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Worst Pitching Staffs of All-Time

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  • AstrosFan
    replied
    Z-Scores, again since the turn of the 20th century:

    Code:
    Year	City		Team		Z-Score	ERA+
    1984	Oakland		Athletics	-2.92	82.9
    2006	Washington	Nationals	-2.62	84.7
    1993	Oakland		Athletics	-2.50	82.8
    1982	Oakland		Athletics	-2.48	85.3
    1996	Detroit		Tigers		-2.47	80.0
    1992	Philadelphia	Phillies	-2.39	85.2
    1984	San Francisco	Giants		-2.32	80.1
    1997	Oakland		Athletics	-2.28	80.8
    1927	Philadelphia	Phillies	-2.25	73.0
    1974	San Diego	Padres		-2.23	77.4

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  • AstrosFan
    replied
    Top ten lowest team ERA+ since the turn of the 20th century:

    Code:
    Year	City		Team		ERA+
    1915	Philadelphia	Athletics	67.6
    1916	Philadelphia	Athletics	72.7
    1927	Philadelphia	Phillies	73.0
    1904	Washington	Senators	73.1
    1909	St. Louis	Cardinals	73.7
    1911	Boston		Braves		74.0
    1954	Philadelphia	Athletics	75.5
    1944	Brooklyn	Dodgers		75.6
    1907	Boston		Braves		76.2
    1905	Brooklyn	Dodgers		76.3

    Leave a comment:


  • RubeWaddell19
    replied
    My first thought was the 1930 Phillies. But, I didn't realize that the 1996 Tigers pitching was that bad. PHEW

    The St. Louis Browns of 1935 - 1940 are also a candidate.

    Leave a comment:


  • White Knight
    replied
    How about Stump Merrill's 1991 Yankees?

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  • abolishthedh
    replied
    Originally posted by BillyF29 View Post
    1977 San Diego Padres, lots of walks, runs, and not very many SO's
    The 1970s Padres teams were almost always bad, but what made them historically bad was the fact that they played in the same stadium which would later be renamed Qualcomm. The stadium was named Jack Murphy Stadium at the time, and during much of the 1970s the outfield fence was 17' high, and the distances were longer than most in the league. The few Padre pitchers who knew how to pitch were recognized for it: Randy Jones' strong seasons in 1975-76, Gaylord Perry's in 1978, and Rollie Fingers.

    Most of the Padre staffs seemed to be pulled out of the ticket line.

    Leave a comment:


  • 1905 Giants
    replied
    Originally posted by Seattle1 View Post
    I hate to say it but the Mariners pitching staff stinks so far this year. But at least we don't have Weaver anymore.

    Very True.

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  • Seattle1
    replied
    I hate to say it but the Mariners pitching staff stinks so far this year. But at least we don't have Weaver anymore.

    Leave a comment:


  • 1905 Giants
    replied
    Originally posted by Solair Wright View Post
    In the modern era, it would definitely be the 1996 Detroit Tigers, when they posted their second 100-game losing season in seven years. (1989, and 1996) How were the '89 and 2003 Tigers' pitching staff, by comparison?
    The 1989 staff had an ERA+ of 85, although Mike Henneman did fine with an 11-4 record and 8 saves to go along with a 3.70 ERA for an ERA+ of 104

    The 2003 staff had an ERA+ of 81, with only 3 pitchers getting above a .500 win perecntage (Steve Avery at 2-0, Brian Schmack at 1-0, and Jamie Walker at 4-3).

    Leave a comment:


  • TonyK
    replied
    I like the 1890 Pittsburg Alleghenys (NL)...a 23-113 record and they gave up 1,235 runs in 136 games or close to 10 runs per game. The team's winningest pitcher that year won 4 games! The club used 7 pitchers who were between the ages of 18 and 21.

    Leave a comment:


  • BillyF29
    replied
    1977 San Diego Padres, lots of walks, runs, and not very many SO's

    But hey, Rollie Fingers was second in the league in Saves!

    Leave a comment:


  • jjpm74
    replied
    Originally posted by bob View Post
    Kind of highlights the problem of placing 19th century hitters compared to 20th century hitters. Facing teams which have embarassing pitching staff certainly is going to help your averages.
    Keep in mind that throughout baseball's entire history, there's always been a team in last place.

    Leave a comment:


  • Solair Wright
    replied
    In the modern era, it would definitely be the 1996 Detroit Tigers, when they posted their second 100-game losing season in seven years. (1989, and 1996) How were the '89 and 2003 Tigers' pitching staff, by comparison?

    Leave a comment:


  • bob
    replied
    Kind of highlights the problem of placing 19th century hitters compared to 20th century hitters. Facing teams which have embarassing pitching staff certainly is going to help your averages.

    Leave a comment:


  • jjpm74
    replied
    In the modern era, the 1996 Tigers take the cake. In the early history of the game, there were quite a few that were worse:

    1872 Rockford Eckfords 3-26 60 ERA+
    1873 Washington Blue Legs 8-31 70 ERA+
    1874 Elizabeth Canaries 9-78 72 ERA+
    1875 Brooklyn Atlantics 2-42 59 ERA+
    1875 New Haven Elm Citys 7-40 69 ERA+
    1875 Washington Nationals 5-23 54 ERA+
    1876 Cincinatti Reds 9-56 60 ERA+
    1876 Philadelphia Athletics 14-45 74 ERA+
    1877 Cincinatti Reds 15-42 63 ERA+
    1879 Troy Trojans 19-56 89 ERA+
    1879 Syracuse Stars 22-48 74 ERA+
    1880 Buffalo Bisons 24-58 79 ERA+

    and so on...

    Leave a comment:


  • dgarza
    replied
    Originally posted by bob View Post
    Yea i hardly think a team which played 6 games can be called the worst ever.
    They would have loved to have you as their publicist.

    Leave a comment:

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