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If Gehrig Lived......

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  • #46
    Originally posted by Elvis9045
    Wrong. He was 2 years younger than Clark Gable was for example. Gable (as did many Hollywood stars) enlisted and served in the North African theatre in the army tank corp. I seriously doubt Gehrig would've been 4-F.
    Gable wasn't in the tank corps. I seriously doubt that there were any over 40 year old recruits on the ground in North Africa. Unless Gehrig was in the army to play baseball, I don't think he would have been tken into the military services.

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    • #47
      Originally posted by blackout805
      I'll predict a .334 career BA, 600 homers, 2300+ RBIs

      and all those rings
      Originally posted by BoSox Rule
      Tell me if this prediction ever comes true.
      Originally posted by 538280
      I find this to be a rather useless exercise in evaluating Lou Gehrig, but yeah, there's a very good chance he would have become the all time leader in RBI if not for the disease. Of course, to me that would mean nothing.
      Nice underhanded insult, Bosox.

      You two are real tried-and-true baseball historians, you know that? God forbid you should ever have to think abstractly or in the subjunctive. That would indeed be a daunting task.
      Last edited by Bill Burgess; 04-02-2006, 01:06 PM.

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      • #48
        Originally posted by wamby
        I don't know if the disease is genetic or not, but the fact that Gehrig's parents didn't have it would not rule it out as being genetic.
        My grandfather died of ALS in 1995, and we were told that there are three strains, two heritable and one not. Luckily for us, his was the variation that is not genetically passed down.
        Last edited by csh19792001; 04-02-2006, 01:01 PM.

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        • #49
          Als

          The average age of onset is 55 however, 80% of cases begin between the ages of 40 and 70 years.

          There are three different types of ALS. The first type of ALS is sporadic ALS (SALS) and accounts for 90% of the ALS cases that have been diagnosed. The second type is termed familial ALS (FALS) while the third type is called Guamian because it is found at a high incidence among people from Guam. These last two types of ALS are heritable and account for 10% of all ALS cases.

          However, cases of the disease do occur in persons in their twenties and thirties. Generally though, ALS occurs in greater percentages as men and women grow older. ALS is 20% more common in men than in women. However with increasing age, the incidence of ALS is more equal between men and women.

          There are several research studies – past and present – investigating possible risk factors that may be associate with ALS. More work is needed to conclusively determine what genetics and/or environment factors contribute to developing ALS.

          Half of all people affected with ALS live at least three or more years after diagnosis. Twenty percent live five years or more; up to ten percent will live more than ten years.

          Approximately 35,000 people at any given time are living with ALS in the United States or six to eight people per 100,000 population (prevalence). The incidence of ALS is close to that of multiple sclerosis and four times that of muscular dystrophy.

          Wamby:
          Here's the answer to your question about heritability:
          http://www.alsa.org/als/genetics.cfm...TOKEN=55281284

          Other Sources/Resources:
          http://www.alsphiladelphia.org/penns...r_spring04.htm

          http://www.alsa.org/

          http://www.lesturnerals.org/whatisals.htm

          http://www.molbio.princeton.edu/cour...s/07/what.html

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          • #50
            Originally posted by 538280
            I find this to be a rather useless exercise in evaluating Lou Gehrig, but yeah, there's a very good chance he would have become the all time leader in RBI if not for the disease. Of course, to me that would mean nothing.
            Isn't this similar to subjective evaluations that you have made regarding Oscar Charleston?

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            • #51
              Originally posted by bkmckenna
              my belief is that he would have played until he retired, raised money for war bonds, attended babe's funeral, become a movie personality starring as a quiet western hero in a bunch of audie murphy films, stopped by the yankee clubhouse every now and again until stengel chucked him out, sat at home mesmerized by the boob tube, have a few beers and kiss his wife and kids good night
              well, so much for the formerly awesome physique. h but hey, it gets the best of us. he could have ended up looking like the Bambino for all we know
              Johnny
              Delusion, Life's Coping Mechanism

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              • #52
                Originally posted by wamby
                Gable wasn't in the tank corps. I seriously doubt that there were any over 40 year old recruits on the ground in North Africa. Unless Gehrig was in the army to play baseball, I don't think he would have been tken into the military services.
                My bad. He was in the Army Air Corps. He didn't spend his time in the service making movies, although he did volunteer for several non-combat B-17 missions over Germany in prep for the Memphis Belle documentary. Henry Fonda, also pushing 40, served full Naval combat duty in the Pacific theatre. Anyway, the whole point is that Gehrig wasn't too old to serve if he wanted to, which I still think he would've. Whether or not he was physically fit no one will ever know.

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                • #53
                  Like Babe, Lou was German. His parents were born in the old country and spoke German fluently at home. When Lou married Eleanor, she took him to Wagnerian operas, and he loved them so much he bought the librettos. They'd go backstage to compliment their favorite soprano, (and mine) Kirsten Flagstad.

                  If Lou had to actually fight Germans in WWII, I think he would have been profoundly sad. Even knowing his good countrymen had been misled by a misguided political leader.

                  Bill
                  Last edited by Bill Burgess; 04-03-2006, 04:20 PM.

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                  • #54
                    Originally posted by [email protected]
                    If Lou had to actually fight Germans in WWII, I think he would have been profoundly sad. Even knowing his good countrymen had been misled by a misguided political leader.
                    Bill
                    Bill, I think "misguided" is the most polite and euphemized adjective that one could possibly conceive regarding Adolf Hitler.

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                    • #55
                      Before the war the German Reich was fairly well supported in German neighborhoods in New York. The Bund had some well attended rallies at Madison Square Garden in the late 1930s. The Nazi's virulent anti-Communism was seen as a plus. I would guess that more than a few Americans' of that era also agreed with their anti-Semitic policies also.

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                      • #56
                        Originally posted by csh19792001
                        Bill, I think "misguided" is the most polite and euphemized adjective that one could possibly conceive regarding Adolf Hitler.
                        Isn't it refreshing to hear a civil presentation for a change. Honestly, I assume everyone knows that gentleman's colors/agenda. No need to state the obvious, I think. Alright. He stinks.

                        Bill

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                        • #57
                          Originally posted by wamby
                          Before the war the German Reich was fairly well supported in German neighborhoods in New York. The Bund had some well attended rallies at Madison Square Garden in the late 1930s. The Nazi's virulent anti-Communism was seen as a plus. I would guess that more than a few Americans' of that era also agreed with their anti-Semitic policies also.
                          Back when, the ultra-nationalists used comunism as the unifying bogeyman. Today, it's 'terrorists'. What would they do without their unifying BS? The 'Emporer' has no clothes. No excuse to deny us our hard-won rights to fight the 'bad guys'. Patriot Act GOTTA GO!!
                          Last edited by Bill Burgess; 04-03-2006, 02:37 PM.

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                          • #58
                            Gehrig detested Hitler in the 1930s. He would have, most probably, have done what he could for the USA, just like most German Americans, including a fellow named Eisenhower. Were Dimaggio or Crosetti upset that we fought Mussolini? Brownie31

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                            • #59
                              Thanks, Brownie. I like that. Makes me feel better.

                              BB

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                              • #60
                                Even if good Americans fight wars against others, isn't it still OK to feel bad that one must kill good Germans, Italians, Japanese, etc. Just because they were taken over & misled by bad people, it still is alright to grieve for having to kill good people.

                                Even if the smart ones saw through the bad leaders, if they were drafted, they had to serve, or else. Just like our brave kids, been ordered to invade, conquer, occupy and now kill/control good foreigners. Killing must feel bad no matter what the circumstances. I pray to the Lord I'll never have to kill, not even a burglar.

                                Bill

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