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  • Babe and fan girl muscle.jpgGIRL POINT SMALL.jpgBabe and more girls......jpgBabe and Lou Gehrig girls tee shirts.jpg They never saw him play, odds are some of their parents saw him play.. Possible their parents w ere not born until after he had passed away......................but they know who he is, still a draw.
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    • It was said years ago, the greatest event to see in the game, Babe Ruth hitting a home run, second greatest, to see Babe Ruth strike out. BABE STRIKES OUT..JPG

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      • He is every Babe Etch A Sketch.jpgBabe corn maze Sunderland Maine.jpgBabe tortilla.jpg where........................ Second pic, shot from an air plane, a corn field in Maine and even a tortilla. No one like him with the staying power, not even Ali, no one. Ali was great, but he was in our time, Babe has been gone for decades.

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        • I was of the belief that his stance was a factor in his power, long ball hitting.
          Back to Babe in stride to swing..jpg the pitcher and placement of his front foot.

          He was actually "uncoiling" his body from that stance. Add that part to his swing, lots of momentum.

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          • Babe header 5.JPG Long before the "head first" slide became more common. The Babe, he was out on this play. against Washington.
            The pitcher, concerned to see if he was OK, thought it might be Walter Johnson, maybe not. babe head first sequence.JPG
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            Last edited by SHOELESSJOE3; 01-05-2018, 01:45 PM.

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            • Originally posted by SHOELESSJOE3 View Post
              I was of the belief that his stance was a factor in his power, long ball hitting.
              Back to Babe in stride to swing..jpg the pitcher and placement of his front foot.

              He was actually "uncoiling" his body from that stance. Add that part to his swing, lots of momentum.
              Along with these two, a favorite photo of Ruth. They convey brutal but controlled power.
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              This gallery has 2 photos.
              Last edited by Badge714; 01-05-2018, 07:30 PM.
              ". . . the Ruth, the whole Ruth and nothing but the Ruth . . ."

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              • https://www.baseball-fever.com/forum...80#post2777180

                Brother Gilbert, Young Babe Ruth, – His Early Life and Baseball Career, from the Memoirs of an Xaverian Brother

                "To dissipate ill-founded rumors, given currency after the vision of the sports world had been blessed with Ruth’s rhythmic swing at the plate, it might be well to state here that Ruth’s stance on that memorable day in 1914, and the one that he employed as he bowed off the stage at Pittsburgh years later, were identical. Rodger Pippen, Bill Morrisette, George Lee and others who saw him break in and who followed him closely across the years of his glamorous career, bear enthusiastic testimony to that statement.

                "The late Jack Dunn, manager and owner of the Orioles that year pooh-poohed the suggestion of changing his stance. And when the final appraisal of great managers is made – if ever – Jack Dunn will be given a place in the front rank. The discerner of the luminaries of future diamond stars, Dunn had the perspective to recognize potential where it was most latent. 'Don’t tamper with Ruth,' said Dunn to his coaches, 'that fellow is a natural.' And the writer is convinced that his stance never changed."

                https://www.baseball-fever.com/forum...48#post2777248




                Babe Ruth - Interviewed for Baseball Magazine, February, 1918

                "When I was a kid, I used to play baseball most of the time. There was no 154-game schedule for us. The year that we didn’t get in more than 200 games was a slack season. On most good days, when we had the time, we staged a doubleheader and sometimes on Sundays we had three games. I wasn’t a pitcher in those days until I was pretty nearly through my course. My main job was catching behind the bat. I also played first base and the outfield. Three hundred averaged didn’t cut much ice in those days. I used to hit .450 or .500. I kept track one season and found that I made over 60 home runs. The last two years I pitched and got along pretty well. But I never lost my taste for hitting and don’t ever expect to.
                Last edited by Sultan_1895-1948; 01-05-2018, 08:25 PM.

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                • Originally posted by elmer View Post
                  Grantland Rice article titled Greatest Natural Batsman Springfield Daily Republican June 27, 1932.
                  Great find, elmer!!!

                  Apparently Grantland Rice (likely the greatest and most respected Sportswriter of his generation) wasn't completely fabricating (and publishing) quotes from Babe Ruth himself. Who'd have thunk it?

                  "The Sportlight: Learning From Others" by Grantland Rice, in The New York Tribune (March 15, 1923), p. 14

                  "The Tumult and the Shouting" Grantland Rice. (1954).

                  "Shoeless: The Life and Times of Joe Jackson" David L. Fleitz, (2001). p. 163-164.
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                  This gallery has 1 photos.
                  Last edited by Floyd Gondolli; 01-06-2018, 10:48 PM.

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                  • Capture.PNG
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                    • Is it really unthinkable to believe that Ruth might have emulated and took tips from perhaps the greatest slugger baseball had ever seen to that point? Or... are we to simply and blindly Genuflect At The Altar of Ruth and worship him as a deity who was created and made perfect from the day he first started playing baseball?

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                      • Originally posted by Floyd Gondolli View Post
                        Is it really unthinkable to believe that Ruth might have emulated and took tips from perhaps the greatest slugger baseball had ever seen to that point? Or... are we to simply and blindly Genuflect At The Altar of Ruth and worship him as a deity who was created and made perfect from the day he first started playing baseball?
                        Are you purposely being obtuse?

                        Look...it has nothing to do with any ALTAR or any worship. Get that noob ass mind-set outta here. It has everything to do with research and logic. Did you read anything I posted? It is fact that Ruth was swinging from the heels before he had ever seen Jackson play. As I stated, it is possible he implemented something in later years that he attributed to Jackson, but those who saw Ruth crushing baseballs at St. Mary's testify his stance and swing never changed.

                        It's laughable that you somehow try to create a VS scenario and make it out like I have something against Jackson to prop Ruth up. I have never tried to do that. Only speak truth. Thousands of posts will testify to that. And btw I am one of the biggest Shoeless supporters here, who project his decline to be amazing had he not been banned. It is not a case of Ruth vs anybody. Ruth was Ruth from the get-go. I doubt there's a single thing you can teach me about either player, but keep trolling your nonsense.

                        **** like this is the reason the site is dying. Sad.
                        Last edited by Sultan_1895-1948; 01-07-2018, 12:41 AM.

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                        • Originally posted by Sultan_1895-1948 View Post

                          Are you purposely being obtuse?

                          Look...it has nothing to do with any ALTAR or any worship. Get that noob ass mind-set outta here. It has everything to do with research and logic. Did you read anything I posted? It is fact that Ruth was swinging from the heels before he had ever seen Jackson play. As I stated, it is possible he implemented something in later years that he attributed to Jackson, but those who saw Ruth crushing baseballs at St. Mary's testify his stance and swing never changed.

                          It's laughable that you somehow try to create a VS scenario and make it out like I have something against Jackson to prop Ruth up. I have never tried to do that. Only speak truth. Thousands of posts will testify to that. And btw I am one of the biggest Shoeless supporters here, who project his decline to be amazing had he not been banned. It is not a case of Ruth vs anybody. Ruth was Ruth from the get-go. I doubt there's a single thing you can teach me about either player, but keep trolling your nonsense.

                          **** like this is the reason the site is dying. Sad.
                          No question about Ruth swinging from the heels from Day One. Smelser is excellent on that point. Remember the big and little yards at St. Mary's? When Ruth came to bat players on the adjacent field took a rest knowing Ruth would send the ball onto their field of play. The writer Paul Eaton wrote as much during Ruth's rookie year with the Red Sox in 1915. I found this on the website "Fenway's s Best Players - Left Fielders":

                          Although Babe Ruth didn’t play every day with the Red Sox until May 1918, the idea of putting him in the regular lineup was first mentioned in the press during his rookie season. Calling Babe “one of the best natural sluggers ever in the game,” Washington sportswriter Paul Eaton thought Ruth “might even be more valuable in some regular position than he is on the slab—a free suggestion for Manager Bill Carrigan.” The Boston Post reported that summer that Babe “cherishes the hope that he may someday be the leading slugger of the country.”

                          In 1915, Ruth batted .315 and topped the Red Sox with four home runs. Braggo Roth led the AL with seven homers, but he had 384 at-bats compared to Babe’s 92. Ruth didn’t have enough at-bats to qualify, but his .576 slugging percentage was higher than the official leaders in the American League (Jack Fournier .491), the National League (Gavvy Cravath .510), and the Federal League (Benny Kauff .509).

                          I don't wish to get in an argument here, but to the extent that Ruth emulated anyone it had to be Brother Matthias. From the SABR website:

                          “He taught me to read and write and he taught me the difference between right and wrong,” Ruth said of the Canadian-born priest. “He was the father I needed and the greatest man I’ve ever known.”1 Brother Matthias also spent many afternoons tossing a worn-out baseball in the air and swatting it out to the boys. Little George watched, bug-eyed. “I had never seen anything like that in my life,” he recalled. “I think I was born as a hitter the first day I ever saw him hit a baseball.”2 The impressionable youngster imitated Matthias’s hitting style—gripping the bat tightly down at the knobbed end, taking a big swing at the ball—as well as his way of running with quick, tiny steps.

                          When asked in 1918 about playing baseball at St. Mary’s, Ruth said he had little difficulty anywhere on the field. “Sometimes I pitched. Sometimes I caught, and frequently I played the outfield and infield. It was all the same to me. All I wanted was to play. I didn’t care much where.”3 In one St. Mary’s game in 1913, Ruth, then 18 years old, caught, played third base (even though he threw left-handed), and pitched, striking out six men, and collecting a double, a triple, and a home run. That summer, he was allowed to pitch with local amateur and semipro teams on weekends. Impressed with his performances, Jack Dunn signed Ruth to his minor-league Baltimore Orioles club the following February.

                          Babe Ruth met Brother Matthias in 1902 so he was all of seven years of age when he watched in "bug-eyed" wonder as his surrogate father hit those howitzer like fungos. Fact is, Ruth killed the ball from his very infancy as a player.
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                          ". . . the Ruth, the whole Ruth and nothing but the Ruth . . ."

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                          • Speaking of Brother Mathias. In the big leagues, Babe bought Mathias a Cadillac, new of course.
                            The car was wrecked in an accident, Babe bought him another Caddy.

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                            • Ben Egan Caught Ruth in 1914 Orioles camp in Fayetteville

                              "Forget him? How can I ever forget him? It would be pleasant to say that I developed Ruth as a pitcher, but that would be nothing but hogwash. Babe knew how to pitch the first day I saw him. I didn’t have to tell him anything. He even knew how to hold runners on base. Believe me, those priests at that school he went to must have taught him something. Or maybe he taught himself. I don’t know. All I know is he was the best-looking kid I’d ever seen and I couldn’t wait to tell Dunnie about him.

                              You see, Dunn wasn’t at that camp when we opened up. He had put me in charge of the team, but there was also a coach, Sam Steinman, who took it upon himself to issue orders to the players. One day, when it rained, he told us all to work out in the armory, in a room so small we were all in danger of being skulled by thrown balls. That made me mad, so I sent a wire to Dunn in Baltimore and told him there was dissension and that he had better get down there.

                              Two days later he showed up, and one of his first things he said to me was, ‘Ben, how does that kid from the orphanage look?’ and I said, ‘Dunnie, you won’t be able to keep him a half-season. He’s got wonderful control, just perfect, and he can hit a ball a mile, but he’s a wild kid.’

                              ‘What do you mean, wild?’ Dunn asked, and I said, ‘Oh, he’s just high spirited.’

                              Just then, as we were walking down the street, Ruth came along on a bicycle, tried to pass a hay wagon and crashed into the back of it. When we got to him, he was laying there in the street. ‘Kid,’ Dunn told him, ‘if you want to go back to that home, just keep riding those bicycles.’

                              Ruth wasn’t a bad kid, just wild. If he saw a bicycle on the street, he’d get on it and ride off. One morning he found a horse hitched to a post, so he mounted it, rode down the sidewalk and right smack into a Greek confectionery, scattering the employees and the customers all over the place.

                              I remember the game especially against the Phillies. Ruth was pitching, and Josh Devore was in right field for the Phils. I was a base runner on second, and Sherry Magee, who was playing second, kept beckoning Devore to come in more so he could nab me at the plate if Ruth should single. But Babe then hit the ball so far over Devore’s head we never could find out where it landed. The ball struck in a potato patch, but it rained during the night, and when we went out the next morning to see if we could find the ball, we found it was impossible to locate it."
                              Last edited by Sultan_1895-1948; 01-07-2018, 04:46 PM.

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                              • Bill J. 3.jpg Why Luke Easter on a Babe thread. Bill Jenkinson baseball historian, in particular subject Babe Ruth. Received this letter from Bill a few years ago, he was looking for some info on Luke Easter, played some years here in Buffalo. I did send some info and Bill in return sent me the following. What led me to look back on this, today is Bill's birthday. The reason, just to show his method on any subject he is working on. Agree with him or not, there is no doubt he puts his all into his work. Hand written and so complete in detail.


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