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  • Worst Trades

    The Baseball Hall of Shame books had chapters devoted to worst trades. I don't have the books with me now but here are some that I remember.

    1990: Red Sox trade minor leaguer Jeff Bagwell to Astros for pitcher Larry Andersen, who pitches 22 innings for the Sox and leaves as a free agent.

    1982: Phillies trade rookie Ryne Sandberg and veteran Larry Bowa to Cubs for Ivan DeJesus. Sandberg goes to Hall of Fame, DeJesus plays 3 years for Phils with OPS+ of 74, 84, and 77.

    1964: Cubs trade 25-year-old Lou Brock and two other players to Cardinals for Ernie Broglio, Bobby Shantz, and Doug Clemens. Broglio pitches 2 1/2 years for the Cubs and wins a total of 7 games, Shantz pitches 11 innings and then gets sold (!), Clemens hits .221 the following year and gets traded again.

    1949: A's trade 21-year-old Nellie Fox to White Sox for Joe Tipton, who puts up OPS+ of 90, 92, and 95 before being waived.

    1916: Red Sox trade Tris Speaker to Indians for Sam Jones, Fred Thomas, and cash. And it wasn't even the worst deal the Red Sox made in that decade.

    Any others? What's the worst trade of the past 10 years? I can't think of any because superstars usually change teams via free agency instead of trades.

  • #2
    It had to be when the soxs traded away Ruth.

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    • #3
      Here's another good one I just found.

      1992: Cubs trade former MVP George Bell to White Sox for Sammy Sosa and one other player. Bell has two awful seasons for the White Sox, then retires.

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      • #4
        Someone always has to mention this trade in a thread like this: Pedro Martinez for Delino DeShields.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by BoSox Rule
          Someone always has to mention this trade in a thread like this: Pedro Martinez for Delino DeShields.
          Yeah... and then Pedro Martinez for Tony Armas and Carl Pavano.

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          • #6
            Amos Rusie for Christy Mathewson. Rusie won exactly zero games and lost one for Cincinnati; Mathewson won 372 for New York.

            Goslin for Crowder and Manush when they were at their peak and well after his was a big bad one.

            Frank Robinson for Milt Pappas. Robinson responded with a triple crown; Pappas with a 4.29 ERA.
            "Here's a crazy thought I've always had: if they cut three fingers off each hand, I'd really be a great hitter because then I could level off better." Paul Waner (lifetime .333 hitter, 3,152 lifetime hits.

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            • #7
              One more bad one from the 60's, Giants send Orlando Cepeda to the Cards for pitcher Ray Sadecki. The Baby Bull proceeds to win the MVP and help the Cards to a WS title, Sadecki has a few woeful years for the Giants...:grouchy

              KH14
              “Well, I like to say I’m completely focused, right? I mean, the game’s on the line. It’s not like I’m thinking about what does barbecue Pop Chips and Cholula taste like. Because I already know that answer — it tastes friggin’ awesome!"--Brian Wilson

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              • #8
                Originally posted by kckid2599
                It had to be when the soxs traded away Ruth.
                I think of it more as a sell than a trade. There were gonna be other players involved, but nobody wanted to insult anyone's intelligence by pretending the deal was about anything but money.

                Worst non-trades, or non-signings goes to the Boston franchise hands down. They could have got so many good ones along the way, but always found the banana peel.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Sultan_1895-1948
                  Worst non-trades, or non-signings goes to the Boston franchise hands down. They could have got so many good ones along the way, but always found the banana peel.
                  They're 0-3 so far in this thread.

                  Originally posted by BuzzAldrin
                  Goslin for Crowder and Manush when they were at their peak and well after his was a big bad one.
                  That wasn't a very good trade, but it wasn't quite as bad as the others listed. Goslin played pretty well for the Browns. Of course they proceeded to trade him right back to Washington two years later for practically nothing, and Goslin, Manush, and Crowder led Washington to the pennant.

                  Originally posted by KHenry14
                  One more bad one from the 60's, Giants send Orlando Cepeda to the Cards for pitcher Ray Sadecki. The Baby Bull proceeds to win the MVP and help the Cards to a WS title, Sadecki has a few woeful years for the Giants...
                  I thought the Giants traded Cepeda for peanuts because they already had McCovey. That trade didn't hurt them too badly, I don't think. Still, they could've done a little better.

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                  • #10
                    Steve Carlton for Rick Wise. The Cardinals would have made several World Series in the 1970's if they didn't trade away Carlton.
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                    • #11
                      Aramis Ramirez and Kenny Lofton for Bobby Hill, Jose Hernandez, and Matt Bruback.

                      Granted this was a pay cut trade but the Cubs still made out like bandits.

                      Another one that good have been really bad but because of some things turned out to just miss the cut is the Scott Rolen trade.

                      It ends up basically being a Scott Rolen for Placido Polanco trade and Polanco turned into pretty nice player while Scott has had some trouble staying healthy. If Scott stays healthy and Polanco doesn't start hitting like he did this would have been a really bad trade instead it is only slightly bad.
                      Attached Files
                      Last edited by Ubiquitous; 08-20-2009, 07:48 AM.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by abacab
                        I thought the Giants traded Cepeda for peanuts because they already had McCovey. That trade didn't hurt them too badly, I don't think. Still, they could've done a little better.
                        It was partly because McCovey was there, but mostly because they needed a good lefty starter. They should have tried to get Carlton instead of Sadecki

                        KH14
                        “Well, I like to say I’m completely focused, right? I mean, the game’s on the line. It’s not like I’m thinking about what does barbecue Pop Chips and Cholula taste like. Because I already know that answer — it tastes friggin’ awesome!"--Brian Wilson

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          --It was also because Cepeda was already having serious knee problems. He did win the 67 MVP, but his best years were actually behind him.

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                          • #14
                            Here's some good ones from the distant past (although Rusie for Mathewson is still the worst all-time)


                            George Davis for Buck Ewing.

                            Davis was 21 and just starting his Hall of Fame career. He responded with nine straight .300 seasons for the Giants.

                            Ewing was 33 and on the way down- he had one good year withe Cleveland (the ones who traded away davis), then went to Cincinnati and out of the big leagues.


                            Hugh Nicol for Jack Boyle.

                            Nicol only hit .215, BUT he did steal the all-time record 138 bases (let's not get started about the rules; it's still damn impressive) and score 122 runs in 125 games (he walked 86 times as well).

                            Boyle hit .189


                            Gid Gardner for Paul Hines.

                            This never made sense- Gardner had just hit .175 for Indianapolis, while former triple crown winner Hines (an overlooked HOFer if there ever was one) had just hit .312 and .308 and finished near the top of the league in several categories with Washington.

                            Hines hit .281 and .305 with the Hoosiers, Gardner appeared in 2 games with Wahington, one with Philly, and was out of baseball.

                            There was something seriously shady about that deal.


                            Hughie Jennings (and Harry Taylor) went to Baltimore for Tim O'Rourke.

                            The same year, Baltimore got Wille Keeler and Dan Brouthers from Brooklyn for Billy Shindle and George Treadway. That had to hurt.


                            Billy Hamilton for Billy Nash is a classic. Nash hit .247, .258, .243 with Philly (only the second year came in more than 100 games) after the trade. Billy continued his hitting barrage (he'd hit .404 and .389 the two seasons before the trade with the Phils) by posting .365, .343, and .369 his first three years in Boston.

                            And, of course, the biggest, shadiest trade of them all- Jack Chesbro, a handful of cash, and three also-rans from Pittsburgh to Louisville for Honus Wagner, Fred Clarke, Deacon Phillippe, Rube Waddell, Tommy Leach, Chief Zimmer, and six other players. A nice even handed trade with no hint of syndicalism. Funny, how Chesbro ended up back on Pittsburgh next spring, isn't it?
                            "Here's a crazy thought I've always had: if they cut three fingers off each hand, I'd really be a great hitter because then I could level off better." Paul Waner (lifetime .333 hitter, 3,152 lifetime hits.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Buzzaldrin
                              Frank Robinson for Milt Pappas. Robinson responded with a triple crown; Pappas with a 4.29 ERA.

                              But Pappas brought us the Gyro sandwich! I remember reading an iten way back in the late 70s or early 80s about Milt Pappas. In the story, Pappas gushed about this newfangled sandwich he was trying to push: a Gyro sandwich.

                              Plus, I found a 1960s baseball card of him once and thought because it was so old, it must be worth something! I held onto that card for years.
                              "Hey Mr. McGraw! Can I pitch to-day?"

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