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  • Top 10 Coaches:

    We've done many lists, but so far, none on coaches. Anyone have any ideas of your Top 10 coaches?

  • #2
    Originally posted by [email protected] View Post
    We've done many lists, but so far, none on coaches. Anyone have any ideas of your Top 10 coaches?
    You're definitely talking coaches, not managers?
    Mythical SF Chronicle scouting report: "That Jeff runs like a deer. Unfortunately, he also hits AND throws like one." I am Venus DeMilo - NO ARM! I can play like a big leaguer, I can field like Luzinski, run like Lombardi. The secret to managing is keeping the ones who hate you away from the undecided ones. I am a triumph of quantity over quality. I'm almost useful, every village needs an idiot.
    Good traders: MadHatter(2), BoofBonser26, StormSurge

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    • #3
      Originally posted by RuthMayBond View Post
      You're definitely talking coaches, not managers?
      We already did managers.

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      • #4
        Without a doubt, two of the best hitting coaches in recent years were both light-hitting catchers! Charlie Lau and Walt Hriniak. Lau was the hitting guru that George Brett praised so highly as having helped him become the great hitter he was, as well as helping other Royals hitters. Hriniak developed the swing that so many major leaguers use today. Frank Thomas has lavished praise on him for making him a complete hitter. I see it all the time now. A right-handed hitter will keep his head low as he makes contact with the ball and releases his left hand as the bat swings out wide behind his body.
        Always go to other people's funerals, otherwise they won't come to yours. - Yogi Berra

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        • #5
          Rube Walker was very instrumental in the development of Tom Seaver, Jerry Koosman, and Nolan Ryan. At one time or another, I have heard or read all of them credit Walker with his "pitching with your legs" approach. This may have not been revolutionary, but I think it deserves mention.
          http://soundbounder.blogspot.com/

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          • #6
            What about Paul Richards, who so successfully coached a ton of early 1960's Orioles pitchers?
            "They put me in the Hall of Fame? They must really be scraping the bottom of the barrel!"
            -Eppa Rixey, upon learning of his induction to the Baseball Hall of Fame.

            Motafy (MO-ta-fy) vt. -fied, -fying 1. For a pitcher to melt down in a big game situation; to become like Guillermo Mota. 2. The transformation of a good pitcher into one of Guillermo Mota's caliber.

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            • #7
              The Cro, Frankie Crosetti, long time Yankee player and later coach of the team. Tutored many of the Yankee stars through the years.

              Yankees Fan Since 1957

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              • #8
                What about the young player/managers who were put in that knew nothing about pitching? Guys like Bill McKechnie (for Boudreau) had to pull up the slack and were in essense co-managers.

                BTW who was Cronin's pitching coaches - he sure needed them?

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by yanks0714 View Post
                  The Cro, Frankie Crosetti, long time Yankee player and later coach of the team. Tutored many of the Yankee stars through the years.
                  The Cro had a prominent role as a coach in Jim Bouton's 'Ball Four'. Funny stuff!
                  Always go to other people's funerals, otherwise they won't come to yours. - Yogi Berra

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                  • #10
                    I will chime in with my 2 cents at some point, but I first wanted to give others the chance to get some commentary down.

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                    • #11
                      Johnny Sain as a pitching coach.
                      “There can be no higher law in journalism than to tell the truth and to shame the devil.” Walter Lippmann

                      "Fill in any figure you want for that boy (Mantle). Whatever the figure, it's a deal." - Branch Rickey

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                      • #12
                        Don Zimmer, Willie Randolph, Mel Stottlemyre, Bill Dickey, Elston Howard were all good, from a Yankees point of view.
                        MySpace Codes

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                        • #13
                          Certainly one of the most flamboyant, and thus most famous, was Hughie "Ee-yah" Jennings. He was manager/third base coach for Detroit for years and was known for his eccentric behavior in the coach's box at third base. Extremely animated, he would shout his famous "EE-YAH!!" and do a 'war dance' while coaching third. He would jump, whirl, gyrate and generally become a distraction to the opposing pitchers (he once brought a tin whistle to a game and began blowing it throughout. The opposing team complained about the noise and Jennings was ordered to stop, but he defied the order and continued blowing his whistle. This earned him a 10-day suspension from the league). He would pluck grass - how he plucked at it signaled which play was on. "EE-YAH!" was his war whoop that would get the fans fired up and urge his team to score some runs. Connie Mack humbly called Jennings one of the top three managers in baseball history, along with McGraw and McCarthy.

                          I'd say Jennings may have been one of the best (at least most colorful) coaches in the game's history.
                          Always go to other people's funerals, otherwise they won't come to yours. - Yogi Berra

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