitting, and while he was not immune to the doubleplay, did fairly well at avoiding it.

        What impresses me greatly about DiMaggio in '41 is his efficiency at the plate. He struck out 13 times all year in 541 at-bats as an upper-echelon power hitter, went a month during the streak without striking out, and grounded into the double play 6 times all year, despite batting from the right side of the plate! Lost in the myriad of talents he possessed, is that he was very fast and very instinctive, and very often beat out any play to the right of the shortstop.

        With that in mind, considering that the common detractor of contact hitting is DP'ing, I have to believe he hit more RBI that year than he should have in '41 and in many other years (and along with OYS, I would say that's another thing that underrates his hitting.)

        PS...... I hear that the Schell book has the handedness-adjusted OPS+ numbers. Would you happen to have DiMaggio's at hand?
        Last edited by DiMag4Life; 02-25-2008, 05:08 PM.

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        • Originally posted by DiMag4Life View Post
          I think he's a better RBI hitter simply because he combined power/contact hitting, and while he was not immune to the doubleplay, did fairly well at avoiding it.

          What impresses me greatly about DiMaggio in '41 is his efficiency at the plate. He struck out 13 .. I hear that the Schell book has the handedness-adjusted OPS+ numbers. Would you happen to have DiMaggio's at hand?

          I may have to dig deeper in to Schell's book. At a quick glance I see Joe's adjusted OPS not OPS+ and not broken down LH and RH hitters, they both lumped together.
          He actually has Joe at .942 thats adjusted OPS and puts him at 14th on the all time list. Joe's actual OPS was .977 I can't find Joe's Adjusted OBA because the cut off in the book is .380 which means he has Joe at below .380 So he lowered Joe's adjusted OBA which was actually .398. He did add a few points in calculating Joe's adjusted slugging percentage. Actual .579 and adjusted .582.

          Even though Joe's adjusted OBA is not listed we can figure that out, simple math. He has Joe's adjusted OPS at .942 minus his adjusted slugging at .582 gives us . 360 adjusted OBA. No idea why he has Joe's adjusted OBA lower than his actual but in the end that gave Joe a lower adjusted OPS


          Maybe easier to understand this way.

          -------------------Slugging---------OBA--------------OPS
          Actual--------------.579------------.398-------------.977
          Schell adjusted-----.582------------.360-------------.942
          Last edited by SHOELESSJOE3; 02-25-2008, 06:28 PM.

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          • PCL Minor League Batting Statistics:

            Code:
            [B]
            1932:[/B]
            
            Games: 3
            At-bats: 9
            Runs: 2
            Hits: 2
            2B: 1
            3B: 1
            Home runs: 0
            RBI: 2
            AVG: .222
            SLG: .555
            [B]
            1933: [/B]
            
            Games: 187
            At-bats: 762
            Runs: 129
            Hits: 295
            2B: 45
            3B: 13
            Home runs: 28
            RBI: 169
            AVG: .340
            SLG: .580
            
            [B]1934:[/B]
            
            Games: 101
            At-bats: 375
            Runs: 58
            Hits: 128
            2B: 18
            3B: 6
            Home runs: 12
            RBI: 69
            AVG: .341
            SLG: .517
            [B]
            1935:[/B]
            
            Games: 172
            At-bats: 679
            Runs: 173
            Hits: 270
            2B: 58
            3B: 18
            Home runs: 34
            RBI: 154
            AVG: .398
            SLG: .687



            (OBP. unavailable)
            Last edited by DiMag4Life; 02-25-2008, 07:35 PM.

            Comment


            • Originally posted by SHOELESSJOE3 View Post
              Maybe easier to understand this way.

              -------------------Slugging---------OBA--------------OPS
              Actual--------------.579------------.398-------------.977
              Schell adjusted-----.582------------.360-------------.942
              These numbers are a bit misleading, though...it looks like Joe is getting brought back to earth, when in fact the opposite is the case....

              Dimaggio's adjusted OPS is roughly on par with McGwire, Joe Jackson, Foxx, and Wagner. He's ahead of people like Manny Ramirez, Frank Robinson, and Frank Thomas.

              I think it should be noted that everyone who played in the big offensive eras take a huge hit. It's adjusted to a 1976-92 context, using standard deviation based adjustments, not just mean based adjustments (as in "relative batting average").

              For instance, Ruth comes out #1 all time in productivity on a per season basis, yet his adjusted line is "only":
              .309/.439/.673

              Here's the all time leaders in slugging:
              Ruth .673
              Williams .628
              Hornsby .597
              Gehrig .584
              Dimaggio .582

              Schell projects Dimaggio in a neutral park as hitting 429 home runs in a relatively very short career. And that just in a neutral park, not a good HR park....

              Man, I'd love to see how he did at Fenway over the course of his career!!

              Comment


              • Just a few items, game accounts from Joe's 1939 season, late in that season. He was injured that year played 120 games 462 at bats but late in the year he got hot with the bat.
                All in the 1939 season.

                A-- August 28- Big game 2 homers- 8 RBIs.
                B-- August 31-Some articles from the N.Y.Times
                C-- September 1- Hit streak 17 games 1 single 2 triples 6 RBIs.
                Attached Files

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                • Originally posted by csh19792001 View Post
                  Man, I'd love to see how he did at Fenway over the course of his career!!
                  There's the old adage, according to David Halberstam. One fan observed that if Williams had that short Rightfield to shoot for, he'd hit 60 home runs. Another fan shot back and said that if DiMaggio had the Green Monster, he'd shoot past the mark too.

                  Williams hit .309 with 30 homers and 94 RBI and 89 runs in Yankee Stadium in 475 AB's, though it's said he walked significantly more there than any other ballpark. In Fenway versus the Yankees, he hit .375 with 32 homers and 135 RBI's in 560 AB's, and scored 135 runs. Like I said, DiMaggio slugged over .600 versus the Red Sox (not home/road, but overall) in his career, so it's safe to say he hit a bit higher than the .600 SLG. at Fenway.

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                  • From the times. suprised me, he was hitting .405 this late in the season .405 on September 10 1939, ended up at .381.

                    Second article his hit streak ends at 18 games September 3, 1939. That was a double header and his streak ended in the first game. First game injured early left game with only one at bat. Second game 3 singles and one home run.

                    Going though the N.Y Times archives I found over the years a number of streaks he had going. One season a 22 game streak and another in one season two 12 game streaks breaking off for a few games and then a 15 game streak. I would guess partly from his not taking many walks and low number of strikeout, lots of contact when he did swing.
                    Attached Files

                    Comment


                    • Originally posted by DiMag4Life View Post
                      There's the old adage, according to David Halberstam. One fan observed that if Williams had that short Rightfield to shoot for, he'd hit 60 home runs. Another fan shot back and said that if DiMaggio had the Green Monster, he'd shoot past the mark too.

                      Williams hit .309 with 30 homers and 94 RBI and 89 runs in Yankee Stadium in 475 AB's, though it's said he walked significantly more there than any other ballpark. In Fenway versus the Yankees, he hit .375 with 32 homers and 135 RBI's in 560 AB's, and scored 135 runs. Like I said, DiMaggio slugged over .600 versus the Red Sox (not home/road, but overall) in his career, so it's safe to say he hit a bit higher than the .600 SLG. at Fenway.
                      Thats a possibility but we will never know. The right field line great for LH power hitters but I wonder if playing at NY would have shaved some points off of Ted's career batting average. Not to take anything away from Ted but Fenway is more of a hitters park than Yankee Stadium, who wouldn't want Ted on their team. Easier to pick up the ball leaving the pitchers hand at Fenway, better back drop at Fenway. Yankee Stadium for years had spectators in the center field bleachers. Foxx hated day games at Yankee Stadium hard to pick up the ball when spectators wearing light colored clothes in the CF bleachers. Also Fenway for years had the smallest foul territory, more chance of fouls dropping into the seats instead of into a fielders mitt.

                      Ted was not to crazy about playing at the big park, his words.
                      Attached Files

                      Comment


                      • Originally posted by SHOELESSJOE3 View Post
                        Thats a possibility but we will never know. The right field line great for LH power hitters but I wonder if playing at NY would have shaved some points off of Ted's career batting average. Not to take anything away from Ted but Fenway is more of a hitters park than Yankee Stadium, who wouldn't want Ted on their team. Easier to pick up the ball leaving the pitchers hand at Fenway, better back drop at Fenway. Yankee Stadium for years had spectators in the center field bleachers. Foxx hated day games at Yankee Stadium hard to pick up the ball when spectators wearing light colored clothes in the CF bleachers. Also Fenway for years had the smallest foul territory, more chance of fouls dropping into the seats instead of into a fielders mitt.

                        Ted was not to crazy about playing at the big park, his words.
                        Now Ted at Fenway. I think overall home runs and batting average combined, Ted was of more value to his team playing at fenway.
                        Attached Files

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                        • Wow Joe, you're really on tonight, keep up the outstanding work.

                          Thanks for coming through for me, especially with the articles covering DiMaggio's hot streak in '39. Very much appreciated.
                          Last edited by DiMag4Life; 02-25-2008, 09:35 PM.

                          Comment


                          • Originally posted by SHOELESSJOE3 View Post
                            From the times. suprised me, he was hitting .405 this late in the season .405 on September 10 1939, ended up at .381.
                            It doesn't surprise me.

                            This is excerpted from Fay Vincent's book.

                            "May I ask you a fan's questions?"

                            "You are the commissioner of baseball. You can ask me anything you want, Mr. Commissioner. I'll answer."

                            I warmed him up with some innocent questions. But then:

                            "How come you never hit .400?" I asked.

                            "Now that is a question almost nobody asks me," he said.

                            "They're afraid. I know you won't yell at me."

                            "It's a good question," DiMaggio said. This was a pleasing thing, to be able to ask DiMaggio — the great DiMaggio, as Ernest Hemingway called him in The Old Man and the Sea — a good question. "In 1939, I was going to hit .400. Right around the first of September, we clinched the pennant. We always clinched around the first of September. Right about then, I was hitting .408.

                            "I was going to hit over .400 that year. Then I got an eye infection. Couldn't see out of the infected eye. Our manager was Joe McCarthy. Every day, McCarthy puts me in the lineup. Commissioner, that guy made out a lineup card in April and he never changed it. Every day I'd go to the ballpark, every day my eye is getting worse and worse, and every day I'm in the lineup. I couldn't hit. My average starts falling. Finally, the eye gets so bad they have to give me an injection in the eye. And McCarthy still has me in the lineup. I wouldn't say anything to him. Now I did not have a bad year, Commissioner. I batted .381. But with my eye almost closed I had to open my stance. The infection was in my left eye, the lead eye. So I had to swing my left foot around to try to see the ball, but I couldn't. I had trouble and my average fell. That was my year to bat .400 and I didn't do it."
                            My little interview was going all right, so I asked the follow-up question: "Joe, did McCarthy ever tell you why he kept you in the lineup every day with the eye infection?"

                            "Yes, one time," Joe said. "We were in Buffalo, speaking together. He says, 'Joe, did you ever wonder why the hell I kept you in the lineup that year, when you had the bad eye?'

                            "I said, 'Yes, I did.'

                            "He says, 'Because I didn't want you to be a cheese champion.'"

                            "Cheese champion?" I asked. "What does that mean?"

                            "I don't know, Commissioner," Joe said. "I never asked."

                            Comment


                            • Originally posted by csh19792001 View Post
                              It doesn't surprise me.

                              This is excerpted from Fay Vincent's book.

                              "May I ask you a fan's questions?"

                              "You are the commissioner of baseball. You can ask me anything you want, Mr. Commissioner. I'll answer."

                              I warmed him up with some innocent questions. But then:

                              "How come you never hit .400?" I asked.

                              "Now that is a question almost nobody asks me," he said.

                              Looking at some of his swings, the wide stance but he hardly strides into the ball. It's a quick short step with the front foot. I would imagine with his stride being so wide that he could take only a short step with the front foot, but its a quick step.

                              "They're afraid. I know you won't yell at me."

                              "It's a good question," DiMaggio said. This was a pleasing thing, to be able to ask DiMaggio — the great DiMaggio, as Ernest Hemingway called him in The Old Man and the Sea — a good question. "In 1939, I was going to hit .400. Right around the first of September, we clinched the pennant. We always clinched around the first of September. Right about then, I was hitting .408.

                              "I was going to hit over .400 that year. Then I got an eye infection. Couldn't see out of the infected eye. Our manager was Joe McCarthy. Every day, McCarthy puts me in the lineup. Commissioner, that guy made out a lineup card in April and he never changed it. Every day I'd go to the ballpark, every day my eye is getting worse and worse, and every day I'm in the lineup. I couldn't hit. My average starts falling. Finally, the eye gets so bad they have to give me an injection in the eye. And McCarthy still has me in the lineup. I wouldn't say anything to him. Now I did not have a bad year, Commissioner. I batted .381. But with my eye almost closed I had to open my stance. The infection was in my left eye, the lead eye. So I had to swing my left foot around to try to see the ball, but I couldn't. I had trouble and my average fell. That was my year to bat .400 and I didn't do it."
                              My little interview was going all right, so I asked the follow-up question: "Joe, did McCarthy ever tell you why he kept you in the lineup every day with the eye infection?"

                              "Yes, one time," Joe said. "We were in Buffalo, speaking together. He says, 'Joe, did you ever wonder why the hell I kept you in the lineup that year, when you had the bad eye?'

                              "I said, 'Yes, I did.'

                              "He says, 'Because I didn't want you to be a cheese champion.'"

                              "Cheese champion?" I asked. "What does that mean?"

                              "I don't know, Commissioner," Joe said. "I never asked."
                              I guess that explains the drop from that .400+ to .381. No way to tell if Joe would have ended up at .400 if there was no eye infection but the odds would have been better.

                              He was certainly on fire that season. I took a glance at some game write ups in the N.Y.Time archives and he was hitting consistently and hitting hard. In one game he homered to deep LCF at home and it was noted the only other ball hit to that point was hit by Hank Greenberg.
                              Last edited by SHOELESSJOE3; 02-26-2008, 09:07 AM.

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                              • Dimaggio Pictures

                                Does anyone have any rare dimaggio pictures, especially ones with the seals?

                                thanks!

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