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Least RBIs with 500+ ABs

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  • Least RBIs with 500+ ABs

    I've been trying to find out if Enzo Hernandez has the record of the least amount of RBI's with 500+ at bats. In 1971 his stats were:

    G-143 AB-549 R-58 H-122 2B-9 3B-3 HR-0 RBI-12 BB-54 K-34 AVG-.222 SLG-.250

    Anyone know of a lesser amount.

    I remember Hernandez from wasting my youth at the 'Murph, and the announcer really "announcing" Enzo's name. Think it was the same announcer who did the San Diego Gulls (?).

  • #2
    you know your a bad hitter when your slugging average is lower than your OBP

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    • #3
      In terms of career the record holder is either Steve Brady with 0 RBI's in 1817 AB's or Ed Swartwood with 4 RBI's in 2877 AB's. Depending on how one wants to look at it.

      In terms of single seaons and over 500 AB's, Enzo does indeed have the lowest total with over 500 AB's.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Ubiquitous
        In terms of career the record holder is either Steve Brady with 0 RBI's in 1817 AB's
        Where are you getting this from?
        Mythical SF Chronicle scouting report: "That Jeff runs like a deer. Unfortunately, he also hits AND throws like one." I am Venus DeMilo - NO ARM! I can play like a big leaguer, I can field like Luzinski, run like Lombardi. The secret to managing is keeping the ones who hate you away from the undecided ones. I am a triumph of quantity over quality. I'm almost useful, every village needs an idiot.
        Good traders: MadHatter(2), BoofBonser26, StormSurge

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        • #5
          But that Jerry McCormick
          Mythical SF Chronicle scouting report: "That Jeff runs like a deer. Unfortunately, he also hits AND throws like one." I am Venus DeMilo - NO ARM! I can play like a big leaguer, I can field like Luzinski, run like Lombardi. The secret to managing is keeping the ones who hate you away from the undecided ones. I am a triumph of quantity over quality. I'm almost useful, every village needs an idiot.
          Good traders: MadHatter(2), BoofBonser26, StormSurge

          Comment


          • #6
            Since 1891 Enzo's figure is the worst for a single season.
            Buck O'Neil: The Monarch of Baseball

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            • #7
              Originally posted by RuthMayBond
              Where are you getting this from?

              I'm wrong on it sigh. The other day I accidentally removed my database program and have had to use other programs (which turn out to be less reliable)for my info. The problem was solved and I'll be getting a new office package this monday. Thank god I kept my old school ID. Its kind of ironic, in school all you want to do is get rid of your ID and get a fake one, now many years later I need my school Id.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Ubiquitous
                In terms of career the record holder is either Steve Brady with 0 RBI's in 1817 AB's or Ed Swartwood with 4 RBI's in 2877 AB's. Depending on how one wants to look at it.
                Old databases don't include RBI's for many years of the AA in the 1880's. The worst career I've seen (2000+ PA) is Morrie Rath, who had 92 RBI in 2405 PA.
                Si quaeris peninsulam amoenam, circumspice.

                Comprehensive Reform for the Veterans Committee -- Fixing the Hall continued.

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                • #9
                  Excluding some players from the 1880's and starting from 1891 I have Dean Chance at 16 in 662 AB's. Gaylord Perry at 1076 AB, Morrie Rath at 2048 AB, Harry Bay at 2638 AB, Sonny Jackson at 3055, Frank Taveras at 4043, Bud Harrelson at 4744, Roy Thomas at 5296, Miller Huggins at 5558, Donie Bush at 7210, Maury Wills at 7588, Larry Bowa at 8418, Bert Campaneris at 8684, Nellie Fox at 9232, and Luis Aparicio at 10,230.

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                  • #10
                    A few years back, I was trying to find full-time players whose triple crown numbers were as poor as Enzo's in 1971. I found two other contenders for all-time worst triple crown numbers in one season.
                    Code:
                    Player     	Year	HR	RBI	BA	PA	OPS+
                    Enzo Hernandez	1971	0	12	.222	618	61
                    Eddie Joost	1943	2	20	.185	496	60
                    Chas Jamieson	1918	0	11	.202	473	60
                    Si quaeris peninsulam amoenam, circumspice.

                    Comprehensive Reform for the Veterans Committee -- Fixing the Hall continued.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Ubiquitous
                      In terms of career the record holder is either Steve Brady with 0 RBI's in 1817 AB's or Ed Swartwood with 4 RBI's in 2877 AB's. Depending on how one wants to look at it.

                      In terms of single seaons and over 500 AB's, Enzo does indeed have the lowest total with over 500 AB's.
                      Totally off the top of my head Luis Castillo and Matty? Alou (one of the Alou brothers) come to mind. Castillo had some ridiculously low total a few years ago and Matty a similarly futile season somewhere in the late 60's.

                      This also made me think of Tony Clark's unique season last year- I think he set the alltime record for fewest runs scored by anyone with 30+ homeruns. His run total was impossibly low for a guy who drove himself in that much.

                      Freakshow, what's the threshold for a fulltime player? Does Bill Bergen come close in any of his campaigns?

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Freakshow
                        A few years back, I was trying to find full-time players whose triple crown numbers were as poor as Enzo's in 1971. I found two other contenders for all-time worst triple crown numbers in one season.
                        Code:
                        Player     	Year	HR	RBI	BA	PA	OPS+
                        Enzo Hernandez	1971	0	12	.222	618	61
                        Eddie Joost	1943	2	20	.185	496	60
                        Chas Jamieson	1918	0	11	.202	473	60
                        Nothing like WWII baseball, Eddie Joost had one bad season. Thanks for the information everyone

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by csh19792001
                          Freakshow, what's the threshold for a fulltime player? Does Bill Bergen come close in any of his campaigns?
                          I was looking for the classic 3.1 plate appearances per team game. Bergen's high in PA was only 372 (in 154 game seasons), not really close to this threshold.
                          Si quaeris peninsulam amoenam, circumspice.

                          Comprehensive Reform for the Veterans Committee -- Fixing the Hall continued.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Tony Womack's last season misses the threshold too, but boy was he bad.

                            G AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI SB CS BB SO BA OBP SLG

                            108 329 46 82 8 1 0 15 27 5 12 49 .249 .276 .280

                            OPS+ 47

                            THE REVOLUTION WILL NOT COME WITH A SCORECARD

                            In the avy: AZ - Doe or Die

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by digglahhh
                              Tony Womack's last season misses the threshold too, but boy was he bad.

                              G AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI SB CS BB SO BA OBP SLG

                              108 329 46 82 8 1 0 15 27 5 12 49 .249 .276 .280

                              OPS+ 47

                              That's nothin'.

                              Code:
                              YEAR TEAM         AGE G    AB    R    H    2B  3B  HR   HR%   RBI  BB   SO   SB   CS  AVG   SLG  OBA   OPS
                              1906 Dodgers      28  103   353    9   56   3   3   0   0.00   19    7    0    2   0  .159  .184  .175  .359 
                              1909 Dodgers      31  112   346   16   48   1   1   1   0.29   15   10    0    4   0  .139  .156  .163  .319
                              That's an OPS+ of 12 and 1 (yet, the number one). How good was this guy defensively? Well, he played just under 1,000 games in the major leagues with a career line of .170/.194/.201.

                              August 23, 1909: With lefthander Jim Pastorius pitching, Brooklyn C Bill Bergen throws out six (erroneously listed as 7) of eight base-stealing Cardinals in a 9-1 St. Louis victory. Bergen's mark is a 20th century high, twice tied in 1915. In the first game of the doubleheader, it was Brooklyn's turn as they swiped six bases in a 7-0 win. The Cards steal two bases.

                              Alas, if the descriptions could stop there, Billy, as he was sometimes called, may have faded into anonymity rather than ignominy.


                              Baseball Library

                              The caption beneath Bill Bergen's image in a 1908 issue of The Sporting News stated that he "ranks with the best receivers in modern baseball. He is an intelligent student of the points of a batsman, a true and fast thrower and is without a peer in judging and capturing foul flies."

                              Alas, if the descriptions could stop there, Billy, as he was sometimes called, may have faded into anonymity rather than ignominy. But decades after his career ended, baseball historians became fascinated with his offensive ineptitude. Bergen's lifetime batting average of .170 stands as the nadir of futility; no other major leaguer with 2,500 at bats finished his career with a batting average lower than .210. He collected only two home runs in 3,028 at bats, which is noteworthy even for the Deadball Era. Bergen's lifetime on-base percentage is a deplorable .194, and his .201 lifetime slugging percentage is just as bad. One other peculiar statistic stands out: In 3,028 at bats he was never hit by a pitch, which may be indicative of his approach to hitting--and lack of success.

                              The second son of Michael and Catherine (Delaney) Bergen, both of whom were born in Ireland, William Aloysius Bergen was born on June 13, 1878, in North Brookfield, Massachusetts. As a youngster Bill learned the skills of catching from his brother, Martin, nearly seven years older. Marty Bergen went on to become an excellent National League backstop for the 1896-99 Boston Beaneaters. Today, however, he is remembered as the much-troubled soul who tragically murdered his wife and children before taking his own life in January 1900. In sharp contrast to his psychotic brother, Bill Bergen was personable and got along well with his teammates.

                              Bill began his professional career in 1898 with Pawtucket of the New England League.

                              Graduating to the Inter-State League in 1899, he played the next two seasons for Fort Wayne, Indiana. One afternoon, after Fort Wayne had fallen into a bases-loaded, no-out predicament, Bergen demonstrated his developing skills behind the plate by picking off all three runners. In 1901 the 6', 185-lb. receiver got his first taste of major-league ball when he joined the National League's Cincinnati Reds. Bergen was Cincinnati's primary catcher as a rookie and again in 1902, but his batting averages of .179 and .180 convinced the Reds to give utility man Heinie Peitz the lion's share of the starts behind the plate in 1903. Appearing in just 58 games, Bergen batted .227 that year, the only time in his 11-year career that he hit for an average higher than .190. Despite his banner season with the bat, the Reds sold him to Brooklyn in February 1904.

                              The Superbas already had a backstop named Lew "Old Dog" Ritter, and for several seasons he and Bergen shared Brooklyn's catching duties. Despite playing part-time, Bergen earned a reputation for the strongest throwing arm in the National League, so strong that his mere presence behind the plate was enough to intimidate base runners. Notes in newspapers of the day often remarked on his lightning release and ability to throw to second base on a line while standing flatfooted.

                              On August 23, 1909, Bergen gunned down six St. Louis Cardinals attempting to steal (for years it was reported that he threw out seven on that date, but recent research confirmed that the number was six). Despite catching only 941 games, Bergen ranks in the Top 20 for career assists by a catcher. And while only five of the 13 catchers in the Hall of Fame ever amassed as many as 100 assists in a single season, Bergen accomplished that feat in nine of his 11 major- league campaigns, failing only in 1903 and 1907, the two seasons he caught fewer than 60 games. He reached a high of 202 assists in 1909, making him one of only a handful of backstops ever to accumulate more than 200 in a season. And it wasn't just in throwing that Bergen excelled. His lifetime fielding average exceeded the league average for catchers, .972 vs. .969, and he caught two no-hitters.

                              Bergen's offense, however, was another story. Though it hardly seems possible, his batting actually got worse as the years went on. In 1909 he batted .139, the lowest post-1900 mark ever for a batting-title qualifier. That year Bergen also managed to put together the longest hitless streak in major-league history. After singling in his first at-bat on June 29, 1909, he went 46 at-bats before singling again in his second trip to the plate in the second game of a doubleheader on July 17. The streak breaker, appropriately, was of the infield variety. According to statistical evidence, Bergen's defensive skills were still adequate in 1911 when he compiled an NL-leading .981 fielding average. His pitiful offensive skills sank to a new low, however, even for him--a .132 batting average and just 10 RBI in 227 at-bats. With promising young catcher Otto Miller now on the Brooklyn roster, Bergen was released at the close of the season.

                              At age 33, Bill Bergen still had an affinity for the game. He played in the International League in 1912-13, first for Newark and later for Baltimore. Despite failing health, Bergen continued to play for Scranton of the New York State League in 1914, but his offensive numbers began to mirror his major-league production: a .161 batting average in 298 at-bats. He hung on as an active player through 1917, but by 1919 his health was limiting him to managing semipro teams in the vicinity of his home in Worcester, Massachusetts, where he had settled in 1903, the same year he wed Alice Moran.

                              By 1930 Bergen's baseball days were over, his activities reduced by a worsening heart condition. Little is known of the last years of his life, but on December 6, 1943, his condition necessitated admission to Worcester City Hospital. Thirteen days later he succumbed; the official cause of death was arteriosclerotic heart disease. His widow, Alice, survived him, as did two sisters, Margaret McAvoy and Katherine Drumgoll. There was no mention of any children in numerous obituaries. After a requiem high mass in St. Paul's Church, Bill Bergen's once rifle-like throwing arm was put to final rest in St. John's Cemetery in Worcester.

                              Sabr Article.

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