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  • Biggest Drop Off's

    Who were the biggest drop offs from one season to the next? I would have Hack Wilson ranked up there going from 56 HR 191 RBIs 208 hits .356/.454/.723 in 1930 To 13 HR 61 RBIs 103 hits .261/.362/.435 in 1931. But he did play in less games that year. So who do you think had the biggest drop off season.
    go sox.

    Pigskin-Fever

  • #2
    Originally posted by RedSoxVT92
    Who were the biggest drop offs from one season to the next? I would have Hack Wilson ranked up there going from 56 HR 191 RBIs 208 hits .356/.454/.723 in 1930 To 13 HR 61 RBIs 103 hits .261/.362/.435 in 1931. But he did play in less games that year. So who do you think had the biggest drop off season.
    Norm cash. He was Mickey Mantle for one season, and never came close to approaching those numbers again.

    I guess corkedbats help more than people originally thought...

    Comment


    • #3
      Don't be so sure about Cash. It's not so clear he actually even used a corked bat.

      Reggie Jackson 1982 to 1983, Mike Lowell 2004 to 2005.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by 538280
        Don't be so sure about Cash. It's not so clear he actually even used a corked bat.
        Uh, he admitted to corking his bat.


        By his own account, Tigers first baseman Norm Cash used a corked bat during the 1961 season, a breakout year he never came close to duplicating. In '61, Cash led the AL in batting with a .361 average, hit 41 homers and drove in 132 runs. After he retired, he demonstrated for Sports Illustrated how he doctored his bat by drilling an eight-inch hole in the barrel, filling it with glue, cork and sawdust.

        http://espn.go.com/mlb/s/2003/0603/1562807.html
        Last edited by Gino Guacamoolie; 03-28-2006, 01:51 PM.

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        • #5
          Barry Bonds 2004 to 2005.
          Buck O'Neil: The Monarch of Baseball

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Gino Guacamoolie

            Uh, he admitted to corking his bat.


            By his own account, Tigers first baseman Norm Cash used a corked bat during the 1961 season, a breakout year he never came close to duplicating. In '61, Cash led the AL in batting with a .361 average, hit 41 homers and drove in 132 runs. After he retired, he demonstrated for Sports Illustrated how he doctored his bat by drilling an eight-inch hole in the barrel, filling it with glue, cork and sawdust.

            http://espn.go.com/mlb/s/2003/0603/1562807.html
            Cash was a joking type personaility, and he wasn't necessarily serious when he said that. Even so, he still was a very good player in '62 and really doesn't deserve any mention in this thread.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by 538280
              Cash was a joking type personaility, and he wasn't necessarily serious when he said that. .
              Yeah sure he was, and canseco was joking when he said he abused steroids.

              Originally posted by 538280
              Even so, he still was a very good player in '62 and really doesn't deserve any mention in this thread.
              Yeah he was good in 62, but nowhere near the level he was in 61.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by KCGHOST
                Barry Bonds 2004 to 2005.
                Funny.
                Fidrych?
                Mythical SF Chronicle scouting report: "That Jeff runs like a deer. Unfortunately, he also hits AND throws like one." I am Venus DeMilo - NO ARM! I can play like a big leaguer, I can field like Luzinski, run like Lombardi. The secret to managing is keeping the ones who hate you away from the undecided ones. I am a triumph of quantity over quality. I'm almost useful, every village needs an idiot.
                Good traders: MadHatter(2), BoofBonser26, StormSurge

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by RedSoxVT92
                  Who were the biggest drop offs from one season to the next? I would have Hack Wilson ranked up there going from 56 HR 191 RBIs 208 hits .356/.454/.723 in 1930 To 13 HR 61 RBIs 103 hits .261/.362/.435 in 1931. But he did play in less games that year. So who do you think had the biggest drop off season.
                  Billy Grabarkowitz
                  Davey Johnson
                  Larry Sheets
                  Gene Bearden
                  Last edited by RuthMayBond; 03-28-2006, 02:04 PM.
                  Mythical SF Chronicle scouting report: "That Jeff runs like a deer. Unfortunately, he also hits AND throws like one." I am Venus DeMilo - NO ARM! I can play like a big leaguer, I can field like Luzinski, run like Lombardi. The secret to managing is keeping the ones who hate you away from the undecided ones. I am a triumph of quantity over quality. I'm almost useful, every village needs an idiot.
                  Good traders: MadHatter(2), BoofBonser26, StormSurge

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by 538280
                    Reggie Jackson 1982 to 1983,
                    I've always like Jackson's 1983 drop, but George Scott's transition from 1967 to 1968 was even worse. He went from a .303 / 139 OPS+ hitter in 1967 to a nothing. In 1968, Scott hit only 3 HRs, batted .171, and let his OPS+ fall 99 points to 40!
                    Last edited by dgarza; 04-03-2006, 12:34 PM.

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                    • #11
                      Jason Schmidt 2004-2005.
                      AL East Champions: 1981 1982
                      AL Pennant: 1982
                      NL Central Champions: 2011
                      NL Wild Card: 2008

                      "It was like coming this close to your dreams and then watching them brush past you like a stranger in a crowd. At the time you don't think much of it; you know, we just don't recognize the significant moments of our lives while they're happening. Back then I thought, 'Well, there'll be other days.' I didn't realize that that was the only day." - Moonlight Graham

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                      • #12
                        Mike Lowell certainly comes to mind as a very recent example.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Chris Davis
                          2013: .286/.370/.634, 53 HR, 138 RBI
                          2014: .196/.300/.404, 26 HR, 72 RBI
                          My top 10 players:

                          1. Babe Ruth
                          2. Barry Bonds
                          3. Ty Cobb
                          4. Ted Williams
                          5. Willie Mays
                          6. Alex Rodriguez
                          7. Hank Aaron
                          8. Honus Wagner
                          9. Lou Gehrig
                          10. Mickey Mantle

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by GiambiJuice View Post
                            Chris Davis
                            2013: .286/.370/.634, 53 HR, 138 RBI
                            2014: .196/.300/.404, 26 HR, 72 RBI
                            It was obvious that Davis was due for a major crash, though a .196 BA is a bit extreme. But hitters that strikeout 199 times in a season can't really sustain a high BA for long.
                            Strikeouts are boring! Besides that, they're fascist. Throw some ground balls - it's more democratic.-Crash Davis

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                            • #15
                              Chuck Knoblauch , defensively

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