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*Babe Ruth Thread*

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  • Originally posted by Honus Wagner Rules View Post
    I'm sure this has been discussed before. Did the Babe actually copy Joe Jackson's swing? I know there is a well known quote that has Ruth saying that he did. Is the quote authentic? When and to who did Ruth say this to? I find it hard to believe that Ruth copied Jackson's swing since Ruth probably never saw Jackson play until Ruth was reach the majors. That seems kind of late to be changing one's swing wholesale.
    --July 11, 1914 vs. Cleveland on the day Ruth arrived with the club:

    "Jackson came to bat, the first time Ruth had ever seen him play, and singled sharply to Tris Speaker in CF" from Babe. The Legend Comes to Life by Robert W. Creamer

    By the way Ruth went 7 and gave up 2 earned for his first career win.

    --Ruth's swing was known as a "follow-through swing" in the deadball era before slowly falling out of use as the style became the norm.
    bluesky5
    Registered User
    Last edited by bluesky5; 06-01-2019, 12:07 AM.
    "No matter how great you were once upon a time — the years go by, and men forget,” - W. A. Phelon in Baseball Magazine in 1915. “Ross Barnes, forty years ago, was as great as Cobb or Wagner ever dared to be. Had scores been kept then as now, he would have seemed incomparably marvelous.”

    Comment


    • Originally posted by bluesky5 View Post

      July 11, 1914 vs. Cleveland on the day Ruth arrived with the club:

      "Jackson came to bat, the first time Ruth had ever seen him play, and singled sharply to Tris Speaker in CF" from Babe. The Legend Comes to Life by Robert W. Creamer

      By the way Ruth went 7 and gave up 2 earned for his first career win.
      This is my point. I'm sure Ruth had heard of Jackson like he had heard of Ty Cobb, Honus Wagner, Tris Speaker, Eddie Collins, etc. I find it hard to believe that Jackson was THAT much more impressive in person than Cobb and Speaker. Besides, Speaker was Ruth's teammate thus Ruth saw Speaker hit every day.

      Ruth's swing was known as a "follow-through swing" in the deadball era before slowly falling out of use as the style became the norm.
      Ok.
      Strikeouts are boring! Besides that, they're fascist. Throw some ground balls - it's more democratic.-Crash Davis

      Comment


      • Originally posted by Honus Wagner Rules View Post
        This is my point. I'm sure Ruth had heard of Jackson like he had heard of Ty Cobb, Honus Wagner, Tris Speaker, Eddie Collins, etc. I find it hard to believe that Jackson was THAT much more impressive in person than Cobb and Speaker. Besides, Speaker was Ruth's teammate thus Ruth saw Speaker hit every day.


        Ok.
        Thought maybe the bottom part would help if you were trying to search for the origins of Ruth's swing. I do believe Zack Wheat and Jackson were two of the earlier players to successfully swing with both hands together at the knob most of the time. Tim Jordan and Jack Fournier didn't quite have the skills necessary to succeed with it.
        "No matter how great you were once upon a time — the years go by, and men forget,” - W. A. Phelon in Baseball Magazine in 1915. “Ross Barnes, forty years ago, was as great as Cobb or Wagner ever dared to be. Had scores been kept then as now, he would have seemed incomparably marvelous.”

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        • Boston Globe January 17, 1930
          BG 1.17.1930.png

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          • Natural born entertainer, on and off the field. Babe Ruth Japanese.JPG

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            • Anyone Know?

              Is it true . . . that the Babe once, for a publicity stunt, caught a ball dropped 250 feet from an airplane over Mitchell Field, Long island? (Circa 1926)

              I do know it is true that when the Curtiss Candy Company in 1920 (in the most dastardly manner) renamed, re-released and repackaged their chocolate candy bar the Baby Ruth, they dropped them out of airplanes via mini parachutes on to the streets of major cities in 40 different states.

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              • Babe catches ball dropped from airplane.jpg Some where in my Ruth files I have the detail but can't locate them at this time. Here is a pic of the Bam making the catch. From airplane.
                Not only the 250 to 300 foot drop but to be considered the plane was moving at the time.
                Not the same as a ball dropped from a stationary point.
                SHOELESSJOE3
                Registered User
                Last edited by SHOELESSJOE3; 07-27-2019, 07:06 AM.

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                • Ball Drop poc 1 Babe catching ball dropped from building 8-17-22.jpgBall drop Babe Catches Ball building July 18 1922.jpgBabe Ball Drop text small.JPG This did not make the Yankee owners happy. This guy Ball Drop pic 2Babe catching ball dropped from building.jpg risking injury in these stunts.
                  SHOELESSJOE3
                  Registered User
                  Last edited by SHOELESSJOE3; 07-27-2019, 07:20 AM.

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                  • Talk about a tough loss, May 9, 1918. Babe Ruth starting pitcher goes 5 for 5, single, 3 doubles and a triple. Losing pitcher to Washington in 10 innings, gives up 4 runs, 2 are unearned
                    Winning pitcher,the great one Walter Johnson. Johnson pinch hits 9th inning, his sac fly ties game, extra innings, stays in the game pitching Babe Ruth 1918 box.JPG . He faces Ruth in the 10th, Babe hit his 3rd double off the scoreboard. With one out, Babe thrown out attempted steal of 3rd. Wondering, has any other pitcher had a 5 for 5 day at the plate.
                    SHOELESSJOE3
                    Registered User
                    Last edited by SHOELESSJOE3; 07-28-2019, 06:57 AM.

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                    • Love reading about great players who were allowed to compete, succeed and push the limits of their potential. Probably never going to see that again.
                      "No matter how great you were once upon a time — the years go by, and men forget,” - W. A. Phelon in Baseball Magazine in 1915. “Ross Barnes, forty years ago, was as great as Cobb or Wagner ever dared to be. Had scores been kept then as now, he would have seemed incomparably marvelous.”

                      Comment


                      • I saw this on Facebook. Really cool.

                        FB_IMG_1569022224800.jpg
                        Strikeouts are boring! Besides that, they're fascist. Throw some ground balls - it's more democratic.-Crash Davis

                        Comment


                        • After the 1926 season came to an end some changes made, Comiskey Park. A second deck added and a roof over the deck in right field.. Owner Charles Comiskey made the comment, I doubt anyone will it one out of here now. Did not take Babe Ruth long, hit one out August 16, 1927. From the El Paso Post, August 17, 1927. Babe Ruth comiskey_edited-1.jpg
                          SHOELESSJOE3
                          Registered User
                          Last edited by SHOELESSJOE3; 09-29-2019, 07:09 AM.

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                          • The Bam give cricket a shot in 1935. Destroys, shatters bat. Chicago Tribune Feb. 1935 Babe London.JPG

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                            • Originally posted by SHOELESSJOE3 View Post
                              The Bam give cricket a shot in 1935. Destroys, shatters bat. Chicago Tribune Feb. 1935
                              Joe, who was this Fairfax fellow, a cricket bowler? Larwood was considered the best bowler of his generation and one of the greatest of all-time. Estimates are the he threw between 90-100 MPH. I know nothing of cricket but the wikipedia article talks about this guy much the way Walter Johnson would be. Here is a link to Harold Larwood's wikipedia page.
                              "No matter how great you were once upon a time — the years go by, and men forget,” - W. A. Phelon in Baseball Magazine in 1915. “Ross Barnes, forty years ago, was as great as Cobb or Wagner ever dared to be. Had scores been kept then as now, he would have seemed incomparably marvelous.”

                              Comment


                              • Fascinating story! I never heard about this. Shocked he even caught the third one, considering how small players' gloves were back then.

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