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All-Time Favorite "Exhilarating" Baseball Moments from Your Lifetime

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  • Stadium Al
    replied
    1963 the second game of a doubleheader the Yankees vs Balt. Mickey Mantle is called on to pinch hit after just coming off the diabled list. With the count of one and one Mickey launches a fly that just clears the fence in left field and fifty thousand fans go wild. Now some 42 years later it is still one of the greatest baseball events I have ever witnessed.
    Alan

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  • FrenchyLefebvre
    replied
    TMC <<<In other words, moments of triumph that made you want to be that directly involved somehow or made you want to cry.<<<

    At the risk of going off base here, but based on this criteria:

    NO other event I ever witnessed in baseball (non Schmidt/Phillies related) was more powerful than Cal Ripken passing Gehrig 9/5/95. Considering the previous night as well, could lump these two games into one colossal event spanning two days! And John Tesh's "Day One" playing ...

    Not even being from Baltimore, don't know if anything - in any sport - could ever top that.

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  • Dodger Green
    replied
    Originally posted by ElHalo
    Best exhilarating moment didn't even have to do with what was going on on the field.

    With the Yankees down two runs in the top of the ninth of game 5 of the 2001 WS, it appeared that the Yanks were going to go back to Phoenix down 3-2. The Yankees' fans should have been dejected. However, they knew that Paul O'Neill was retiring at the end of the series, and they had to give him his moment. For the entire half inning, the 60,000 people in the stadium chanted O'Neill's name over and over and over... for ten or fifteen solid minutes straight. It was the most beautiful thing I've ever seen.
    I remember that - I was only 16 at the time. And even though hatred of the Yankees is the quintessence of my soul, I remember clapping for O'Neil. In a room, by myself, I clapped for him. Who the hell didn't like Paul O'Neill?

    Great one, ElHalo.

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  • ElHalo
    replied
    Best exhilarating moment didn't even have to do with what was going on on the field.

    With the Yankees down two runs in the top of the ninth of game 5 of the 2001 WS, it appeared that the Yanks were going to go back to Phoenix down 3-2. The Yankees' fans should have been dejected. However, they knew that Paul O'Neill was retiring at the end of the series, and they had to give him his moment. For the entire half inning, the 60,000 people in the stadium chanted O'Neill's name over and over and over... for ten or fifteen solid minutes straight. It was the most beautiful thing I've ever seen.

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  • BadKarma
    replied
    Ya, I remember watching that play. BTW, what was up with the WhiteSox unis back then?

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  • keving7
    replied
    Originally posted by Bench 5
    10) Carlton Fisk tagged out two runners back to back in a late season game in 1983. One of the coolest plays I've ever seen. The lead runner was only about 5 feet in front of the trailer. It was a bang-bang-bang play.
    I'm pretty sure this was against the Yankees. Rickey Henderson doubled into a double play. One of the runners was Dale Berra.

    Being a Yankee fan, I have to go with the Chris Chambliss's HR in the ALCS. It ended what was approx. a 20 year drought for the Yankees. It didn't matter that the Reds swept them in the W.S.

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  • Williamsburg2599
    replied
    Assuming you dont mean personal moments, it has to be 2004 redsoxs season.It took me two days to relize they had really won it :gt

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  • SamtheBravesFan
    replied
    May 22, 1996 - I was at an Atlanta Braves game and they were playing against the Chicago Cubs. My little brother's friend had given us his family's field-level tickets because they knew it was my birthday. Anyway, I forget what Cub was at bat at the time, but whoever it was, he just smoked this one pitch. And Marquis Grissom leapt and caught the ball and THWACK!!! he hit against the outfield wall. I could swear I felt the vibrations coming from that fence, and I swear that there was silence for a split second. When he hung onto the ball for the out, the place just went nuts.

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  • Pghfan987
    replied
    Most exciting on tv: Sid Bream beating the Pirates in the '92 NLCS (although it broke my heart.)

    Most exciting play I saw in person (I have never seen a playoff game in person): Brian Giles' catch in 2004. People have robbed home runs before, but Brian robbed a home run in left field by climbing the wall, hanging, and reaching three feet into the stands. PNC Park- a stadium that is oftentimes dormant- absolutely erupted.

    I am sure there are other plays that are of greater significance to baseball in general, but since the Pirates are what really matter to me, these are the plays that stick out in my mind.

    The other one would be Byung-Hyun Kim giving up the two homers in Games 4 and 5 of the 2001 World Series. My roommate, who was from Korea, was watching the game with me. We were both cheering for the D-Backs- he was so proud of his Korean pitcher, but then so distraught when he didn't come through.

    Mark

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  • Victory Faust
    replied
    My favorite moment involved Kirk Gibson, but it wasn't his '88 World Series homer, or even his two homers in the '84 Series, which were all great moments.

    But, for me, the moment that stands out happened at the end of the 1981 season. During the second half of the strike-induced split season, I have never seen a player carry a team like Gibby carried the Tigers. It was like Yaz in '67, without all the publicity.

    Anyway, the Tigers were in a tight race with Milwaukee for the second-half pennant. Toward the end of the year, there was a crucial game against the Orioles. The Tigers were losing by 3 or 4 runs going into the bottom of the ninth inning. Well, Gibby came up and hit a three-run jack to tie up the game. And this wasn't just any homer -- it was an absolute blast. The Oriole outfielder (I think it was Benny Ayala) didn't move an inch. BAM! -- and in 1/10th of a second, the ball slammed against the right-field roof, bounced a few times, then fell to the field.

    Strangers were hugging each other. Vendors dropped their hot-dog carts and jumped for joy. It was the most incredible moment I've ever experienced in a ballpark.

    Then, the Tigers went and lost the game in extra innings. That kind of waters down the story -- but not the memory.

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  • BadKarma
    replied
    My all time favorite that I was at live:

    Tom Seaver's 300th win against the Yankees in Yankee Stadium. I swear that day there was more Mets "Seaver" shirts in the stadium then Yankees crap. Seaver was finishing up his career with the White Sox at that time. I still have my ticket stub for that game. As a lifelong Mets fan, it doesn't get too much better then that; one of your heroes reaches a milestone against the team that you hate


    On TV:

    A hobbled Kirk Gibson hitting that dramatic HR for the Dodgers in the 1988 World Series, then his celebratory pumping of the fists and hobbled trot around the bases. I never really liked the guy, but when you see something like that it just sends chills down your spine and you wish you were there.

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  • Dodger Green
    replied
    Of the ones that haven't been mentioned:

    Game 161 of the 2004 season, Dodgers down 3-0 against the Giants going to the bottom of the 9th. A series of hits and error, capped by Steve Finley's division winning grand slam.

    I almost tore the door off my bedroom I was so happy, jumping up and down.

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  • west coast orange and black
    replied
    stickin' to in-person occasions:

    the good of it
    bobby bonds' home debut.
    frank robinson at the helm on opening day for the giants.
    brian johnson's first-pitch home run in the 12th to beat the hated dodgers in late 1997.
    the final giants game at candlestick park, in 1999.
    jt snow's homerun to tie game 2 of the 2000 playoffs against the mets.

    the not-so good
    1989 earthquake just prior to game 3 at candlestick park.
    the hated dodgers beating the giants on the final game of 2003 to deprive a one-game playoff with the braves.

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  • tmc_6882
    replied
    [QUOTE=FatAngel]
    Originally posted by yanks0714
    This ones easy for me:


    3) The 1986 WS. Buckner's blunder. Calvin Schiraldi. Bob Stanley. It was the most stunning turn of events I've ever watched. It was then that i just KNEW there really was a 'Curse of the Bambino'.



    I´m too young to have watched this live and get the excitement of the moment - but from what I read what preceded this famous error it´s hardly Buckner´s fault the Sox lost.
    But it´s a fine example how cruel The Game can be, because Buckner enjoyed a career 99% of all Major Leaguers would have died for - 21 seasons.
    My recent favorite is the entire 2004 ALCS, although I´m neither a Sox fan nor a Yankee hater
    The Bill Bunker error (and to a lesser extent, Leon Durham's error in Game 5 of the 1984 NLCS) is another one of those moments which came in my lifetime, but I still wish I was able to watch it as it happened live (I was four years old at the time). I guess was stands out the most about the Buckner play was Vin Scully's often-repeated call (Scully, as far as I now, rarely raises his voice out of sheer excitement or disbelief) off of NBC.

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  • FatAngel
    replied
    [QUOTE=yanks0714]This ones easy for me:


    3) The 1986 WS. Buckner's blunder. Calvin Schiraldi. Bob Stanley. It was the most stunning turn of events I've ever watched. It was then that i just KNEW there really was a 'Curse of the Bambino'.



    I&#180;m too young to have watched this live and get the excitement of the moment - but from what I read what preceded this famous error it&#180;s hardly Buckner&#180;s fault the Sox lost.
    But it&#180;s a fine example how cruel The Game can be, because Buckner enjoyed a career 99% of all Major Leaguers would have died for - 21 seasons.
    My recent favorite is the entire 2004 ALCS, although I&#180;m neither a Sox fan nor a Yankee hater
    Last edited by FatAngel; 03-14-2006, 02:17 PM.

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