Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

*Babe Ruth Thread*

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • As of the date of this article (1969), it stated no one had be paid in inflation adjusted dollars more than Ruth's 80,000 in 1930

    in 1977, 80,000 in 1930 dollars was worth about 300,000

    I wonder if Reggie Jackson was the first to exceed Ruth's comparative earnings; I recall his FA contract with the Yankees being for 500.000 per annum

    Comment


    • amend that

      I'm sure Hunter's contract in 1974 would have broken that ground

      Comment


      • Could babe hit the breaking ball?

        Comment


        • Of course not.

          Luckily he always got to face a bright white, unscuffed ball that came in straight and true, at 80 MPH.

          :innocent:

          Comment


          • Originally posted by Sultan_1895-1948 View Post
            Of course not.

            Luckily he always got to face a bright white, unscuffed ball that came in straight and true, at 80 MPH.

            :innocent:
            Come on man lol. I know you're better than that.

            Comment


            • Originally posted by George H Ruth View Post
              Could babe hit the breaking ball?
              Hornsby didn't think he could. Twice as manager of the Cards in the World Series, in St. Louis, he went to the mound to instruct pitcher Flint Rhem, how to pitch to Babe, nothing but slow stuff. Home run to deep RCF.

              Next at bat, again Hornsby to the mound. Rhem, "Hornsby gives me same instructions,same thing, nothing but slow stuff, he was just lucky the first time." Another home run, over thr pavillion, across Grand Avenue and breaking a Cheverolet showroom window.

              Don't know if Hornsby gave reliever Heman Bell any instructions. Ruth hit number three off of him, dead center, a couple of hops in the bleachers, bounces into the street, ends up in front of the YMCA Building.

              I have to laugh when I see comments ( not you) that Babe had trouble with breaking balls or slow stuff. Wouldn't they have figured that out over 22 years, throw more of those pitches, nonsense.
              Last edited by SHOELESSJOE3; 10-06-2013, 03:26 PM.

              Comment


              • Another WS home run1932. Charlie Root comments, the second home run was hit off a slow pitch.
                Attached Files

                Comment


                • Oh were you being serious?

                  The short answer is that he had no weakness. The same could be said for other hitters. But with Ruth, pitchers and managers lost sleep over how to approach him. He was the most dangerous kind of puzzle to solve because of the damage he could do. If something worked once, it usually didn't work a second time, and vary rarely a third. This site is littered with examples of him crushing curves and spitball pitches.

                  If you haven't already read these two articles, they're worth looking at.

                  http://www.baseball-fever.com/showth...16#post2125016

                  Ray Schalk, doubtless the wisest catcher in the game, discussed this question, some years ago. “What is the best way to fool Babe?” he said. “Frankly, I refuse to answer that question. It isn't because I have trade secrets that I dislike to disclose. I only wish I had. I've discussed Babe's case with all my pitchers and most of my teammates. But after a lot of scheming and studying, I've come to the rather hopeless conclusion that there isn't any way to fool Babe. And I'll go on record now with the statement that there is absolutely no rule or set of rules which can be laid down as a guide for pitching to Babe Ruth.

                  “Here are a few conclusions that careful observers have come to, and I can give them for what they're worth. First, Babe is supposed to like speed pitching better than slow ball pitching. Second, he is supposed to like a low ball better than a high ball. Third, at Comiskey Field, at least, it's considered dangerous to put the ball on the inside to Ruth.

                  "What do these conclusion amount to? There's some reason for all three. You may say that sluggers in general dislike slow balls. You may note that Ruth hits under the ball, which would suggest that he likes low balls. It's quite obvious that Ruth pulls the ball. Hence, you can reason that it's inadvisable to put the ball inside for him. So far so good. Ruth may dislike a slow ball, but when he broke his old home run record of twenty-nine, it was off a slow ball from Dicky Kerr. He may dislike a high ball, but I saw him drive a high ball over the outfield fence in Chicago and that's a drive you don’t see every day. It may be unwise to keep the ball inside, but what are you going to do with it? I saw him pull a ball at least a foot outside into the right field bleachers.

                  “Laying down rules on how to pitch to Babe is like rigging up a scheme to beat the races. Many an enterprising plunger has done this with some success for a while. But if he played his system consistently, he some day found himself walking home because he lacked carfare.”

                  http://www.baseball-fever.com/showth...15#post2125015

                  Urban Shocker

                  "Whey do I like to pitch to Babe? Because he is a never-ending puzzle. You always have to extend yourself to the utmost when you face Babe. Sometimes he looks very easy, but there is one thing it is never safe for a pitcher to bank on. Any time he figures that he has Babe’s number he is feeding himself a liberal dose of misplaced confidence."

                  "Babe is a hitter who cannot be fooled very long with anything you give him. He isn’t supposed to like slow curves, but if you keep on feeding him slow curves, sooner or later you will find a ball coming back at you in a straight line off Babe’s bat and there won’t be anything slow about his motion either."

                  Comment


                  • On another forum, a 1969 SN article stated that as of 1969, no player had yet exceed Ruth's 1930 80,000 salary in inflation adjusted dollars

                    my guessing is that Catfish Hunter's 750,000 per annum contract 75-79 would have been the first to break that barrier

                    Early 70's inflation adjustment was about 3.5 over 1930

                    Comment


                    • No telling what he made in some years or his lifetime.
                      Just a few articles, 1921, signed with F."Kieth Promotions to do a stage act.
                      A 20 week stint at 3000.00 per week, do the math, 60,000.00 off the playing field.

                      In 1926 he signed on with Pantages to do a 12 week vaudeville act, 100,000.00.
                      This was the highest paid fee for a single vaudeville act in 1926.
                      Think about that, a baseball player being paid more for a stage act than the biggest names in the vaudeville world. And he has no act, just be himself, banter with the crowd.
                      From his early days in Boston, offered all kinds of deals for endorsments.
                      A locker full of checks sent to him from potential sponsors.
                      Some of the checks for a couple of dollars sent to him from people off the street.
                      Why would they send Babe a check. Because when they received the cancelled check, they had his autograph.

                      I don't care how much we read about him, there is no way, short of being there at that time to realize his popularity at that time.

                      Comment


                      • Even in later years, drawing a crowd. I don't think it was Joe McCarthy as manager but Bob Shawkey managing for one year 1930.
                        Depending on how crowded the train was, at times Babe did not eat in the same dining car as the team, passengers would constently walk though the car to get a look at Ruth.
                        Shawkey said no exceptions, the whole team dines in the same car.
                        Did not last long, Ruth being in that dining car, causing a commotion, passengers back, filing through the car to catch a glimpse or hello from Babe.
                        The order from Shawkey no longer stood, it was left up to the babe, dine with the team or dine alone.

                        Comment


                        • Originally posted by SHOELESSJOE3 View Post

                          I don't care how much we read about him, there is no way, short of being there at that time to realize his popularity at that time.
                          This is something I've been trying to convey for years at this site. It's usually met with the typical and expected "hero worship" retort. Nonsense. If you've studied and read about him in depth, it gives you a whole new perspective.

                          It is extremely hard to do, given how watered down with technology and video game baseball numbers being put up, but putting yourself into a 1920 mindset does wonders. It wasn't just on the field, doing things nobody had ever thought possible. It was a man who saw no distinction between classes and treated everyone the same. Nobody was ever more himself, in all situations, than Ruth, and nobody ever understood and accepted his position as idol more than Ruth.

                          Comment


                          • A question for the Ruth experts. Did the Babe ever give an extensive interview, either in print or radio, where he talked about his life? I don't mean a fluff piece but a real honest and detailed account of his life?
                            Last edited by Honus Wagner Rules; 10-08-2013, 09:23 PM.
                            Strikeouts are boring! Besides that, they're fascist. Throw some ground balls - it's more democratic.-Crash Davis

                            Comment


                            • Originally posted by Honus Wagner Rules View Post
                              A question for the Ruth experts. Did the Babe ever give an extensive interview, either in print or radio, where he talked about his life? I don't mean a fluff piece but a real honest ans detailed account of his life?
                              Jesus Honus, we hardly have a paragraph on him talking about hitting, let alone his life.

                              Did you have any questions in particular?

                              Comment


                              • Originally posted by Sultan_1895-1948 View Post
                                Jesus Honus, we hardly have a paragraph on him talking about hitting, let alone his life.

                                Did you have any questions in particular?
                                I really don't have a particular question in mind. I just wanted to see if I could get a better feel for Ruth's personality in real life when he's not hamming it up for the fans. There's that one film with the orphans where Ruth teaches one kid how to hit where it seems he is just being himself. But I have nothing else really to compare it.
                                Strikeouts are boring! Besides that, they're fascist. Throw some ground balls - it's more democratic.-Crash Davis

                                Comment

                                Ad Widget

                                Collapse
                                Working...
                                X