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*Babe Ruth Thread*

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  • Badge714
    replied
    Originally posted by SHOELESSJOE3 View Post
    I was of the belief that his stance was a factor in his power, long ball hitting.
    Back to Babe in stride to swing..jpg the pitcher and placement of his front foot.

    He was actually "uncoiling" his body from that stance. Add that part to his swing, lots of momentum.
    Along with these two, a favorite photo of Ruth. They convey brutal but controlled power.
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    Last edited by Badge714; 01-05-2018, 07:30 PM.

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  • SHOELESSJOE3
    replied
    Babe header 5.JPG Long before the "head first" slide became more common. The Babe, he was out on this play. against Washington.
    The pitcher, concerned to see if he was OK, thought it might be Walter Johnson, maybe not. babe head first sequence.JPG
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    Last edited by SHOELESSJOE3; 01-05-2018, 01:45 PM.

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  • SHOELESSJOE3
    replied
    I was of the belief that his stance was a factor in his power, long ball hitting.
    Back to Babe in stride to swing..jpg the pitcher and placement of his front foot.

    He was actually "uncoiling" his body from that stance. Add that part to his swing, lots of momentum.

    Leave a comment:


  • SHOELESSJOE3
    replied
    He is every Babe Etch A Sketch.jpgBabe corn maze Sunderland Maine.jpgBabe tortilla.jpg where........................ Second pic, shot from an air plane, a corn field in Maine and even a tortilla. No one like him with the staying power, not even Ali, no one. Ali was great, but he was in our time, Babe has been gone for decades.

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  • SHOELESSJOE3
    replied
    It was said years ago, the greatest event to see in the game, Babe Ruth hitting a home run, second greatest, to see Babe Ruth strike out. BABE STRIKES OUT..JPG

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  • SHOELESSJOE3
    replied
    Babe and fan girl muscle.jpgGIRL POINT SMALL.jpgBabe and more girls......jpgBabe and Lou Gehrig girls tee shirts.jpg They never saw him play, odds are some of their parents saw him play.. Possible their parents w ere not born until after he had passed away......................but they know who he is, still a draw.
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  • Sultan_1895-1948
    replied
    Originally posted by Floyd Gondolli View Post

    And when Ruth watched Joe that first game of his career 7/11/14, it perhaps made and impact of him. Alpng with Jacksons rep and career numbers by that point.

    When Ruth watched Jackson hit for raw power, taking full cuts regardless of the situation with his pinkie off the handle when the rest of the league was place hitting almost exclusively (Including Cobb and Speaker), it probably made an impact.

    When he hit the longest HR in the history of League Park ~460 feet against the Deadball, people noticed.

    When he hit the longest home run in the history of the polo grounds over the right field grandstand in 13' against trick pitcheds and a very dead ball people noticed. It was by far the longest HR in the park until Babe came along.

    Joe Jackson had only 18 home runs at home and 36 on the road. Before they changed the ball in 19' half of his career HR were not hit over the fence. This coming from a guy with the same Relative Isolated Slugging career numbers as 500-600 HR players of later eras.

    He blows away everyone else 1910-1920 in raw/isolated slugging. It's mostly masked by his parks. Ex: he hit twice as many triples at home as on the road. Most if not almost all of those triples would be home runs in the 20s and 30s.
    You acting as if you're teaching me something about either Babe, or Shoeless is humorous.

    It's an absurd notion. Ruth was shattering the established mold long before he ever saw Jackson play. Period.

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  • Sultan_1895-1948
    replied
    This belongs in the "debunking myths" section.

    Ruth was playing 150+ games per year at St. Mary's and crushing baseball's with his own style. Brothers Matthias and Gilbert have attested that Ruth's approach and batting form did not change one bit from before he signed and into his pro days.

    There is no evidence Ruth saw Jackson play prior to seeing him on the same field while they were both professionals. Any testimony or acknowledgement by Ruth towards Jackson is simply a nod of the cap. That doesn't mean he might not have implemented a small thing here or there once having seen him, but the point remains and cannot be stated emphatically enough. RUTH WAS ABSOLUTELY MURDERING BASEBALLS AS A YOUNG TEEN WHO HAD NEVER SEEN JACKSON PLAY.

    This fable belongs in the John Goodman movie. It would have you believe Babe was signed as a pitcher who was a slappy, choke up contact style hitter, who, once having seen Jackson hit, became an amazing power hitter. That is absurd. He was setting distance records in parks before even having signed.

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  • Badge714
    replied
    Originally posted by elmer View Post
    Grantland Rice article titled Greatest Natural Batsman Springfield Daily Republican June 27, 1932.
    Thanks Elmer. Good to finally read the article referenced by so many.

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  • elmer
    replied
    Grantland Rice article titled Greatest Natural Batsman Springfield Daily Republican June 27, 1932.
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  • Floyd Gondolli
    replied
    Originally posted by Sultan_1895-1948 View Post
    Ruth was swinging from the heels and crushing baseballs as a young teen at St Mary's. It is thought that watching Bro Matthias crush high towering fungos had an influence. There is no record of Ruth even seeing Jackson play until he became a pro.
    And when Ruth watched Joe that first game of his career 7/11/14, it perhaps made and impact of him. Alpng with Jacksons rep and career numbers by that point.

    When Ruth watched Jackson hit for raw power, taking full cuts regardless of the situation with his pinkie off the handle when the rest of the league was place hitting almost exclusively (Including Cobb and Speaker), it probably made an impact.

    When he hit the longest HR in the history of League Park ~460 feet against the Deadball, people noticed.

    When he hit the longest home run in the history of the polo grounds over the right field grandstand in 13' against trick pitcheds and a very dead ball people noticed. It was by far the longest HR in the park until Babe came along.

    Joe Jackson had only 18 home runs at home and 36 on the road. Before they changed the ball in 19' half of his career HR were not hit over the fence. This coming from a guy with the same Relative Isolated Slugging career numbers as 500-600 HR players of later eras.

    He blows away everyone else 1910-1920 in raw/isolated slugging. It's mostly masked by his parks. Ex: he hit twice as many triples at home as on the road. Most if not almost all of those triples would be home runs in the 20s and 30s.
    Last edited by Floyd Gondolli; 01-04-2018, 12:11 AM.

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  • Badge714
    replied
    I looked at a list of American League batting leaders in 1920 and found Shoeless Joe very high in each category, usually placing in the top five. I selected that year because it was the year he hit his most home runs, 12, which was far behind Ruth's total of 54. But, who wasn't far behind?

    I'm still impressed with Shoeless Joe's throwing arm. Here is one man's list of the 40 best outfield arms in history. He has Ruth the 15th best and Jackson the 10th. Number 1 was Roberto Clemente (266 assists). Number 2 was the "Reading Rifle," Carl Furillo (151 assists). This is not to start any arguments. I just found it interesting:

    http://bleacherreport.com/articles/1...seball-history
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    Last edited by Badge714; 01-02-2018, 03:33 PM.

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  • Sultan_1895-1948
    replied
    Ruth was swinging from the heels and crushing baseballs as a young teen at St Mary's. It is thought that watching Bro Matthias crush high towering fungos had an influence. There is no record of Ruth even seeing Jackson play until he became a pro.

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  • Floyd Gondolli
    replied
    He was a much better power hitter and slugger. He actually held the bat so far off the handle that his pinkie finger was off the bat. Among all time greats, only Lajoie and Delahanty are known to approach hitting to this extreme prior to Jackson. You won't find that nuance and depth with your Googling, through.

    What (specifically) am I ignoring or neglecting to acknowledge re: Joe Jackson's (pretty much) unprecedented isolated slugging numbers (read: true power in the modern sense), his hitting approach, and his influence on Babe Ruth?

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  • Honus Wagner Rules
    replied
    Originally posted by Floyd Gondolli View Post

    Thank you, Badge, for substantiating the obvious...when one person is pontificating redundantly, and demonstrably hasn't read or researched anything on this topic....( beyond the breadth and depth yielded vis-a-vis a 10 second Google search.)
    Yes, Floyd, stop with your Google searches. Your complete ignorance of what I have researched not withstanding I'm not going rehash stuff I researched and have posted for years here at BBF. You can look it up yourself. If you truly believe Joe Jackson was a better hitter than Ty Cobb then I will not waste my time responding any longer. Good day sir.
    Last edited by Honus Wagner Rules; 12-31-2017, 10:49 PM.

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