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*Babe Ruth Thread*

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  • #46
    On the building of Yankee Stadium, I got a kick out of this article that appeared in some newspapers in 1923. Boy, this one was way off. Also in that article it was stated that the park should have been named "Ruth's Temple" since the reason for it's existence, it's use would be a place of worship for those who idolize Babe Ruth.

    Further the claim that there was no sound reason, "no demand for it and small use" for it. Small use, well we know what it meant as far as the game of baseball was concerned...... but just a few other events that took place there. Two Joe Louis vs Max Schmeling bouts, and many other big boxing events. That Notre Dame vs Army game, the site of that Rockne "Win one for the Gipper"..... Pope Paul visit in the 1960's. The Beatles, what can I say no offense but they chose Shea Stadium, why.
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    • #47
      Does anyone know if any players are still alive that played against The Great One? It just crossed my mind that their might be a few left alive to tell the stories....

      My grandfather's best friend (born in 1920) grew up in downtown Cleveland and saw Ruth play in 33' and 34'. He was a regular at league park during his teenage years. He said the thing he remembers the most about Ruth is 1) the sound when he made contact, which was incredible and completely unique and 2) the funny way he ran- "on his tippy toes".

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      • #48
        Originally posted by csh19792001
        Does anyone know if any players are still alive that played against The Great One? It just crossed my mind that their might be a few left alive to tell the stories....

        My grandfather's best friend (born in 1920) grew up in downtown Cleveland and saw Ruth play in 33' and 34'. He was a regular at league park during his teenage years. He said the thing he remembers the most about Ruth is 1) the sound when he made contact, which was incredible and completely unique and 2) the funny way he ran- "on his tippy toes".

        I remember reading somewhere, probably like a few months ago, that the last living pitcher to strike out Babe Ruth had died.

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        • #49
          City Stadium / Spring Hill Cemetery
          (Babe Ruth's Home Run)
          In the summer of 1939, a cash-strapped Babe Ruth, who had recently retired from Major League Baseball, was barnstorming the country with his "Bustin' Babes All-Stars" team. Ruth's team played the Lynchburg Cardinals in an exhibition game at City Stadium, and the Babe himself came up to bat in the top of the first inning. Ruth promptly hit a home run of Homeric proportions, a grand slam effort off of Lefty Drbosky, and one much to the delight of the reported crowd of over 5000 in attendance at City Stadium. The Babe, who was reportedly staggering and presumably hung over, sent the first pitch from the hapless Drbosky soaring over the right-field fence, over Wythe Road, over the brick wall of Spring Hill Cemetery, and well into the heart of the graveyard, where it landed and bounced into the in-progress graveside service of Miss Lillian Dunwoody (the ball actually struck the headstone of the neighboring James Bulloch grave, pictured left). The home run ball was promptly snatched up by Miss Dunwoody's grand-nephew, Cornwall, who subsequently refused repeated requests to donate the ball to the City of Lynchburg for museum display. The Ruthian clout was later measured at an astounding 812 feet. Much to the disappointment of the assembled crowd, it was Ruth's only swing and only plate appearance of the day, as he promptly fell asleep in the dugout after completing his home run trot. Despite Ruth's absence from the remainder of the game, the "Bustin' Babes" went on to deliver a 21-1 drubbing to the Lynchburg Cardinals. In 1989, the family of Cornwall Dunwoody donated the Babe Ruth home run ball to the Lynchburg Museum where it is on display.

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          • #50
            Originally posted by Sultan_1895-1948
            Here's that shot in 800 dpi. The wording can be removed too, if you want.
            Randy, the picture Bill Burgess was asking about, the Babe and what was the source and the year it was taken.

            I looked back at the thread Historical Archival Photographs and saw that you had posted the same picture and the description says 1923. Correct me if I'm wrong. It's at that thread and was post #17 and was posted 3/08/2006

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            • #51
              Babe Ruth video:

              http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GVW7bysrvMs
              "I was pitching one day when my glasses clouded up on me. I took them off to polish them. When I looked up to the plate, I saw Jimmie Foxx. The sight of him terrified me so much that I haven't been able to wear glasses since." - Left Gomez

              "(Lou) Gehrig never learned that a ballplayer couldn't be good every day." - Hank Gowdy

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              • #52
                Sultan,

                What the story behind the Ruth/Gehrig feud? Was it because their wives didn't like each other? That's what I've heard. Is it true that when Ruth would hit a HR, Gehrg wouldn't shake his hand when he crossed the plate?
                Strikeouts are boring! Besides that, they're fascist. Throw some ground balls - it's more democratic.-Crash Davis

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                • #53
                  Grert articles, Sultan. It seems like a classic personality conflict. I do remember a few years ago watching some old film of Ruth about to cross home plate after a HR and Gehrig turns his back to ruth to throw away his extra bat. Ruth shakes hands with another teammate and doesn't even look at Gehrig. It seemed strange. Of course there could be nothing to this incident.
                  Strikeouts are boring! Besides that, they're fascist. Throw some ground balls - it's more democratic.-Crash Davis

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                  • #54
                    The time when Babe/Lou didn't speak was actually only for 1933-34, in playing time, and until 1939 off-field. Before that, they were pretty friendly.

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                    • #55
                      Hey everyone, I know Joe has seen these but I don't know if any of you make your way over to the Stadiums area much.

                      These were from an eBay auction sometime ago, I almost bought them and I am kicking myself in the rear for not doing so.





                      I love this one Gehrig is waiting on deck.



                      Closeups of the two.


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                      • #56
                        That was actually a subject of interest to me. I didn't think it looked like Ruth at the plate in the second one but the guy who was selling them I remember him saying something about it being Gehrig with Ruth at the plate.

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                        • #57
                          I love this photo.
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                          Strikeouts are boring! Besides that, they're fascist. Throw some ground balls - it's more democratic.-Crash Davis

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                          • #58
                            Babe at Comiskey
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                            • #59
                              Babe at Comiskey
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                              • #60
                                Babe and Lou, football game?
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