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  • #16
    Perhaps the worst trade ever actually involved two HOFers.

    In 1900, the Cincinnati Reds traded a young pitching prospect out of Bucknell named Christy Mathewson to the New York Giants for their star pitcher, Amos Rusie.

    Despite that Rusie hadn't pitched for a year, the Reds thought they were making out in the deal, getting a 29 year old pitcher who just three year's ago was the league's best. They were wrong, Rusie's arm, after tremendously tough workloads through the entire 1890s decade, was completely shot. He could barely pitch at all. He pitched 22 innings for the Reds, with an 8.59 ERA.

    Mathewson, as wel all know, went on to tremendous career as one of the best pitchers of all time. So, let's "score" this trade and look at what each side got:

    Cincinnati Reds, Amos Rusie
    Code:
    Year Ag Tm  Lg  W   L   G   GS  CG SHO  GF SV   IP     H    R   ER   HR  BB   SO  HBP  WP  BFP  IBB  BK  ERA *lgERA *ERA+ WHIP
    1901 30 CIN NL   0   1   3   2   2   0   0  0   22.0   43   25   21   1    3    6   0   2   107       0  8.59  3.19   37 2.091
    New York Giants, Christy Mathewson
    Code:
    W   L   G   GS  CG SHO  GF SV   IP     H    R   ER   HR  BB   SO  HBP  WP  BFP  IBB  BK  ERA *lgERA *ERA+ WHIP
    373 188 635 551 434  79  74 28 4780.7 4218 1616 1133  91  844 2502  59 114 19136       6  2.13  2.88  135 1.059
    I don't think there's ever been a more lopsided trade than that.

    Comment


    • #17
      Originally posted by abacab
      They're 0-3 so far in this thread.
      Look again. They are 1-1. Make that 2-1 now:

      Heathcliff Slocumb to Seatle for Derek Lowe and Jason Varitek.
      Best posts ever:
      Originally posted by nymdan
      Too... much... math... head... hurts...
      Originally posted by RuthMayBond
      I understand, I lost all my marbles years ago

      Comment


      • #18
        Originally posted by 538280
        Perhaps the worst trade ever actually involved two HOFers.

        In 1900, the Cincinnati Reds traded a young pitching prospect out of Bucknell named Christy Mathewson to the New York Giants for their star pitcher, Amos Rusie.

        Despite that Rusie hadn't pitched for a year, the Reds thought they were making out in the deal, getting a 29 year old pitcher who just three year's ago was the league's best. They were wrong, Rusie's arm, after tremendously tough workloads through the entire 1890s decade, was completely shot. He could barely pitch at all. He pitched 22 innings for the Reds, with an 8.59 ERA.

        I don't think there's ever been a more lopsided trade than that.
        Did you read the post just before yours? the Reds did NOT think they were making out on the deal. Well, maybe the team and the fans did, but owner John Brush didn't; he knew the score and he knew Rusie's dead arm, and he made the deal with New York and Norfolk fully aware.
        "Here's a crazy thought I've always had: if they cut three fingers off each hand, I'd really be a great hitter because then I could level off better." Paul Waner (lifetime .333 hitter, 3,152 lifetime hits.

        Comment


        • #19
          Originally posted by efin98
          Look again. They are 1-1. Make that 2-1 now:

          Heathcliff Slocumb to Seatle for Derek Lowe and Jason Varitek.
          Okay, I counted again, they're 2-3 on this thread. Or 2-2 if you don't count Ruth, since it was technically a "sale" not a "trade".

          Comment


          • #20
            Originally posted by abacab
            Okay, I counted again, they're 2-3 on this thread. Or 2-2 if you don't count Ruth, since it was technically a "sale" not a "trade".
            Speaker is the same as Ruth, a sale and not a trade.

            2-1 still, with 2 sales.
            Best posts ever:
            Originally posted by nymdan
            Too... much... math... head... hurts...
            Originally posted by RuthMayBond
            I understand, I lost all my marbles years ago

            Comment


            • #21
              Originally posted by efin98
              Speaker is the same as Ruth, a sale and not a trade.

              2-1 still, with 2 sales.
              Huh? They got two players for Speaker. But whatever. Red Sox are 2-1 on trades, and they've made the two worst sales in the history of organized baseball. Happy now?

              Comment


              • #22
                Originally posted by abacab
                Huh? They got two players for Speaker. But whatever. Red Sox are 2-1 on trades, and they've made the two worst sales in the history of organized baseball. Happy now?
                It's nothing like the dismantling of the A's twice, but it's anothe Boston witch hunt going on here so it doesn't matter how bad others were as long as Ruth and Speaker can be jabbed in
                Best posts ever:
                Originally posted by nymdan
                Too... much... math... head... hurts...
                Originally posted by RuthMayBond
                I understand, I lost all my marbles years ago

                Comment


                • #23
                  The Mets in their infinite wisdom trading Nolan Ryan for Jim Fregosi and Amos Otis for Joe Foy. Thank God I am a Yankee fan.

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    Originally posted by efin98
                    It's nothing like the dismantling of the A's twice, but it's anothe Boston witch hunt going on here so it doesn't matter how bad others were as long as Ruth and Speaker can be jabbed in
                    Yes, that's right, you've figured me out. The real reason I started this thread was to bash Boston. Nothing gets by you.

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      Mark McGwire for T.J. Mathews, Eric Ludwick and Blake Stein sticks out in my mind.

                      As does Jamie Moyer for Darren Bragg. Moyer had several great seasons after being traded... What ever happened to Bragg?

                      And how about Lou Brock for Ernie Broglio back in the 60's. Are you kidding me?!?!
                      WAR? Prove it!

                      Trusted Traders: ttmman21, Dalkowski110, BoofBonser26, Kearns643, HudsonHarden, Extra Innings, MadHatter, Mike D., J.P., SShifflett

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        Originally posted by abacab
                        I thought the Giants traded Cepeda for peanuts because they already had McCovey. That trade didn't hurt them too badly, I don't think. Still, they could've done a little better.
                        Cha Cha was injured for most of the 1965 season and McCovey finally became a fixture at 1st base after a couple of seasons in the outfield. Neither Cepeda or McCovey were very good outfielders, while both were excellent first sackers.

                        Ray Sadecki had a terrible year in 1965 after his 20 win season in 1964. He was very young, and I guess the Giants figured he had some good years left.
                        After another injury plagued season in 1966, mostly with the Giants, Sadecki actually didn't pitch badly in 1967 - he went 12-6 in 24 starts, 2.78 ERA, 10 CG's and a couple of shutouts. And he actually pitched very well in 1968, but was the regular victim of hard luck. He went 12-18, but had a 2.91 ERA, six shutouts and 206 strikeouts. After that, though, his arm troubles began again.

                        Cepeda gave the Cards an excellent season in 1966, an MVP season in 1967, then slumped badly during the 1968, "year of the pitcher." He was shipped to the Braves for Joe Torre the following season.

                        An ironic twist - in 1974, Ray Sadecki returned to the Cardinals. He was traded from the Mets, along with a minor leaguer for Joe Torre.

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          [QUOTE=efin98Look at the Jeff Bagwell trade. They were smart then in trading away Jeff Bagwell. He was third on the depth chart at third base behind Scott Cooper(future 2 time All Star) and Wade Boggs(Hall of Famer).[/QUOTE]Please don't tell me you think Scott "We have to pick SOMEONE from the BoSox" Cooper was better than Bagwell
                          Mythical SF Chronicle scouting report: "That Jeff runs like a deer. Unfortunately, he also hits AND throws like one." I am Venus DeMilo - NO ARM! I can play like a big leaguer, I can field like Luzinski, run like Lombardi. The secret to managing is keeping the ones who hate you away from the undecided ones. I am a triumph of quantity over quality. I'm almost useful, every village needs an idiot.
                          Good traders: MadHatter(2), BoofBonser26, StormSurge

                          Comment


                          • #28
                            Heres one:

                            1930-Boston Red Sox trade P Red Ruffing to the Yankees for CF Cedric Durst and $50,000

                            Durst finished out that 1930 season with the red sox, and then he retired, Ruffing on the other hand went to 7 world series with the Yankees, winning 6 of them, and posting a 7-2 record in 10 games

                            Comment


                            • #29
                              I know I've mentioned this trade before in a thread like this, but hey, it deserves being mentioned again:

                              On August 28, 1983, the Braves obtained Len Barker from the Cleveland Indians for three players to be named later and $150,000. They ended up being Rick Behenna (September 2) and Brett Butler and Brook Jacoby (October 21). In the Braves' defense, at the time, they were a half-game ahead of Los Angeles at the top of the NL West Division, and they thought that Barker would help seperate them from the Dodgers.

                              When they decided to send Behenna, the Braves were 2 1/2 games behind the Dodgers. The Braves finished three games behind the Dodgers and after the season sent Butler and Jacoby to Cleveland.

                              Hindsight has made this a bad trade, but the Braves had Brad Komminsk ready to go, and he was still regarded as a top prospect, so they had to get rid of Butler to make room. I don't agree with the trading of Jacoby though. THey should have kept him as insurance since Bob Horner was never the most healthy player in history.
                              Last edited by SamtheBravesFan; 03-06-2006, 06:27 AM.
                              46 wins to match last year's total

                              Comment


                              • #30
                                Originally posted by baseballPAP
                                And, I can't believe no one has thrown out Doyle Alexander for John Smoltz yet.....
                                I saw that one, but I noticed that Alexander went 9-0 for the Tigers in '87. The Tigers ended up winning the division by two games, so Alexander was an essential pickup. On the other hand, he pitched two more lackluster years and then retired, and we all know what Smoltz has done. It's a tough call - maybe it's worth trading a can't-miss prospect if it's going to help you make the playoffs, because who knows when it'll happen again. The Tigers haven't made the postseason since.

                                Comment

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