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  • Took me a couple of attempts but finally........... did get the word "Ruthian" listed in the Urban Dictionary.
    Now again, I will try Websters Dictionary, under slang, so far no luck.
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    • Ted Lyons on Babe and Ted.
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      • Babe Ruth's April 4, 1919, Tampa HR:

        With respect to Ruth's historic Tampa HR, I thought you all might be interested in what John McGraw had to say about it. This is taken from his memoirs, written in 1923.

        John McGraw: My Thirty Years in Baseball, by John McGraw, (as told to Boze Bulger), 1923, pp. 235.
        "The longest hit I ever saw, and I feel pretty sure that it was the longest ever made, was a wallop by Babe Ruth in an exhibition game down in Tampa, Florida, off "Columbia" George Smith, who was pitching for the Giants.

        I didn't believe it possible for a man to hit a baseball as far as that. He caught the ball squarely on the nose and it started like an ordinary long fly. Instead of coming down, though, it kept rising.

        "My God," exclaimed one of the players, "where is that ball going?"

        The drive cleared the field, a race track and then the fence. Interest in its length was greater than in the game itself. For the rest of the game that was all we talked about.

        To be sure of its length a party of newspaper men and players went out and measured the distance accurately. That ball had traveled 587 feet. Mind you, that is just thirteen feet short of two hundred yards! Can you imagine such a drive?

        That hit by Ruth would have cleared the bleachers and the center-field fence in the Polo Grounds. It was easily the longest hit I ever saw, or ever expect to see.

        Often I am asked if any of the old-timers like Dan Brouthers or Ed Delahanty could hit a ball as hard as Ruth. My answer is "no." I don't think a man ever lived who could put such force behind a ball. (John McGraw: My Thirty Years in Baseball, by John McGraw, (as told to Boze Bulger), 1923, pp. 183-184.)

        Elsewhere in his book, McGraw had this to say about Babe.

        "I have chosen him because of his spectacular hitting. Nobody could ever hit a ball like Babe Ruth. He can play any of the outfield positions and as a pinch hitter is supreme. Despite his great bulk and apparent slowness Babe Ruth is a corking good base runner. He has been the greatest drawing card that the game has ever produced.

        I have to smile when I realize that I have picked a team for the American League and, in my opinion, have made it so strong as to necessitate keeping Babe Ruth on the bench as a utility outfielder." (John McGraw: My Thirty Years in Baseball, by John McGraw, (as told to Boze Bulger), 1923, pp. 235.)
        ----------------------------------------------
        Babe Ruth: His Life and Legend, by Kal Wagenheim, 1974
        Frazee felt better about Ruth's contract a few days later, after a Red Sox exhibition game against the Giants at the old fairgrounds in Tampa. Batting against "Columbia George" Smith, the Babe walloped a ball so far over right fielder Ross Youngs' head that those who saw the blow were awestruck. After the game, as Youngs stood where the ball fell, a group of writers - including Fred Lieb, Frank Graham, Paul Shannon, and Melvin Webb - observed as someone took a surveyor's tape and measured the distance to home plate: 579 feet!
        ---------------------------------
        Babe Ruth : Launching the Legend, by Jim Reisler (McGraw-Hill)© 2004 by Jim Reisler, ISBN: 0-0714-3244-2

        Chapter 1
        Ed Barrow recognized that for all Ruth's prodigious talents on the mound, the Babe could be of more value with his bat. On April 4, 1919, in a spring training game at the old fairgrounds in Tampa against John McGraw's Giants, Ruth cracked what Barrow called many years later "the longest home run in history." Batting in the second inning against "Columbia George" Smith, so named for the university he had attended--rare was the big leaguer who attended college in those days--Ruth sent a pitch high over the right-center-field wall, far above right fielder Ross Youngs's head, clear out of the fairgrounds and into a neighboring hospital yard. After the game, as Youngs stood where the ball fell, a group of writers watched as somebody dug up a surveyor's tape and measured the distance to home plate--579 feet.

        Comment


        • Originally posted by Bill Burgess View Post
          Babe Ruth's April 4, 1919, Tampa HR:

          With respect to Ruth's historic Tampa HR, I thought you all might be interested in what John McGraw had to say about it. This is taken from his memoirs, written in 1923.

          John McGraw: My Thirty Years in Baseball, by John McGraw, (as told to Boze Bulger), 1923, pp. 235.
          "The longest hit I ever saw, and I feel pretty sure that it was the longest ever made, was a wallop by Babe Ruth in an exhibition game down in Tampa, Florida, off "Columbia" George Smith, who was pitching for the Giants.

          I didn't believe it possible for a man to hit a baseball as far as that. He caught the ball squarely on the nose and it started like an ordinary long fly. Instead of coming down, though, it kept rising.

          "My God," exclaimed one of the players, "where is that ball going?"

          The drive cleared the field, a race track and then the fence. Interest in its length was greater than in the game itself. For the rest of the game that was all we talked about.

          To be sure of its length a party of newspaper men and players went out and measured the distance accurately. That ball had traveled 587 feet. Mind you, that is just thirteen feet short of two hundred yards! Can you imagine such a drive?

          That hit by Ruth would have cleared the bleachers and the center-field fence in the Polo Grounds. It was easily the longest hit I ever saw, or ever expect to see.

          Often I am asked if any of the old-timers like Dan Brouthers or Ed Delahanty could hit a ball as hard as Ruth. My answer is "no." I don't think a man ever lived who could put such force behind a ball. (John McGraw: My Thirty Years in Baseball, by John McGraw, (as told to Boze Bulger), 1923, pp. 183-184.)

          Elsewhere in his book, McGraw had this to say about Babe.

          "I have chosen him because of his spectacular hitting. Nobody could ever hit a ball like Babe Ruth. He can play any of the outfield positions and as a pinch hitter is supreme. Despite his great bulk and apparent slowness Babe Ruth is a corking good base runner. He has been the greatest drawing card that the game has ever produced.

          I have to smile when I realize that I have picked a team for the American League and, in my opinion, have made it so strong as to necessitate keeping Babe Ruth on the bench as a utility outfielder." (John McGraw: My Thirty Years in Baseball, by John McGraw, (as told to Boze Bulger), 1923, pp. 235.)
          ----------------------------------------------
          Babe Ruth: His Life and Legend, by Kal Wagenheim, 1974
          Frazee felt better about Ruth's contract a few days later, after a Red Sox exhibition game against the Giants at the old fairgrounds in Tampa. Batting against "Columbia George" Smith, the Babe walloped a ball so far over right fielder Ross Youngs' head that those who saw the blow were awestruck. After the game, as Youngs stood where the ball fell, a group of writers - including Fred Lieb, Frank Graham, Paul Shannon, and Melvin Webb - observed as someone took a surveyor's tape and measured the distance to home plate: 579 feet!
          ---------------------------------
          Babe Ruth : Launching the Legend, by Jim Reisler (McGraw-Hill)© 2004 by Jim Reisler, ISBN: 0-0714-3244-2

          Chapter 1
          Ed Barrow recognized that for all Ruth's prodigious talents on the mound, the Babe could be of more value with his bat. On April 4, 1919, in a spring training game at the old fairgrounds in Tampa against John McGraw's Giants, Ruth cracked what Barrow called many years later "the longest home run in history." Batting in the second inning against "Columbia George" Smith, so named for the university he had attended--rare was the big leaguer who attended college in those days--Ruth sent a pitch high over the right-center-field wall, far above right fielder Ross Youngs's head, clear out of the fairgrounds and into a neighboring hospital yard. After the game, as Youngs stood where the ball fell, a group of writers watched as somebody dug up a surveyor's tape and measured the distance to home plate--579 feet.

          Good one Bill. Here is one pic of Plant Field, supposedly 1923. you can see the race track on the right field side.
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          • Found some good ones on ebay:

            1921 during spring training at Hot Springs, Arkansas:




            1933: 9 IP, 5 ER, W:






            Wounds on left calf:






            HR was actually the day before caption, off W Johnson:


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            • Halcyon days (if the Babe had any!):


              1926:


              08 Oct 1927, Bronx, New York, New York, USA --- The Babe and His Family. Bronx, New York: George Herman "Babe" Ruth with his wife and baby daughter, Dorothy, snapped before the third game of the World Series today.:




              Love the stogy!:










              Last edited by SultanOfWhat; 10-15-2009, 01:11 AM.
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              • Sultan, on that pic you posted of Babe's last game pitched, Oct.1, 1933.
                It's the Babe so there has to be some kind of story about that game.
                He pitched a 9 inning game in 1921.
                He pitched a 9 inning game in 1930, complete beats Bosox 9-3.
                He then pitched this game in 1933, a complete game.

                So before this game he had pitched only one 9 inning game over 12 years and yet pitches a complete game in 1933, beats the Bosox the team where he got his start, 6-5.
                After that game he said his arm was so sore he tipped his cap with his right hand, for a week after that game he ate with his right hand, could not lift his left arm. He was up 6-4 late in the game, could have left, said he did not because he knew some of those there came to see him pitch. So much for pitch count after such a long layoff, unheard of at that time

                But it's Babe, not only the winning pitcher he also helped hmself by hitting his 34th home run of the season.
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                • The two titans in a couple of their many meetings. What I wouldn't give to have seen a game where these two giants met face to face.
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                  • Harry Frazee to Babe.
                    A bonus 1918 season......1000.00 if he wins 24 games............an additional 1000.00 if he wins 30 games.

                    See Harry's signature at bottom.
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                    • Great stuff, SHOELESSJOE3.

                      A 1918 Babe Ruth game-used bat recently sold for $537,750, the highest price ever paid for a non-autographed Ruth bat. Heritage Auctions conducted the sale Oct 1-2.

                      The bat is 36 inches, 39 ounces.


                      "As a bat used by the game's greatest figure during the historic 1918 World Championship Red Sox season, the importance of this lot is difficult to overstate. The fact that this precise bat served as the prototype for all Ruth models to follow from July 9, 1918 through 1926 further elevates the offering toward the outer limits of baseball relevance, challenging and surpassing all but a few relics housed within the Baseball Hall of Fame.

                      The bat remains in stunning, undamaged condition today, its length and weight of thirty-six inches and thirty-nine ounces recalling the baby Babe's personal specs in his years in both Boston and the first half of his Yankees service. A ream of paperwork from leading authenticators John Taube (who calls the bat "arguably the finest and most historically significant bat extant") and Vince Malta is available by fax for serious bidders. Dave Bushing and MEARS likewise chime in, providing a grade of A10*, the asterisk denoting superiority even to the few other A10 graded Ruth bats."
















                      Story:
                      http://www.prnewswire.com/news-relea...-63680737.html

                      More on the bat:
                      http://sports.ha.com/common/view_ite...=PR-PRTE100609
                      Last edited by SultanOfWhat; 10-15-2009, 08:18 PM.
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                      • Originally posted by SultanOfWhat View Post
                        SHOELESSJOE3, I will post a few dozen Yankee Stadium pics from the World Series during Ruth's days later today. Also some Opening Day pics as well.
                        SULTAN, thanks for those World Series game pics played at Yankee Stadium.
                        As you may remember that new found video of Babe, some saying it can't be the 1928 WS because there is none of the decoration, no bunting, Keith Olberman's opinion.

                        Now we see in this section and in the Parks section at BBF, some pics of the 1928 WS and we do see bunting at the stadium.

                        But, if we look at the pics of the 1928 WS at NY, all the bunting is on the second deck, I don't see any at the ground level. Did I miss some, correct me if wrong.
                        In the Babe video all we see is the lower rail, with no bunting. What I'm saying, unless I missed something to say that can't be the 1928 WS because there is no bunting is no longer an issue.
                        We can't be sure that the pics and the dates are correct in the pics but if they are, bunting does not enter the equation anymore.

                        The strongest case against the video, that it is not the 1928 WS, looks like it's not about the lack of bunting but the better argument is the batter following Ruth does not look like Gehrig, who did follow Babe in the 1928 WS.

                        Here are two pics labeled 1928 World Series at NY.
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                        • Not to change the subject, but here's an idea.

                          If they could find a Babe Ruth game-used uniform, they might be able to test it for sweat-DNA. They might swab it for DNA.

                          Then they could test it against anything that his daughter, Dorothy, left behind to prove his paternity. Many people are still sceptical of his paternity to Dorothy, especially Clare's biological daughter, and Babe's adopted daughter, Julia Ruth Stevens (still alive & living in Conway, NH at the age of 93.

                          Comment


                          • Originally posted by SHOELESSJOE3 View Post
                            SULTAN, thanks for those World Series game pics played at Yankee Stadium.
                            As you may remember that new found video of Babe, some saying it can't be the 1928 WS because there is none of the decoration, no bunting, Keith Olberman's opinion.

                            Now we see in this section and in the Parks section at BBF, some pics of the 1928 WS and we do see bunting at the stadium.

                            But, if we look at the pics of the 1928 WS at NY, all the bunting is on the second deck, I don't see any at the ground level. Did I miss some, correct me if wrong.
                            In the Babe video all we see is the lower rail, with no bunting. What I'm saying, unless I missed something to say that can't be the 1928 WS because there is no bunting is no longer an issue.
                            We can't be sure that the pics and the dates are correct in the pics but if they are, bunting does not enter the equation anymore.

                            The strongest case against the video, that it is not the 1928 WS, looks like it's not about the lack of bunting but the better argument is the batter following Ruth does not look like Gehrig, who did follow Babe in the 1928 WS.

                            Here are two pics labeled 1928 World Series at NY.
                            You are correct in pointing out that there is no shot of areas that would have shown bunting in the 1928 WS in the newly discovered YS/Ruth footage.

                            However, It is clear that the batter following Ruth is not Gehrig, and it is almost certain that he is in fact Bob Meusel.

                            The line-up was in fact Gehrig-Ruth-Meusel (the order depicted in the film footage) for the September 9th-12th 1928 games in YS versus the Athletics, while it was Ruth-Gehrig-Meusel for all 4 1928 WS games. Retrosheet has the box scores:

                            http://www.retrosheet.org/boxesetc/1928/YPS_1928.htm
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                            • Originally posted by SultanOfWhat View Post
                              You are correct in pointing out that there is no shot of areas that would have shown bunting in the 1928 WS in the newly discovered YS/Ruth footage.

                              However, It is clear that the batter following Ruth is not Gehrig, and it is almost certain that he is in fact Bob Meusel.

                              The line-up was in fact Gehrig-Ruth-Meusel (the order depicted in the film footage) for the September 9th-12th 1928 games in YS versus the Athletics, while it was Ruth-Gehrig-Meusel for all 4 1928 WS games. Retrosheet has the box scores:

                              http://www.retrosheet.org/boxesetc/1928/YPS_1928.htm
                              Correct, thats why I say my first shot, the 1928 WS can't be. For sure that does not look like Gehrig coming to the plate and does look like Bob.

                              I was just taking Keith's bunting out of the issue.

                              I've gone over a number of box scores in regular season at Proquest news archives looking for more games where Bob followed Babe in the regular 1928 season.
                              I think Keith could be right with that date he brought up, if I recall in September, I think Sept.9.

                              Comment


                              • Originally posted by Bill Burgess View Post
                                Not to change the subject, but here's an idea.

                                If they could find a Babe Ruth game-used uniform, they might be able to test it for sweat-DNA. They might swab it for DNA.

                                Then they could test it against anything that his daughter, Dorothy, left behind to prove his paternity. Many people are still sceptical of his paternity to Dorothy, especially Clare's biological daughter, and Babe's adopted daughter, Julia Ruth Stevens (still alive & living in Conway, NH at the age of 93.
                                According to his granddaughter Linda Tosetti, this procedure had already
                                been tried with negative results. A current effort, in other areas to show proof, is ongoing.

                                Thousands have seen it for themselves
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