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Top 10 greatest records in baseball?

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  • Herr28
    replied
    Originally posted by ipitch View Post
    It was probably Medwick. He is tied for the record for consecutive at-bats with a hit (10). So, for plate appearances, he might have reached base safely 12 straight times. Frank Ward holds the all-time NL record with 17, but that was 1893.
    Yep, found it while looking for something else (always works that way it seems). It was July 21, 1936, in a game against the Giants at the Polo Grounds - Joe Medwick goes 3 for 3 with 2 doubles and a single, to tie the National League record for hits in 10 consecutive at-bats. He had gone 7 for 7 in a doubleheader against the Braves at home in St. Louis during the previous 2 games on July 19, 1936.

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  • Herr28
    replied
    Originally posted by ipitch View Post
    It was probably Medwick. He is tied for the record for consecutive at-bats with a hit (10). So, for plate appearances, he might have 12. Frank Ward holds the all-time NL record with 17, but that was 1893.
    Thanks! Ah, gone are the buttons and belts love in the avatar. It was a nice run!

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  • ipitch
    replied
    Originally posted by Herr28 View Post
    Do you happen to know who set the NL record with reaching base in 12 consecutive plate appearances? I just ran across it in one of the Cardinals history books I was flipping through in the past couple days. It was either Enos Slaughter or Joe Medwick, but I can't remember which one.
    It was probably Medwick. He is tied for the record for consecutive at-bats with a hit (10). So, for plate appearances, he might have reached base safely 12 straight times. Frank Ward holds the all-time NL record with 17, but that was 1893.
    Last edited by ipitch; 12-28-2013, 01:16 PM.

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  • Herr28
    replied
    Originally posted by RuthMayBond View Post
    That's on base, not hits
    Do you happen to know who set the NL record with reaching base in 12 consecutive plate appearances? I just ran across it in one of the Cardinals history books I was flipping through in the past couple days. It was either Enos Slaughter or Joe Medwick, but I can't remember which one. I really don't think it was Stan Musial, that would have been too obvious and probably would have stuck out more in my mind. Slaughter and Medwick get largely forgotten, and I think it was one of them that did it. Darn, now I am conjuring up all kinds of names as possibilities like Pepper Martin and Johnny Mize too! I gotta dig in these books again, which is always a fun task for me!

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  • RuthMayBond
    replied
    Originally posted by George H Ruth View Post
    In your opinions what are the top 10 greatest baseball records. I'm not saying top 10 records that will never get beaten. I just want to know what you think is the top 10 records in Major League history?

    Here are mine in no order:


    Ted Williams gets a hit in 17 consecutive at bats
    That's on base, not hits

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  • RuthMayBond
    replied
    Originally posted by leagueleader View Post
    Ruth hitting 88% of his teams Hr's in 1919 Ruth 29 Rest of team 4
    George Hall was close ;-)

    <Ted Williams leading league in Slugging pct every year from 1941 to 1955 with asterick*. In some of those years he didn't have enough AB to qualify, still its remarkable.>

    1943-1945, 1952 and 1953 are a STRETCH :headbeat:

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  • stuarthouse
    replied
    Streaks are interesting and difficult to duplicate, but as far as "great" records are concerned they are irrelevant!
    Originally posted by George H Ruth View Post
    In your opinions what are the top 10 greatest baseball records. I'm not saying top 10 records that will never get beaten. I just want to know what you think is the top 10 records in Major League history?

    Here are mine in no order:

    Joe DiMaggio's hitting streak(56 games)
    Cal Ripken's iron man streak(2,632)
    Orel Hershiser's scoreless innings streak(59 innings)
    Hack Wilson's single-season RBI record (191)
    Bob Gibson's ERA in 1968(1.12)
    Cy Young's (511 wins)
    Rube Marquard's 19 wins in a row
    The 1916 Giants' 26-game winning streak
    Connie Mack's 50 years managing the same team
    Ted Williams gets a hit in 17 consecutive at bats

    It was very tough and I'm sure I miss some good ones, but those are the ones that I can think of right now. I might change my list later on.

    What about you guys?

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  • torez77
    replied
    Let's not forget those 19th century records like Duffy's .440, Hamilton's 192, and Keefe's 0.86 (still can't believe that's actually considered a record (105 IP)) Unbreakable by today's standards. How great they are is up for debate considering the era, but worth mentioning.

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  • Herr28
    replied
    Originally posted by leagueleader View Post
    Sam Rice had similar stats: From 1921-1929 he had 124 3B & 124 SO's & in 5 of those years had more triples than strikeouts.

    In his career he had 498 doubles & only 275 strikeouts. Playing in cavernous Griffith Stadium had a lot to do with that!
    Yeah, I thought that there were probably a lot of Deadball and earlier players than Stan to have done it. Especially in that era when starting players would go 600+ PAs and strike out less than 20 times! In fact, I'll look up the much maligned Lloyd Waner (a favorite punching bag around here), because he had the third best career AB per K (44.92) behind Wee Willie Keeler (63.17) and Joe Sewell (62.56) with a minimum of 3000 plate appearances.

    Lloyd Waner, more (or same) 3B than K in a season:

    1928 (22): 14 3B - 13 K, 719 PA
    1929 (23): 20 3B - 20 K, 726 PA
    1932 (26): 11 3B - 11 K, 599 PA
    1935 (29): 14 3B - 10 K, 562 PA
    1936 (30): _8 3B - _6 K, 444 PA
    1941 (35): _1 3B - _0 K, 234 PA

    That is 6 of his 18 seasons with a triple total greater than or equal to his strikeout total. One-third of his career. Of course that is a factor of the era he played in and the approach he took at the dish, but it is still pretty neat to me anyway. He had only one season where he had more than 10 Ks than 3Bs, that was his rookie year in 1927 (21 years old) when he had 6 3B and 23 K (683 PA). That was also his career high in K, and only in 1929 did he touch 20 in a season again. In 1939, at age 33, he had exactly 10 more K than 3B (13 to 3), and that was the only other time he was in double digits between the two in favor of Ks. Crazy, and not bad over an 18 year big league career.

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  • leagueleader
    replied
    Originally posted by Herr28 View Post
    I don't know if it qualifies as a record or not, but this is a pretty impressive accomplishment:

    In 1943, 22-year-old Stan Musial hits more 3Bs (20) than he has Ks (18).

    He also has more career 2B (725) than K (696).
    Sam Rice had similar stats: From 1921-1929 he had 124 3B & 124 SO's & in 5 of those years had more triples than strikeouts.

    In his career he had 498 doubles & only 275 strikeouts. Playing in cavernous Griffith Stadium had a lot to do with that!

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  • Sultan_1895-1948
    replied
    Originally posted by Herr28 View Post
    I don't know if it qualifies as a record or not, but this is a pretty impressive accomplishment:

    In 1943, 22-year-old Stan Musial hits more 3Bs (20) than he has Ks (18).
    That's actually one of the more impressive accomplishments I've seen. In a legit full season no doubt.

    Even Cobb never did that in a full season.

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  • Herr28
    replied
    I don't know if it qualifies as a record or not, but this is a pretty impressive accomplishment:

    In 1943, 22-year-old Stan Musial hits more 3Bs (20) than he has Ks (18).

    He also has more career 2B (725) than K (696).

    Leave a comment:


  • 3and2Fastball
    replied
    Tris Speaker's 792 Doubles has always amazed me.

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  • leagueleader
    replied
    Originally posted by RuthMayBond View Post
    Big response there. I'll start with some miscellaneous records near the bottom of my list

    Reds getting 19 straight batters on base
    Bonds 232 walks in a season
    Brooks Robinson's 618 DP by a 3B
    Cobb's 19 straight full years with .300+ BA
    Alexander's 19 straight winning years
    Ruth hitting 88% of his teams Hr's in 1919 Ruth 29 Rest of team 4
    Ted Williams leading league in Slugging pct every year from 1941 to 1955 with asterick*. In some of those years he didn't have enough AB to qualify, still its remarkable.

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  • Sultan_1895-1948
    replied
    This should help put .690 into perspective.

    Take away all 1517 singles and leave the AB the same, essentially giving him in 0-for-1517. He is still at .50910 career SA, just behind Eddie Matthews for #77 all-time.

    Take away all 506 doubles and leave the AB the same, essentially giving him an o-for 506, and he's at .56923, behind Hornsby and ahead of Cabrera for #12 all-time.

    Take away all 136 triples and leave the AB the same, essentially giving him an 0-for 136, and he's at .64114, still seven points ahead of Ballgame's .634.

    Or how bout this. Let's give half proper weight, and the other half, a step down. For instance....

    714 divided by 2 = 357

    357 * 4 = 1428 TB

    The other 357, we'll bump down to the triple level.

    357 * 3 = 1071 TB

    Same for triples....

    136 divided by 2 = 68

    68 * 3 = 204

    Half go to doubles level

    68 * 2 = 136

    Same for doubles

    506 divided by 2 = 253

    253 * 2 = 506

    Half go to singles level

    253 *1 = 253

    If we don't touch the singles, we have 3598 + 1517 = 5115 TB / 8399 AB = .60900 SA. Good for #5 behind Foxx and still ahead of Barroid.

    If we give him credit for half his singles, 758.5, and turn the other half into outs, we have .51869 SA, good for #64 all-time, behind Brouthers, and ahead of Giambi.

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