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Some Cheating is Acceptable

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  • Some Cheating is Acceptable

    When the Yankees acquired Perry's services, his new teammates were ecstatic. The fact that many of them had complained he loaded up the ball became irrelevant.

    If a player cheats, the punishments may be adjusted to fit the crime, but the fact remains that he cheated.

    http://baseball.suite101.com/article..._is_acceptable
    Baseball articles you might not like but should read.

  • #2
    Originally posted by LouGehrig View Post
    When the Yankees acquired Perry's services, his new teammates were ecstatic. The fact that many of them had complained he loaded up the ball became irrelevant.

    If a player cheats, the punishments may be adjusted to fit the crime, but the fact remains that he cheated.

    http://baseball.suite101.com/article..._is_acceptable
    Nothing new, nothing unique about the Yanks acceptance of Perry, now he's on their side. You can bet had he gone to a dozen other teams they would accept him as is, now on their side. It's probably more worthy of that author bringing it up simply because it's those guys from NY in the pinstripes.

    Not quite the same but Ricky Henderson not well like by some teams, hot dog at times, until he puts on their uniform, now they love him.

    Perry and the spitter over blown, not a free pass, if he threw one that was enough he broke a rule. But how many did he really throw. The opposing bench, the first and third base coaches of the opposing team, the umpires, the TV cameras with slo-mo and frame by frame, all eyes on him and it takes 20 seasons before he is caught and ejected. I've heard them all, catchers and infieders scuffing the ball on shin guards and belt buckles but don't you think the opposing teams were also watching everyone with Perry on the mound. More than a dozen times umps walking to the mound giving him the once over..................one ejection and that was after 20 seasons.
    Last edited by SHOELESSJOE3; 05-16-2008, 10:14 AM.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by LouGehrig View Post
      When the Yankees acquired Perry's services, his new teammates were ecstatic. The fact that many of them had complained he loaded up the ball became irrelevant.

      If a player cheats, the punishments may be adjusted to fit the crime, but the fact remains that he cheated.

      http://baseball.suite101.com/article..._is_acceptable
      All cheating is not created equal. There are different levels of cheating, each having a different impact on the game at the time, and historically speaking. An ump can catch a player with a corked bat or scuffing the ball at that moment. An ump will not do anything about a runner on second relaying signs. That is to be dealt with by players. An ump will not do anything about a batters foot being outside the box, or a pitcher's entire foot not being in contact with the rubber.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Sultan_1895-1948 View Post
        All cheating is not created equal. There are different levels of cheating, each having a different impact on the game at the time, and historically speaking. An ump can catch a player with a corked bat or scuffing the ball at that moment. An ump will not do anything about a runner on second relaying signs. That is to be dealt with by players. An ump will not do anything about a batters foot being outside the box, or a pitcher's entire foot not being in contact with the rubber.
        No one is denying what you state. I am merely stating that whether it is using a corked bat or having a foot outside the batting box, it is against the rules. The fact that the umpire does not enforce a rule does not mean that no transgression occurred.
        Baseball articles you might not like but should read.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by LouGehrig View Post
          No one is denying what you state. I am merely stating that whether it is using a corked bat or having a foot outside the batting box, it is against the rules. The fact that the umpire does not enforce a rule does not mean that no transgression occurred.
          I agree. And my point was simply, that the reason some things slide and others don't, is due to impact on the game. What would a batter get, if a shortstop thew his glove in the air on a line drive over his head? A triple I believe. Impact. They look at that as more important, than whether that same hitter, smudged out the back box line, and was out of it to begin with.
          Last edited by Sultan_1895-1948; 05-16-2008, 03:20 PM.

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