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Joe Jackson Thread

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  • Honus Wagner Rules
    replied
    Originally posted by White Knight
    Quite a few illiterate people can sign their own name. It's really only one pattern, so I would assume they have someone sign their name and then they memorize it.
    I've also read that Jackson's wife would sometimes sign Joe's name on documents. Any truth to this? The baseball for auction was from 1919 so I was wondering if Jackson had learned to sign his name by then? Didn't he sign a confession with an 'X'?

    http://www.psacard.com/autographfact...21/joe-jackson

    Leave a comment:


  • Herr28
    replied
    Yeah, my 3-year-old son can't read more than a few words, but he can spell and write his first and last name(s).

    Leave a comment:


  • Honus Wagner Rules
    replied
    There is a signed baseball signed by some of the 1919 White Sox players, including Joe Jackson, up for auction. I thought Jackson was illiterate?

    http://espn.go.com/chicago/mlb/story...ilia-auctioned

    Leave a comment:


  • bluesky5
    replied
    Joe's great, great, great nephew was drafted with the 160th pick by the Texas Rangers. He is also named Joe Jackson and is from Greenville, SC just like Joe.

    http://espn.go.com/blog/playbook/fan...at-the-citadel

    Leave a comment:


  • Dude Paskert
    replied
    Originally posted by CTaka View Post
    If Jackson was claiming that is an all-time record, it wouldn't have even been a record at that time. Honus Wagner threw for a then record 403 feet in the field day competition in 1898, a record that stood until 1908.

    Nevertheless, this would imply that Jackson did have a strong throwing arm. While much of the discussion about Shoeless (rightly) focuses on his hitting, I am curious about his "other tools". What do we know about his baserunning speed/skill and fielding ability?
    Glen Gorbous' record throw was about 446 feet, and there is a story about Steve Dalkowski (who knows if you can believe ANYTHING said about him) that he threw a ball from CF fence 440 feet from home and the ball went over the stands behind the plate. I guess there are supposed to be some parks around the country where holes Dalko made in welded wire fending with wild pitches are still preserved, but I can't say that I've seen any real photos.
    But, Jackson was reputed to have a great arm in his day, with good accuracy. He played against adults when he was a youngster and they learned to not try to take the extra base against the kid. Can't remember ever seeing that he had really good speed, though.

    Leave a comment:


  • CTaka
    replied
    Originally posted by Blackout View Post
    yes it says in "Ty and the Babe" that Joe Jackson threw a ball 390 feet

    which is longer than a football field!
    If Jackson was claiming that is an all-time record, it wouldn't have even been a record at that time. Honus Wagner threw for a then record 403 feet in the field day competition in 1898, a record that stood until 1908.

    Nevertheless, this would imply that Jackson did have a strong throwing arm. While much of the discussion about Shoeless (rightly) focuses on his hitting, I am curious about his "other tools". What do we know about his baserunning speed/skill and fielding ability?

    Leave a comment:


  • Blackout
    replied
    Originally posted by Corgidog1 View Post
    In looking at Joe jackson's stats I noticed that in 1917 his avg. dropped to 301 despite playing in 146 games. Any ideas what on what happene?. I also noted that in a 1949 interview with Sports Magazine in reflecting upon his career one of the achievments Joe noted was that he held the all time throwing record for distance. Anyone know anything about this?
    yes it says in "Ty and the Babe" that Joe Jackson threw a ball 390 feet

    which is longer than a football field!

    Leave a comment:


  • Blackout
    replied
    joe jackson > mike trout

    Leave a comment:


  • Corgidog1
    replied
    In looking at Joe jackson's stats I noticed that in 1917 his avg. dropped to 301 despite playing in 146 games. Any ideas what on what happene?. I also noted that in a 1949 interview with Sports Magazine in reflecting upon his career one of the achievments Joe noted was that he held the all time throwing record for distance. Anyone know anything about this?

    Leave a comment:


  • bluesky5
    replied
    Jackson may have a case for best first and last season in a single career.

    Leave a comment:


  • bluesky5
    replied
    Joe getting hitched. Article follows courtesy of the Greenville News via blackbetsy.com

    joe-katie-wedding-day-large.jpg

    Joe Jackson, The popular center fielder of the local team
    made the greatest home run of his career on Sunday. The
    home run was made on Cupid's diamond and the victory was a
    fair young lady. On Sunday afternoon at 4:30 o'clock Joe was
    married to Miss Kate Wynn, The Rev. W.B. Justis Officiating.
    The happy couple have the best wishes of all fandom.
    Last edited by bluesky5; 12-28-2012, 08:08 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • bluesky5
    replied
    I particularly like pictures of Jackson with the Athletics.

    1909jjathletics1.jpg

    Joe is on the viewers right.

    phillyjoe.jpg

    Joe is fourth from the left in the third row.

    ateam.jpg
    Last edited by bluesky5; 12-28-2012, 05:53 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • westsidegrounds
    replied
    Originally posted by Honus Wagner Rules View Post
    It's been established for years that Joe Jackson was "illiterate". Why he completely illiterate or functionally illiterate?
    According to the SABR biography by David Fleitz, Joe started work at the Brandon Mill textile factory at 6 or 7 years of age and never attended school.

    Leave a comment:


  • bluesky5
    replied
    Joe Jackson page on http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg...e=gr&GRid=1743

    jacksonjoseph.jpg

    jacksonjoseph2.jpg

    Leave a comment:


  • Nimrod
    replied
    Joe`s final home and where he died in his sleep on December 5,1951.Now a museum.117894[/ATTACH]
    Attached Files

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