Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

*Babe Ruth Thread*

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #46
    very old-timer who was there has a tale about Sodality Park, San Jose's long-gone semi-pro ballfield. Some remember the day Babe Ruth hit a monster shot past right field. Others tell how Ty Cobb ran back to his hotel when he was jeered after committing an error. Still others recall the "donkey games," which required outfielders to ride donkeys to pursue the ball.

    The memories of Sodality's 27-year existence matter because of the coda. Across Los Gatos Creek from the old ballpark diamond, now home to the Orchard Supply Hardware off San Carlos Street near Bird Avenue, is the Del Monte Cannery, the site Mayor Ron Gonzales covets for major league baseball.

    Comment


    • #47
      Originally posted by elmer
      I also would like to see a less cropped version of that photo
      I have been trying to pin down how high the slope was
      on the outside of the running track for years. My best guess
      is 6-7 feet. Anybody else have ideas? -- or revealing photos?

      the fence as well. My total estimate of slope and fence is 15-16 feet
      in right field. Ruth had it slightly tougher than most think.

      elmer

      Not much that I know of the slope, beginning a search. On the running track. That track was 4 feet wide, 400 feet in length and was actually measured and approved by the AAU. Any record made on that track would be official.

      Comment


      • #48
        On the building of Yankee Stadium, I got a kick out of this article that appeared in some newspapers in 1923. Boy, this one was way off. Also in that article it was stated that the park should have been named "Ruth's Temple" since the reason for it's existence, it's use would be a place of worship for those who idolize Babe Ruth.

        Further the claim that there was no sound reason, "no demand for it and small use" for it. Small use, well we know what it meant as far as the game of baseball was concerned...... but just a few other events that took place there. Two Joe Louis vs Max Schmeling bouts, and many other big boxing events. That Notre Dame vs Army game, the site of that Rockne "Win one for the Gipper"..... Pope Paul visit in the 1960's. The Beatles, what can I say no offense but they chose Shea Stadium, why.
        Attached Files

        Comment


        • #49
          Does anyone know if any players are still alive that played against The Great One? It just crossed my mind that their might be a few left alive to tell the stories....

          My grandfather's best friend (born in 1920) grew up in downtown Cleveland and saw Ruth play in 33' and 34'. He was a regular at league park during his teenage years. He said the thing he remembers the most about Ruth is 1) the sound when he made contact, which was incredible and completely unique and 2) the funny way he ran- "on his tippy toes".

          Comment


          • #50
            Originally posted by csh19792001
            Does anyone know if any players are still alive that played against The Great One? It just crossed my mind that their might be a few left alive to tell the stories....

            My grandfather's best friend (born in 1920) grew up in downtown Cleveland and saw Ruth play in 33' and 34'. He was a regular at league park during his teenage years. He said the thing he remembers the most about Ruth is 1) the sound when he made contact, which was incredible and completely unique and 2) the funny way he ran- "on his tippy toes".

            I remember reading somewhere, probably like a few months ago, that the last living pitcher to strike out Babe Ruth had died.

            Comment


            • #51
              Originally posted by csh19792001
              Does anyone know if any players are still alive that played against The Great One? It just crossed my mind that their might be a few left alive to tell the stories....

              My grandfather's best friend (born in 1920) grew up in downtown Cleveland and saw Ruth play in 33' and 34'. He was a regular at league park during his teenage years. He said the thing he remembers the most about Ruth is 1) the sound when he made contact, which was incredible and completely unique and 2) the funny way he ran- "on his tippy toes".

              Quite funny how some people's memories, especially non-baseball fans, revolve around the little things he did. The way his body contorted upon striking out. Or the little Nomar-esque habits he'd do as he stepped into the box. Most of all though, are the mincing little steps which seem to pop up in many things I've read. Luckily Brother Matthias' fungo hitting made quite an impression on him but also he took after Brother Matthias with his pigeon toed trot. Smelser pointed out that its been cited by track coaches as a better way to run as your feet are pointed inward, which allows all five toes to push together. The pigeon toed thing wasn't just in his run though. Greenberg once said..."If I tried to swing like Babe with my feet together and pigeon-toed and my back to the pitcher, I'd either get beaned on the back of the skull, or I'd strike out oftener than I do." - Hank Greenberg (1947)

              Guy Bush died in '85. How cool would it have been to get a sit-down with that dude. Werber is always a good source, he's still kickin' but time is a rollin'. The treasures of info are slowly fadin'. Good thing that more than enough was documented and written about Ruth. No shortage of info there. Its some of the other players that we should be concerned about.

              Comment


              • #52
                City Stadium / Spring Hill Cemetery
                (Babe Ruth's Home Run)
                In the summer of 1939, a cash-strapped Babe Ruth, who had recently retired from Major League Baseball, was barnstorming the country with his "Bustin' Babes All-Stars" team. Ruth's team played the Lynchburg Cardinals in an exhibition game at City Stadium, and the Babe himself came up to bat in the top of the first inning. Ruth promptly hit a home run of Homeric proportions, a grand slam effort off of Lefty Drbosky, and one much to the delight of the reported crowd of over 5000 in attendance at City Stadium. The Babe, who was reportedly staggering and presumably hung over, sent the first pitch from the hapless Drbosky soaring over the right-field fence, over Wythe Road, over the brick wall of Spring Hill Cemetery, and well into the heart of the graveyard, where it landed and bounced into the in-progress graveside service of Miss Lillian Dunwoody (the ball actually struck the headstone of the neighboring James Bulloch grave, pictured left). The home run ball was promptly snatched up by Miss Dunwoody's grand-nephew, Cornwall, who subsequently refused repeated requests to donate the ball to the City of Lynchburg for museum display. The Ruthian clout was later measured at an astounding 812 feet. Much to the disappointment of the assembled crowd, it was Ruth's only swing and only plate appearance of the day, as he promptly fell asleep in the dugout after completing his home run trot. Despite Ruth's absence from the remainder of the game, the "Bustin' Babes" went on to deliver a 21-1 drubbing to the Lynchburg Cardinals. In 1989, the family of Cornwall Dunwoody donated the Babe Ruth home run ball to the Lynchburg Museum where it is on display.

                Comment


                • #53
                  Originally posted by Sultan_1895-1948
                  Here's that shot in 800 dpi. The wording can be removed too, if you want.
                  Randy, the picture Bill Burgess was asking about, the Babe and what was the source and the year it was taken.

                  I looked back at the thread Historical Archival Photographs and saw that you had posted the same picture and the description says 1923. Correct me if I'm wrong. It's at that thread and was post #17 and was posted 3/08/2006

                  Comment


                  • #54
                    Originally posted by [email protected]
                    I guess 1923, because when else was he looking so lean and trim as a Yankee after 1923?
                    I agree that it was '23.

                    He was pretty dang svelte in '23. Played throughout the season at 215 give or take a few pounds. Let himself go after the season and got up to 240 before going to Hot Springs at getting down to 218 for '24. In '25 he had actually lost around 20 pounds before the collapse. Anyway, in '26 he was under his '23 weight, at 212, and '27 was about 218. After that he was never under 220 but just above it by 5 or 10 pounds when "fit." Weight such a tough thing to go by, and his trademark belly is part of history. People should not let a belly fool them though. This guy was a great athlete through and through. In the end the legs just couldn't carry and his knee (the one he tore cartilage in) started acting up.

                    Originally posted by elmer
                    mine is the long shot of him getting ready to swing because
                    it shows a lot of his technique, There are two from behind
                    homeplate that show him pitching against the Giants in early 20's
                    One of which is not seen as much as the other that i like best.
                    It would be cool, if over on the BR discussion thread, we posted our top 5 or somethin', and kinda explain why...just for curiosity's sake. I'd like to see the ones you're talkin' about. This one is right up there for me. That look in his eyes; just all business.
                    Attached Files

                    Comment


                    • #55
                      Babe Ruth video:

                      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GVW7bysrvMs
                      "I was pitching one day when my glasses clouded up on me. I took them off to polish them. When I looked up to the plate, I saw Jimmie Foxx. The sight of him terrified me so much that I haven't been able to wear glasses since." - Left Gomez

                      "(Lou) Gehrig never learned that a ballplayer couldn't be good every day." - Hank Gowdy

                      Comment


                      • #56
                        Sultan,

                        What the story behind the Ruth/Gehrig feud? Was it because their wives didn't like each other? That's what I've heard. Is it true that when Ruth would hit a HR, Gehrg wouldn't shake his hand when he crossed the plate?
                        Strikeouts are boring! Besides that, they're fascist. Throw some ground balls - it's more democratic.-Crash Davis

                        Comment


                        • #57
                          Originally posted by Honus Wagner Rules
                          Sultan,

                          What the story behind the Ruth/Gehrig feud? Was it because their wives didn't like each other? That's what I've heard. Is it true that when Ruth would hit a HR, Gehrg wouldn't shake his hand when he crossed the plate?
                          From my mini-bio on Babe:

                          Another little tidbit, is the rift/feud between the Babe and Lou Gehrig.
                          Sometime in 1934, 14 yr. old Dorothy was visiting the Gehrig's home in New Rochelle, NY. Lou's Mom Gehrig, commented on how she usually looked like a ragamuffin, compared to how sharply-nattily Claire's daughter, Julia usually looked. Well, another Yankee wife over-hears the remark, and mentions it to another Yankee wife, and ka-boom. Word filters back to Claire, who feels shamed and PISSED. Next day, Babe brings up the remark to Lou.

                          Now Lou is passive and easy-going. There could be a long list of things he can roll with. Telling his mother to mind her own damn business is not on the list. Lou was a Mama's boy all his life. By choice. Now, let me be clear here. No one can ever be criticized for defending one's mother. God forbid. And there is a list a cosmic mile long, of things which are worse than being a Mama's boy.

                          But this is what caused the feud. Babe told Lou to never talk to him again, off the field. But Babe was Babe. Later, he tried to approach Lou and make up, but Lou brushed him off. Babe had been something of an idol/hero to Lou, and a good pal besides. So when Babe turned on him, it had hurt him deep.

                          This silly situation remained until 1939, on Lou Gehrig Day. When Lou uttered his famous heart-felt words, "Today, I feel like the luckiest man on the face of the Earth", Babe walked over and hugged him. Lou didn't shrug him off. So the rift ended that day. And Babe visited him after that too.

                          Comment


                          • #58
                            Originally posted by Honus Wagner Rules
                            Sultan,

                            What the story behind the Ruth/Gehrig feud? Was it because their wives didn't like each other? That's what I've heard. Is it true that when Ruth would hit a HR, Gehrg wouldn't shake his hand when he crossed the plate?
                            Actually its good you bring that up. Not sure if its been dealt with on this thread. Would belong on the last page. I don't think Gehrig ever denied a handshake. They kept things pretty standard in public. The comment by Lou's mother was definately the final straw, but there were little things here and there for years. I think the contract issue in '29 was hurtful to their relationship, if not in a subconscious way. Creamer mentions it.

                            ----------------------------

                            Smelser -

                            The years from age thirty to thirty-nine are more often than not critical years in which a person changes his or her attitude to self and surroundings. If the change is uncomfortable, as it often is, it leads to anger and frustration, called "midcareer crisis." Babe Ruth paradoxically reversed the usual pattern. He knew more peace of mind in that span than before or after. Jocko Conlan told the author Ruth was especially civilized in the early 30s. Excluding the World Series of 1932 he was frank, open, polite, and uncomplaining (to all but Joe McCarthy, one must add). The only symptom that met the crisis norm was a split with Lou Gehrig.

                            In his first years with the Yankees Gehrig had been a leading Ruth fan and almost an errand boy for his idol. While Lou was single, Babe spend a lot of time with the Gehrig family and later said, "It was one of the rare tastes of home life I ever had."

                            Lou married on September 29, 1933. The Ruths were not invited to the wedding reception, though, to be fair, it was a small party as Fred Lieb, the dean of sportswriters, remembers it. Perhaps Eleanor Gehrig thought Babe and Lou should part? Like Claire, she was a woman of strong will (in a short time she entirely revised Lou's style of dress).

                            Babe and Lou could only be close as long as Lou was fan and Babe was hero. As Babe decayed and Lou became the pride of the Yankees, the relation had to change. Babe became a little envious of Lou. As peers they weren't suited. Lou always wore a coat and tie in the dining car, scolded younger players who looked sloppy in publlic, and, all in all, seemed to become a stuffier man as he became a greater ballplayer. The first private notice of a potential rift came during a rainy-day bridge game in 1932 when Lou and Babe paired against sportswriters. Babe bid wildly, and they lost thirty-three dollars. When Babe left Lou showed anger. He hadn't liked a remark Babe made after going down five tricks - "Jeez, I sure loused that one. I butchered it, like McCarthy handles the pitchers." Lou, a team man, didn't approve of that kind of talk with reporters. But they weren't near breaking yet. In December 1932 Lou took up golf because he wanted "to play with Babe Ruth."

                            Lou signed a magazine article in early 1933 in which he quoted Babe as having said in 1927,"...There's a lot of fun in this thing but money is the thing we're after. It's all over there...behind those fences! That's where the money is. The more balls we hit over the wall, the more world series we'll get. Suppose we forget each other and remember that." (Graceless, if true, but it doesn't ring true; World Series shares were a trivial part of Babe's income.)

                            A kind of counter was Babe's remark to a reporter that Lou was shortening his career by playing every day. Naturally the reporter asked Lou's view. Lou said he was paid to play every day.

                            Thus to the chill between Ruth and McCarthy, and silence between Mrs. Ruth and Mrs. McCarthy, was added a tension between the Ruths and the Gehrigs. Then came a complete break. Dorothy Ruth visited the senior Gehrigs frequently, usually wearing the same favorite clothes. Lou's mother unwisely remarked that Dorothy, Claire's daughter by adoption, wasn't dressed as well as Julia, Claire's daughter by birth. (The Gehrigs certainly had a thing about clothes.) The innuendo traveled from Yankee wife to Yankee wife until it reached and angered Claire, who angered Babe. Using the intermediary in the clubhouse, Babe sent an oral message to Lou: "Never speak to me again off the ball field." On camera they were officially friendly; elsewhere they ignored each other. Ruth had behaved stupidly, and Claire doesn't come out of the scene looking well.


                            ---------------------------------------

                            Creamer -

                            But little things happened. Worst was the feud with Gehrig. Babe had always patronized Lou, never really accepting him as a co-star. Gehrig did not seem to mind and, indeed, was a worshipful admirer of the Babe's for many years. Ruth took Gehrig with him on barnstorming trips and made a great deal of money for the younger player. In 1932, when Ruth and Gehrig and a couple of sportswriters were sitting around talking about the barnstorming days, Ruth said, "Hey, Dutchman, didn't I pay you $9000 for that trip in 1927?" Gehrig nodded. "Wasn't that more money than you made all year from the Yankees?" Gehrig nodded again. Ruth and Gehrig fished and hunted together, went to Army-Notre Dame football games together and for a while Lou was as close to Ruth as any teammate ever was. After the 1929 season RUth proposed to Gehrig that if they presented a united front the club would simply have to pay what they wanted. Gehrig, the well-disciplined son of stricts but loving parents, was scared of the idea and shied away from it. "I don't think so," he said. Ruth was always a bit contemptuous of him after that, as he was of Gehrig's spending habits. Ruth was a big spender and a lavish tipper. Gehrig was frugal, and his modest tipping was famous. As Rosy Ryan said, "Lou was a grand fellow, but a little close. They used to claim he cut his own hair." Someone said that when Ruth and Gehrig were bridge partners, "All you had to do was sit there and let the Babe double to hear Lou cry." Claire Ruth wrote, "Surely Babe was ridiculous when he left a ten-dollar tip where fifty cents would have been generous. But Lou's dimes were just as silly."

                            Ruth loved to go with Gehrig to visit Lou's mother at here home in New Rochelle. Once on a road trip he bought a scraggly little chihuahua pup and brought it home and gave it to her. Mrs. Gehrig named it Jidge, after Babe, and had the dog long after the friendship between the two players was over. Ruth often brought his daughter Dorothy with him when he visited the Gehrigs, and the little girl and Mom Gehrig, as she was universally called, got along fine. Dorothy, according to Claire Ruth, was the innocent reason for the bad feeling that developed between Babe and Lou. She was only eleven or twelve, still a little girl. Julia was five years older, quite tall, a young woman. Julia dressed with great elan, Dorothy scampered around like a tomboy. One day Mom Gehrig, who didn't much like Claire anyway, said to someone, "It's a shame she doesn't dress Dorothy as nicely as she dresses her own daughter." The remark got bad to Claire, who blew her cork. She got mad, which made Ruth mad, and he said something angrily to Gehrig about his mother minding her own business. You didn't knock Mom Gehrig to Lou, who would take her on road trips with him once in a while. The two stopped speaking off the ballfield, their friendship at an end.


                            -----------------------------------

                            Wagenheim -

                            According to Claire, the two men had been "loused up by a flock of gabbing women." Some time before, Claire complained to Babe that she'd been "insulted" by Gehrig's mother during a visit to the Gehrig home in New Rochelle. It seemed that "Mom" Gehrig had remarked that Claire took better care of her own daughter, Julia, than of little Dorothy. When Ruth heard of it, he became upset, mentioned it to Gehrig, and soon the men weren't speaking. There may have been other contributing factors. Although Ruth's career was on the wane and Gehrig's was in full flower, the Babe never regarded Lou as more than a "junior partner," a younger brother. Ruth often kidded the shy, methodical Gehrig. Once on a train, for example, he told the waiter to serve him a "steak a la Gehrig." When the waiter looked befuddled, the Babe, shaking with laughter, said, "You know, good and thick!"

                            The family feud, which came close to splitting the players aboard ship into two factions, was noticed by Connie Mack, who at one time considered Ruth as a candidate to manage the Athletics. Mack told writer Joe Williams that he could never make Ruth his manager because Mrs. Ruth had "too much influence over the Babe" and "would be running the club in a month."

                            Comment


                            • #59
                              Grert articles, Sultan. It seems like a classic personality conflict. I do remember a few years ago watching some old film of Ruth about to cross home plate after a HR and Gehrig turns his back to ruth to throw away his extra bat. Ruth shakes hands with another teammate and doesn't even look at Gehrig. It seemed strange. Of course there could be nothing to this incident.
                              Strikeouts are boring! Besides that, they're fascist. Throw some ground balls - it's more democratic.-Crash Davis

                              Comment


                              • #60
                                The time when Babe/Lou didn't speak was actually only for 1933-34, in playing time, and until 1939 off-field. Before that, they were pretty friendly.

                                Comment

                                Ad Widget

                                Collapse
                                Working...
                                X