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Unluckiest Man in Baseball History

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  • #31
    The unluckiest guy in baseball is Pete Rose. Here's a guy that has the all-time hits record, won lots of World Series with the Big Red Machine, but there's one problem. HE IS NOT IN THE HALL OF FAME. This guy was probably the one who hustled the most. He played his heart out and he is not in the HOF because of one mistake. They better put him in before he dies because if they don't, that's just terrible.

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    • #32
      was it ever proven that j.r. richard did cocaine?

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      • #33
        Originally posted by Mantle7
        The unluckiest guy in baseball is Pete Rose. Here's a guy that has the all-time hits record, won lots of World Series with the Big Red Machine, but there's one problem. HE IS NOT IN THE HALL OF FAME. This guy was probably the one who hustled the most. He played his heart out and he is not in the HOF because of one mistake. They better put him in before he dies because if they don't, that's just terrible.

        What was his mistake, not hiding his betting slips better or not choosing bookies and friends who wouldn't talk?
        Dave Bill Tom George Mark Bob Ernie Soupy Dick Alex Sparky
        Joe Gary MCA Emanuel Sonny Dave Earl Stan
        Jonathan Neil Roger Anthony Ray Thomas Art Don
        Gates Philip John Warrior Rik Casey Tony Horace
        Robin Bill Ernie JEDI

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        • #34
          good to see

          pete had miserable luck to run into a succession of stooges in umpire pallone and his giant bag of issues; commissioner sluggo, representing the east coast prejudice ruling baseball, inc. and Chief Inspectagator Ken Starr.

          Pete's already in the only Hall of Fame that matters. That other one has been hopelessly diminished by the army of desk clerks and special interests that own it and fight over it.
          Why you do this to me, Dimi?

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          • #35
            Originally posted by ElHalo
            Plenty of good comes from getting drunk. If it wasn't for getting drunk, most of us would never have been born.

            Come on now. Everybody's gotten drunk and rowdy, most of us probably dozens of times. I don't think any of us ever expected to die because of it (unless we were stupid enough to try driving after getting drunk and rowdy).

            Delehanty was drinking on a train. He wasn't driving, he wasn't opperating heavy machinery. He was sitting on a train. Of course he was drinking; what else would he do? Could he possibly have expected that they'd kick him off the train in the middle of nowhere and he'd get hit by another train/ fall off a bridge/ whatever?

            Sorry, you can't say that Delahanty deserved to die because he'd been drinking. If that were true, then 99% of all people on Earth would deserve to die, many of them several times a day.
            Ok RMB as much as it pains me is right...

            Big Ed put himself in that situation by the following bad choices

            1) Only reason he was on the train was 'jumping', ironically, he was about to join McGraw and the Giants and renegging on his Washington Nationals contract

            2) Only reason he was kicked off was for being not drunk...but drunk and disorderly...harrasing passangers

            3) So drunk that he never thought that stumbling over thin railroad tracks over a bridge wasn't exactly a great idea.

            of course there are still rumors that he was robbed and tossed off, since his wallet and numerous other expensive items were not found on his body

            Addie Joss is in the same boat...except he was just stubborn and pig headed...he fainted in a game and apologized ot his teammates for being a wimp. If only he got help when he started feeling sick instead of being a tough guy, he could have lived...shame, he was a great P. His teammate was the same Elmer Flick, although I am not sure they had any cure for bleeding ulcers at the time.

            Pete Rose and Ray Chapman had their own actions lead to what happened...true Chapman just got hit an inch in the temple that caused death but his head was in the strike zone.

            I mean Frank Chance missed ALOT of games by getting hit in the head, he suffered hearing loss, brain hemmoragging and a coma...hows that for luck

            I must say Dave Dravecky tops anyone thus far on the list...
            Last edited by Imapotato; 07-07-2004, 06:52 PM.

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            • #36
              Originally posted by Imapotato
              Ok RMB as much as it pains me is right...
              Duh!
              I will cherish this post forever
              Mythical SF Chronicle scouting report: "That Jeff runs like a deer. Unfortunately, he also hits AND throws like one." I am Venus DeMilo - NO ARM! I can play like a big leaguer, I can field like Luzinski, run like Lombardi. The secret to managing is keeping the ones who hate you away from the undecided ones. I am a triumph of quantity over quality. I'm almost useful, every village needs an idiot.
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              • #37
                I must chime in here and say that, although you all have good arguments and perspectives, Craig Biggio is at least in the top 10.

                Getting drilled 268 times must be TERRIBLE.
                Thank goodness it didn't take away much from his playing time over the years...
                -David
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                • #38
                  Ned Garvin was very unlucky. Look at his win-loss records compared to his ERAs. 57-97 career won-loss record (.370 pct.) with a 2.72 career ERA (124 ERA+).
                  Last edited by 538280; 06-29-2005, 06:07 PM.

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                  • #39
                    Oscar Charleston and Satchel Paige. Two tons of talent, two ounces of opportunity.

                    Joe Jackson might've been somewhat complicit, but the poor guy couldn't just be on a team going for WS wins.
                    (fantasy football)
                    JM: Only did that for a couple of years and then we had a conspiracy so it kind of turned me sour. Our league's commissioner, Lew Ford(notes) at the time, was doing some shady things that ... I'd rather not talk about [laughs].
                    DB: Isn't he in Japan right now?
                    JM: I don't know where Lou is right now. He's probably fleeing the authorities [laughs].

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                    • #40
                      Unluckiest in History? I don't know but Cleveland Indians minor league pitcher Kyle Denney's been shot, hit in the elbow with a bat and had his skull fractured by a line drive. Too early to tell how he'll measure up to the all-time unluckiest players but he shows great promise.

                      http://sports.espn.go.com/minorlbb/n...ory?id=2096095
                      Last edited by zman; 06-29-2005, 08:19 PM.

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                      • #41
                        Originally posted by RuthMayBond
                        but what good comes of getting drunk?
                        So many children

                        Waddell always wanted to wrestle anyone who he coaxed into it. I understand that he was undefeated. He injured his arm wresling Andy Coakly then the team-mates refused to play until Mack kicked him off the team.

                        Definitely Drabecki ranks pretty high as unlucky... Except he was a MLB pitcher and played in the WS.
                        Last edited by HDH; 06-29-2005, 08:33 PM.
                        In the 1920's, Harry Heilmann led the AL with a .364 average. In addition, he averaged 220 hits, 45 doubles, 12 triples, 16 homers, 110 runs, and 130 RBI.

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                        • #42
                          The more I think about it, the more it has to be Dravecky. At least things were over quickly for Delahanty. Fosse and Canigliaro didn't die. Chapman lingered for a few days, but his suffering was over relatively quickly too.

                          But Dravecky? Cancer, arm falls off in the middle of a pitch, arm re-injured in a celebretory pileup, more cancer... all of this would make him unlucky, but not more than a whole lot of other people. No, the kicker to me is that years later, after he's had his arm cut off and thinks all of his problems are in his past, he gets hit by a bus. I'm not a religious man (though Dravecky, inexplicably, is; he has his own internet ministry), but if I were Dravecky, I'd see getting hit by the bus as pretty much definitive proof that God hates me.
                          "Simply put, the passion, interest and tradition surrounding baseball in New York is unmatched."

                          Sean McAdam, ESPN.com

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                          • #43
                            Originally posted by zman
                            Unluckiest in History? I don't know but Cleveland Indians minor league pitcher Kyle Denney's been shot, hit in the elbow with a bat and had his skull fractured by a line drive. Too early to tell how he'll measure up to the all-time unluckiest players but he shows great promise.

                            http://sports.espn.go.com/minorlbb/n...ory?id=2096095
                            A game of inches...guess he should be glad that his luck held up to keep him inches from getting hurt worse each time.

                            And that should be it for him with bad luck if bad luck comes in threes...
                            Best posts ever:
                            Originally posted by nymdan
                            Too... much... math... head... hurts...
                            Originally posted by RuthMayBond
                            I understand, I lost all my marbles years ago

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                            • #44
                              Originally posted by ElHalo
                              The more I think about it, the more it has to be Dravecky. At least things were over quickly for Delahanty. Fosse and Canigliaro didn't die. Chapman lingered for a few days, but his suffering was over relatively quickly too.

                              But Dravecky? Cancer, arm falls off in the middle of a pitch, arm re-injured in a celebretory pileup, more cancer... all of this would make him unlucky, but not more than a whole lot of other people. No, the kicker to me is that years later, after he's had his arm cut off and thinks all of his problems are in his past, he gets hit by a bus. I'm not a religious man (though Dravecky, inexplicably, is; he has his own internet ministry), but if I were Dravecky, I'd see getting hit by the bus as pretty much definitive proof that God hates me.
                              As far as I understand, Dravecky is not only a religious man, but a member of the John Birch Society and known in baseball as somewhat of a white supremacist.
                              I'll save my sad feelings for the Clementes of the world who sacrificed themselves for the sake of others, and for the Gehrigs who were struck down by a terrible uncurable disease and had to face an inevitable debilitating death.
                              "Where have you gone Joe DiMaggio, a nation turns its lonely eyes to you. What's that you say Mrs. Robinson? Joltin' Joe has left and gone away. Hey hey hey."

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                              • #45
                                I think Roy Campanella was a pretty unlucky guy. First he was kept out of the majors because he was black. Then he got in and won the MVP every other year, until he was paralyzed in January 1958 (never got to play in L.A.). And it doesn't stop there.

                                "In spring training of 1954, he chipped a bone in the heel of his left hand and damaged a nerve. It affected his hitting and limited him to 111 games. Surgery helped in 1955, but the problem returned the next year. Then, in January 1958, Campanella was permanently disabled in an automobile accident. Returning home from his liquor store, which he ran in the off-season, he lost control of his car on an icy street. The car slammed into a telephone pole and flipped over, pinning him behind the steering wheel. The crash fractured his fifth cervical vertebra and damaged his spinal cord.

                                Despite surgery to relieve pressure on his spinal column, nothing could be done to repair the fracture and dislocation of his fifth and sixth vertebrae. Campanella, at 36, was paralyzed from the chest down.

                                Three days after the operation, his condition worsened when he was stricken with pneumonia and his left lung collapsed. Although the pneumonia passed, Campanella's paralysis remained unchanged.

                                After three months at Glen Cove Community Hospital, Campy was moved to the Rusk Institute for Rehabilitative Medicine at New York University-Bellevue Hospital. He wouldn't return home until that November.

                                The accident cost him more than his career. His first marriage, to Ruthe with whom he had five children, broke up as Ruthe was accused of physically and verbally abusing Campy."

                                Talk about bad things happening to good people.

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