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*Babe Ruth Thread*

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  • Originally posted by SHOELESSJOE3 View Post
    With all respect due to Creamers "Babe" book, my take, Smelser's is the best, the most complete, wait till you read it.
    I've read Creamer's book. I thought it was well done except for two minor quibbles.

    1) Hardly any mention of Ruth's relation and feud with Lou Gehrig.

    2) The book ended abruptly right at Ruth's death. I was surprised that Creamer didn't write about how the nation reacted to Ruth's death.
    Last edited by Honus Wagner Rules; 12-09-2013, 12:46 PM.
    Strikeouts are boring! Besides that, they're fascist. Throw some ground balls - it's more democratic.-Crash Davis

    Comment


    • Originally posted by bluesky5 View Post
      I just think the fact that most 21 year old girls can say "Babe Ruth played baseball." is pretty amazing. I don't think I know a single person who doesn't know that.
      My wife and my mother have never heard of Babe Ruth.
      Strikeouts are boring! Besides that, they're fascist. Throw some ground balls - it's more democratic.-Crash Davis

      Comment


      • Originally posted by Honus Wagner Rules View Post
        My wife and my mother have never heard of Babe Ruth.
        Don't believe it.
        "No matter how great you were once upon a time — the years go by, and men forget,” - W. A. Phelon in Baseball Magazine in 1915. “Ross Barnes, forty years ago, was as great as Cobb or Wagner ever dared to be. Had scores been kept then as now, he would have seemed incomparably marvelous.”

        Comment


        • Originally posted by bluesky5 View Post
          Don't believe it.
          Are you calling my wife and mother liars?!!! :headbeat:
          Strikeouts are boring! Besides that, they're fascist. Throw some ground balls - it's more democratic.-Crash Davis

          Comment


          • Originally posted by Honus Wagner Rules View Post
            Are you calling my wife and mother liars?!!! :headbeat:
            Lol :noevil:
            "No matter how great you were once upon a time — the years go by, and men forget,” - W. A. Phelon in Baseball Magazine in 1915. “Ross Barnes, forty years ago, was as great as Cobb or Wagner ever dared to be. Had scores been kept then as now, he would have seemed incomparably marvelous.”

            Comment


            • Originally posted by bluesky5 View Post
              Lol :noevil:
              Don't make me go all "Rube Wadell on a bender" on you!
              Strikeouts are boring! Besides that, they're fascist. Throw some ground balls - it's more democratic.-Crash Davis

              Comment


              • Originally posted by Honus Wagner Rules View Post
                Don't make me go all "Rube Wadell on a bender" on you!
                I'm sure it'll be forgiven 80 years later by a famed sabermetrician.
                "No matter how great you were once upon a time — the years go by, and men forget,” - W. A. Phelon in Baseball Magazine in 1915. “Ross Barnes, forty years ago, was as great as Cobb or Wagner ever dared to be. Had scores been kept then as now, he would have seemed incomparably marvelous.”

                Comment


                • Originally posted by Honus Wagner Rules View Post
                  I've read Creamer's book. I thought it was well done except for two minor quibbles.

                  1) Hardly any mention of Ruth's relation and feud with Lou Gehrig.

                  2) The book ended abruptly right at Ruth dead. I was surprise d that Creamer didn't write about how the nation reacted to Ruth's death.
                  Smelser's book far more detailed than Creamer's.
                  Smelser's, words on the bats Babe used more detail, opponents and others opinions on Babe, not just his hitting, also his pitching. Some stats.
                  Too much to even list here. Creamer a story about Babe.
                  Smelser a story about Ruth loaded with way more details than Creamer's.

                  Comment


                  • Originally posted by Sultan_1895-1948
                    Yeah hard to believe, unless they've been living under a rock.

                    Making deliveries today I decided do a casual survey. These are the only people I asked. If I do five a day there will be some long list LOL. Simply asked if they knew who Babe Ruth is, and what could they tell me about him. Documented in phone notepad app.

                    Asian girl in late 20s - "Yeah he was a baseball player" she said. When asked if she knew what team he played for, she said The Red Sox but couldn't name the Yankees. Kinda strange.

                    Man in his 50s, from Palestine. Said Babe Ruth was a baseball player but could not tell me who he played for.

                    White man in his 60s. Knew Babe Ruth was a baseball player but could not tell me who he played for. Said he's never been a baseball fan.

                    Man in his 30s from the Philippines. He knew Babe Ruth was a baseball player and said he had some kind of record, and knew he played for the Yankees.

                    White man in his 40s. Knew Babe Ruth was a baseball player for the Yankees in the 20s and 30s, mentioned his home run record, partier, liked to drink and smoke.
                    Yet, it is still true though.
                    Strikeouts are boring! Besides that, they're fascist. Throw some ground balls - it's more democratic.-Crash Davis

                    Comment


                    • Originally posted by Sultan_1895-1948
                      I believe ya bud.
                      Strikeouts are boring! Besides that, they're fascist. Throw some ground balls - it's more democratic.-Crash Davis

                      Comment


                      • I think two factors that led to Ruth having unnatural batting power can be discerned in photographs. One is that he was in a sense taller than he appeared. By that I mean the portion of his body that contributed physically to his swing, from the shoulders to the feet, was actually longer than that of the average 6'2'' man, due to Ruth's short neck and the way his head jutted out rather than up. Look at the photo below and you can see what I mean. When you look at Ruth in images, observe how high his shoulders are relative to those of the men around him. Ruth had the body of a man 6'3'' or taller, except for the neck.


                        Babe Ruth as a Brave with Worcester Mayor John Mahoney




                        The other factor that gave Babe an advantage was his enormous hands. They allowed him more control over the bat, and allowed for a greater transfer of the torque the rest of his body was creating to the bat head.








                        Here's a photo showing Ruth saying goodbye to his first wife and his daughter (Penn Station in New York, date stamp Feb 19) as he headed off for spring training in 1923, on his way to having the greatest season a position player ever had, according to Baseball Reference:




                        Nice one of The Babe on the road (chewing gum on the cap again):




                        Incredible stat: Jimmie Foxx had his career-best season in 1932 (702 PA, .469 OBP, .749 slugging). Jimmie's 1932 OPS+ was 207. Ruth's career OPS+ (including batting exclusively as a pitcher for the first 3.5 years of his career) was 206. That's over 10,622 PA.

                        You'd prefer wRC+, from FanGraphs? Foxx in 1932: 198. Ruth's career value: 197.
                        Last edited by SultanOfWhat; 12-17-2013, 07:04 PM.
                        sigpic

                        Comment


                        • Originally posted by SultanOfWhat View Post
                          I think two factors that led to Ruth having unnatural batting power can be discerned in photographs. One is that he was in a sense taller than he appeared. By that I mean the portion of his body that contributed physically to his swing, from the shoulders to the feet, was actually longer than that of the average 6'2'' man, due to Ruth's short neck and the way his head jutted out rather than up. Look at the photo below and you can see what I mean. When you look at Ruth in images, observe how high his shoulders are relative to those of the men around him. Ruth had the body of a man 6'3'' or taller, except for the neck.


                          Babe Ruth as a Brave with Worcester Mayor John Mahoney




                          The other factor that gave Babe an advantage was his enormous hands. They allowed him more control over the bat, and allowed for a greater transfer of the torque the rest of his body was creating to the bat head.








                          Here's a photo showing Ruth saying goodbye to his first wife and his daughter (Penn Station in New York, date stamp Feb 19) as he headed off for spring training in 1923, on his way to having the greatest season a position player ever had, according to Baseball Reference:




                          Nice one of The Babe on the road (chewing gum on the cap again):




                          Incredible stat: Jimmie Foxx had his career-best season in 1932 (702 PA, .469 OBP, .749 slugging). Jimmie's 1932 OPS+ was 207. Ruth's career OPS+ (including batting exclusively as a pitcher for the first 3.5 years of his career) was 206. That's over 10,622 PA.

                          You'd prefer wRC+, from FanGraphs? Foxx in 1932: 198. Ruth's career value: 197.
                          There was never a slugger that was as consistent as Babe Ruth.

                          Comment


                          • From the Buffalo NY Times, July 19,1931. Babe and Lou tied for the AL lead with 46 home runs.
                            In 1931, Griffith Stadium Lou lined a ball into the centerfield bleachers. The ball bounded back on the field and when the runner on second base Lyn Lary saw the centerfielder
                            with the ball, he thought the ball as caught. Lary rounded third, thinking it was the third out, ran to the dgout. Lou did not see this, ran the bases touched home and was
                            called out, lost home run, lost leading the AL lead.
                            Yes, Lary should have seen what took place. I blame just as much on the third base coach, manager Joe McCarthy was coaching that day, he never coached another game the rest of the season..
                            Attached Files

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                            • Freaking hilarious...

                              Image1.jpg
                              "No matter how great you were once upon a time — the years go by, and men forget,” - W. A. Phelon in Baseball Magazine in 1915. “Ross Barnes, forty years ago, was as great as Cobb or Wagner ever dared to be. Had scores been kept then as now, he would have seemed incomparably marvelous.”

                              Comment


                              • How about this one? :hyper:

                                babe-ruth-santa.jpg
                                Strikeouts are boring! Besides that, they're fascist. Throw some ground balls - it's more democratic.-Crash Davis

                                Comment

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