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Did the 1918 Cubs throw the World Series?

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  • Did the 1918 Cubs throw the World Series?

    http://seattletimes.nwsource.com/htm...80_seam17.html

    Quite an interesting article.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cDxgNjMTPIs

  • #2
    I believe that the circumstances were ripe for a fixed World Series in 1918.

    The game was being shut down for the duration of WW!, and there was no telling when (or even if) the Major Leagues would be back in operation. The 1918 season had also been cut short by a month, causing the players to lose about 1/6th of their salaries.

    1918 was the first year that post-season money would be divided up among the first division teams, and not just the first place teams. This caused a short stoppage of play during the World Series.

    In 1918 attendence was poor throughout the Majors. With the division of Series money being changed, the players were expecting record low shares. The Players were also required to take a percentage of their shares in War Bonds. Koppett's Concise History says that because of the attendance problems, the owners decided to charge a higher price for World Series tickets, which contributed to the low player shares.

    In Burying the Black Sox, Gene Carney stated that during that period, Boston was the center of organized gambling in the US. I don't know if a Boston team made any difference in gampblers approaching players or not.
    Last edited by EdTarbusz; 04-17-2008, 08:41 PM.

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    • #3
      I think the 1969 World Series was fixed.

      Just kidding, of course.

      But 39 years after, I'm still trying to figure out how the Mets pulled that one off.:cap:

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      • #4
        Hmmmm....the players actually threatened to strike because of the poor gate receipts, so it's certainally possible.

        I'm sure there are a lot of things like this we don't know about.
        "Hey Mr. McGraw! Can I pitch to-day?"

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        • #5
          Certainly wouldn't surprise me.
          "I think about baseball when I wake up in the morning. I think about it all day and I dream about it at night. The only time I don't think about it is when I'm playing it."
          Carl Yastrzemski

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Victory Faust View Post
            Hmmmm....the players actually threatened to strike because of the poor gate receipts, so it's certainally possible.

            I'm sure there are a lot of things like this we don't know about.
            The players did strike. They refused to take the field during game four, after discussing the situation on the train ride from Chicago to Boston. A blubbering appeal by Ban Johnson, who told the players that wounded vets were in the stands, got the players to take the field. The strike lasted for about an hour, I believe.

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            • #7
              This is getting more and more interesting.

              Although it would seem to me that going on strike, and throwing games, would conflict with each other. Both have the goal of getting more money, but you have to play games to be able to throw them.
              http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cDxgNjMTPIs

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              • #8
                This is an old story. Ban Johnson is supposed to have suspected a fix during this Series and wanted to investibate the matter, but he couldn't secure any funds form the AL (or National Commission) and quietly dropped the matter.

                Bill Veeck wrote that when he purchased the White Sox, some papers of Harry Grabiner were found, and Grabiner had written down his suspicions about the 1918 Series. Veeck never made public what these papers actually said, and the papers have never turned up.

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                • #9
                  In the article, it says that Harry Grabinger's (sp.?) personal diary has been long lost. I believe Graibinger's diary is an important piece of the puzzle that is missing to this story. Maybe the diary was "accidently" misplaced and destroyed since, perhaps, there was some information that some did not want revealed. Graibinger probably went to his grave knowing the real story to this accusation and the Black Sox scandal more than anyone.

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                  • #10
                    There has long been a strong suspicion that the 1914 WS between the A's and Braves was fixed as well. On paper, the Braves looked inferior to Connie Mack's powerful A's squad. But, the Braves swept in 4 and Mack believed that some of his players intentionally did not put forth their best effort.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Steve Jeltz View Post
                      There has long been a strong suspicion that the 1914 WS between the A's and Braves was fixed as well. On paper, the Braves looked inferior to Connie Mack's powerful A's squad. But, the Braves swept in 4 and Mack believed that some of his players intentionally did not put forth their best effort.
                      Macht's new bio of Mack said that people were accusing Connie Mack of engineering a thrown game in the 1913 World Series, in the belief that he wanted to extend the Series and increase his team's profits.

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                      • #12
                        We know where this one is going, suspicions, what some thought were the ripe conditions for a fix means a big fat zero. We don't know, no one knows, thats how it's going to end. Too much water has gone under the bridge. Who can really know what really took place so many years ago.

                        To discuss fine, thats what makes the board. To prove one way or another, I doubt that.
                        Last edited by SHOELESSJOE3; 04-18-2008, 06:20 AM.

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                        • #13
                          The article states that Cubs pitcher 'Shufflin' Phil Douglas made a very suspicious error that allowed the only two runs scored by Boston in a 2-1 victory. Douglas, of course, proved he was not averse to intentionally influencing the outcome of games when he sent that infamous letter to St. Louis' Les Mann in 1922. Would anyone really be surprised if Douglas did intentionally misplay a ball in the 1918 WS leading directly to a Red Sox victory? I didn't think so.
                          Always go to other people's funerals, otherwise they won't come to yours. - Yogi Berra

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                          • #14
                            I believe anything is possible regarding any World Series being thrown in that era. I think the Black Sox thing had the same effect as Barry Bonds. The powers that be in MLB wanted the public to think that the Black Sox, and only the Black Sox, had thrown the Series in the most corrupt generation ever. It is like today with Bonds. Although many don't buy it, it seems that he is presented as the ultimate cheater, and, along with McGwire, Sosa and a few others, some of the only cheaters, when really, many probably have cheated.

                            So yes, the 1918 Series may have been thrown, but of course, as was already pointed out, it was far too long ago for us to ever know.

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                            • #15
                              That article shows little actual insight into anything. There is no meat - to me no legit story, just speculation. The article completely turned me off with it's conclusion wrapped up in a quote from a T-shirt salesman.

                              Frankly, Cicotte mouthing off and deflecting blame to a supposed event prior to 1919 doesn't hold much water with me.

                              Attributing an error to Douglas 90 years later as "suspicious" is completely without merit or base. Just jaw flapping - for some that might be enough to assign guilt but I'm no so sure.

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