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Worst Trades

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  • #31
    Here's a good one from 1992: Houston trades Curt Schilling to the Phillies for Jason Grimsley, who plays exactly zero games for the Astros.

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    • #32
      I'm surprised nobody has mentioned the Kekich-Peterson swap.

      That affair overshadowed the AL's introduction of the DH as baseball's biggest story during 1973's spring training.

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      • #33
        Originally posted by AG2004
        I'm surprised nobody has mentioned the Kekich-Peterson swap.

        That affair overshadowed the AL's introduction of the DH as baseball's biggest story during 1973's spring training.
        And that was indeed, a one-sided trade. I think Fritz is still with the former Mrs. Kekich. Mike didn't fare too well with the ex Mrs. Peterson.

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        • #34
          In 1948, the Washington Senators traded Early Wynn and Mickey Vernon to the Cleveland Indians for Ed Klieman, Joe Haynes, and Eddie Robinson.

          Then in 1950, about 1.5 years later, Cleveland traded Mickey Vernon back to Washington for Dick Weik, a lifetime .214 pitcher.

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          • #35
            The A's got Eckersley (plus a failed prospect) for 3 minor leaguers.

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            • #36
              Didn't the Mets trade Harry Chiti to the Indians for a player to be named later, only to receive Chiti back as that player? Perhaps not the "worst" trade ever, but certainly one of the weirdest.
              I will not assimilate into the Angelos Collective. Resistance is not futile.

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              • #37
                Johnny Mize for Ken O'Dea, Bill Lohrman, Johnny McCarthy, and $50000 cash.
                But I guess if you've got a Musial coming up, what's a Johnny Mize?

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                • #38
                  In late 1987, the Tigers are making a play-off run and they trade then-prospect John Smoltz to the Braves for Doyle Alexander.

                  They make the playoffs but are eliminated quickly.

                  Alexander wins 29 games over 2 plus seasons for the Tigs, then retires.
                  We all know the stellar career Smoltz has had. How's that for bad trade?


                  The other notable one I can think of is a bad trade for the Senators.
                  After the 1970 season they traded Aurelio Rodriguez, Eddie Brinkman, Jim Hannan to the Tigs for a rapidly declining Denny McLain. I think there may have been another couple minor players I can't recall right off.

                  Anyway, Brinkman and Rodriguez improved the Tigers infield for a time and McLain was only with Washington one year and out of baseball 2 yrs later.
                  Bad deal for the Senators.
                  1968 and 1984, the greatest ever.

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                  • #39
                    Originally posted by Tigerfan1974
                    In late 1987, the Tigers are making a play-off run and they trade then-prospect John Smoltz to the Braves for Doyle Alexander.

                    They make the playoffs but are eliminated quickly.

                    Alexander wins 29 games over 2 plus seasons for the Tigs, then retires.
                    We all know the stellar career Smoltz has had. How's that for bad trade?
                    We've discussed this one already- I don't think it was a bad trade at all. Alexander went 9-0 in 11 games down the stretch for the Tigers, with three shutouts and a 278 ERA plus. The Tigers won the division by two, which they would NOT have done without Alexander.

                    Detroit has not won their division since then. Alexander, in only 11 starts, got a first place MVP vote- how many starters in history can say that?
                    "Here's a crazy thought I've always had: if they cut three fingers off each hand, I'd really be a great hitter because then I could level off better." Paul Waner (lifetime .333 hitter, 3,152 lifetime hits.

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                    • #40
                      In 1910, Philadelphia traded a centerfielder who hit roughly .150 the previous 2 seasons to Cleveland for another outfielder who could at least bat his weight. Of course, the centerfielder was Joe Jackson.

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                      • #41
                        Originally posted by Buzzaldrin
                        Detroit has not won their division since then.
                        My point exactly. If they hadn't been so impatient, Smoltz could have helped them the next year and for years to come.
                        In the long run, it was a bad trade. One of those 'must win now' attitudes that has cost them ever since.
                        Are the Tigers under the curse of Smoltz?
                        1968 and 1984, the greatest ever.

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                        • #42
                          I like the 1894 trade of Willie Keeler and the almost-but-not-quite-done Dan Brouthers for some Billy Shindle and George Treadway no-names.

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                          • #43
                            The Jeff Bagwell trade always fascinates me because to me its almost like a "perfect storm". The Red Sox it seems were fated to trade him away. Bagwell was traded away in 1990, looking at the Red Sox in 1990 its easy to see why they traded him. What are the possible positions that Bagwell could have played? Thirdbase, Firstbase, Leftfield, Rightfield. Lets look at them one by one:

                            Thirdbase: Bagwells position in the minors. Who is ahead of him? Wade Boggs who would play 2 more seasons for the Red SOx and who was still a quality player. If Boggs doesn't hit poorly in 1992 he probably stays with the Red Sox. Then behind him is Scott Cooper who was drafted several years earlier then Bagwell. Now personally I have no idea why the Red Sox rated Bagwell higher then Cooper. I don't even know if they did or if he was rated higher then Cooper which is why the Astro's wanted him. Cooper was showing he couldn't hit a lick in the minors while Bagwell in short minor league career was showing he could hit. So lets say the Red Sox figured they would have Boggs at third for several years to come, they probably figured he was good for at least 4 or 5 more years. So that means Bagwell will have to move to another position

                            Firstbase: At first base they got their first round draft pick Mo Vaughn coming up, and unless he fails then Bagwell is effectively blocked from playing first base for many years. So now we must look to the outfield.

                            Left Field: In 1990 the Left fielder is Mike Greenwell fresh off of two straight all-star nods. So it would appear that the Red Sox would not be replacing a LF'er with Bags.

                            Right Field: RF is being manned by young Ellis Burks who was looking every bit like he was going to be there awhile. Heck he was even an all-star in 1990.

                            So what does that leave? Well it leaves the DH. So who would become the DH? Going to move Boggs to the DH, going to put a young untested prospect at DH?

                            To me it looks like a situation where the Red Sox thought they didn't have a spot for this guy. There team and players were doing too well and they didn't need to replace them with Bagwell. The trade for Anderson was stupid in that a) they didn't Anderson and B)wasn't even close to the value of Bagwell.

                            The Red Sox would have been better off holding on to Bagwell. they were not endanger of losing him to Rule V or minor league free agency, so they were not forced to do this. They could have traded him in the offseason or even just kept him in the minors for awhile to see how things shaped up. They didn't give Boggs a shot until he was 24 so it wasn't like it would have been unheard of for them to do it.

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                            • #44
                              I never realized that, in 1983, a pretty bad second-baseman was traded for 2 minor leaguers, one of them being John Franco.

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                              • #45
                                Look at Rickey.

                                Rickey was traded to the Yanks and in return they goy Stan Javier, Jay Howell, Jose Rijo, Eric Plunk, and Tim Birtsas. None of them really did anything for the A's though they would some of them would have long careers and even become all-stars they didn't do it for the A's. Except for Howell who had one good season, one decent season, and one horrid season with the A's. Made one-all star appearance with them but he was a reliever.

                                Meanwhile Rickey puts up numbers in New York that blows away anything any of those others guy ever did. If anything Rickey in 1987 might have been enough to push the A's into the playoffs that year. Of course Rickey has to cloud the issue with hamstring problems but who knows perhaps if he stays in Oakland he has a different staff, plays different games, different positions and never hurts his hamstring that year. Who knows.

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