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*Babe Ruth Thread*

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  • Originally posted by Nimrod View Post
    I like the story that Herb Pennock told of when he and Ruth were dining with a group that included several women.During the course of the meal,Ruth stood up and said "I got to go piss"!As Ruth was heading for the rest room,Pennock took hold of Ruth`s elbow and said "George,that`s no way to talk in front of women"!The Babe agreed.When they got back to the table,Ruth(with his head hung down)said "I`m sorry that I said `piss`!Pennock almost swallowed his fork.
    Ruth was one of a kind. Singular entity in history. Never will or could be another like him.

    He missed so very much by being sent to St. Mary's....because of his childhood and background, he seemed to need to learn the world almost entirely on his own, especially from 1914 onwards.

    I work in a very indigent community, and with a lot of foster care kids kids, as well as those who basically have to raise themselves. They have "The System" to support them in some ways Babe didn't a century ago, but what they lack in rearing and socialization is glaringly obvious.

    Hence the term, "Out of the mouth of Babe"(s)
    Last edited by csh19792001; 05-30-2012, 08:50 PM.

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    • Don't recall who said it but this says it all about Ruth, great description. "Babe Ruth, he does everything wrong off the field and everything right on the field."

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      • Have never seen Babe's own account dealing with his early life at St. Mary's, here it is.
        Page one, the start is on the right side.
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        • That's a fascinating article. I once read that Ruth played in front of the biggest crowds as though he were playing in front of cows. I.e believe his upbringing, as reflected in the above article, allowed him to have icewater running through his veins while he was on the diamond. Even a pressure-packed situation has to be a million times less stressful than wondering if you are going to get abandoned by your parents over and over again.

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          • Fenway?:






            Ruth's jersey that recently set the all-time sports memorabilia record ($4.4 million, as mentioned above). Actually, the graphic above says $4.4 billion, but who's counting? The jersey is thought to be circa 1920:





            Last edited by SultanOfWhat; 05-31-2012, 10:17 PM.
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            • Babe is the best there ever was, is, or will be. In 1920 54 homers, next closest was 19. In 1921 59 homers, next closest was 24. Enough said. Also, what doesn't get brought up enough, Babe hit .342 lifetime, he would be a sure fire Hall of Famer if he was a singles hitter!

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              • Originally posted by csh19792001 View Post
                I'd love to have been lucky enough to talk to Red Faber. This played played for almost 20 years against Ruth!! 1914-1933 AL! Cobb, Speaker, Ruth, Gehrig, Collins, Joe Jackson.... Can you imagine the stories? Does anyone have quotes from this guy?

                Or, does anyone have quotes or footage/interviews about guys who played with/against Ruth that they'd like to share? I want to know him as people knew him in real life, as a real living, breathing person, not merely a legend and god to us.
                Here are a few.
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                • Originally posted by SHOELESSJOE3 View Post
                  Here are a few.
                  Check out Ruth`s,Schang`s,and the umpire`s eyes in that picture of Ruth smashing out his 3rd homer.It would appear,judging by their gazes,that Ruth has hit an infield pop-up,yet that blast flew out of Shibe.Yikes!

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                  • More comments on Babe. The Pete Rose comment was made before Pete got into trouble with his gambling.So if we asked him now, he would have to say he had "two" great regrets, not seeing the Bam and making a bad choice.
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                    • Originally posted by Nimrod View Post
                      Check out Ruth`s,Schang`s,and the umpire`s eyes in that picture of Ruth smashing out his 3rd homer.It would appear,judging by their gazes,that Ruth has hit an infield pop-up,yet that blast flew out of Shibe.Yikes!
                      His trademark on many of his home runs, hit a mile and a mile high.

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                      • Originally posted by pheasant View Post
                        That's a fascinating article. I once read that Ruth played in front of the biggest crowds as though he were playing in front of cows. I.e believe his upbringing, as reflected in the above article, allowed him to have icewater running through his veins while he was on the diamond. Even a pressure-packed situation has to be a million times less stressful than wondering if you are going to get abandoned by your parents over and over again.
                        I doubt Babe knew the meaning of the word pressure. Look at how cool he was in the 1932 World Series against the Cub's when he homered off of Charlie Root. Acknowledging the first and second called strikes with one finger than two fingers. Then raising one finger and yelling to the Cub bench........."it only takes one" words backed up by Cub catcher Hartnett.
                        Two strikes down and still shooting off his mouth, on the big stage the WS, then he hits one almost to the corner of Sheffield and Waveland Avenue.

                        You don't hear much about his three homer game against the Cardinals in the 1928 World Series, the Quick pitch" again he is so cool. Cards with two strikes on Babe, Sherdel throws the quick pitch for what they believe to be strike three. Umpire does not allow that, legal in the NL it was agreed it would not be used in the WS. Cards are irate all over the ump. Ruth adds fire to the situation by walking to the mound, laughing, clapping his hands in mock applause at the Cards. Order is restored, Card pitcher Sherdel and Babe still yelling at each other. Sherdel throws two pitches for a ball, then Ruth hits one on top of the pavillion in right center field.
                        I think the only time Babe felt any pressure was when he downed a half dozen or more hot dogs and some sodas.On the field no matter what the situation, it was all a game to him, lets have some fun.

                        Here we see him walking back to home plate just before the home run. after giving it to the Cards.
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                        • Fantastic stuff here, Joe. As always from you on The Babe.

                          You're right about pressure. I don't think much stressed Ruth like it does other people, and I don't think he "took things hard" (even life's hardships). I don't know hardly any stories of him getting angry and blowing his top, either. Do you know of any offhand? How about fights? I read about a fight Cobb started with him and Gehrig, but I have read little about his hostility, even with the divorce and through other tribulations.

                          He seemed to be a person that lived very much in the moment. It's both a wonderful blessing and a terrible curse to have that disposition and mindset, depending on luck and the circumstance(s) in one's life.

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                          • Originally posted by csh19792001 View Post
                            Fantastic stuff here, Joe. As always from you on The Babe.

                            You're right about pressure. I don't think much stressed Ruth like it does other people, and I don't think he "took things hard" (even life's hardships). I don't know hardly any stories of him getting angry and blowing his top, either. Do you know of any offhand? How about fights? I read about a fight Cobb started with him and Gehrig, but I have read little about his hostility, even with the divorce and through other tribulations.

                            He seemed to be a person that lived very much in the moment. It's both a wonderful blessing and a terrible curse to have that disposition and mindset, depending on luck and the circumstance(s) in one's life.
                            I did once read something about the fight you mention where Gehrig was also involved. So long ago don't recall the details but if I recall it was some pushing and shoving, not really a fight.

                            Here is one face off between Babe and Ty, no punches thrown. Some where I have another article, Babe pitching, a base hit with Ty on base.Ty seeing no one was covering third base, rounds second breaks for third. Babe off the mound and raced to third, tagged Ty out. Thats not the whole story. Intentional or not, we don't know, Babe slapped a hard tag into Ty's midsection. Ty lay prone for a period of time, refusing to be helped to his feet. If I find that article, Babe's tag on Ty, I will post it.

                            This game took place June 12 and appeared in the Globe on the 13th.
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                            Last edited by SHOELESSJOE3; 06-01-2012, 06:07 PM.

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                            • Ruth still a bit angry asked to pitch against the Tigers the very next day, possible to set up a one on one with Cobb.
                              He pitched one game in 1920, June 2, a year ago.
                              He pitched 5 innings gave up 5 hits and 4 runs hit 2 home runs, Yanks win 13-8.. Cobb got no hits off of Babe, not sure how he made out before the 5th inning.
                              But it was evident he wanted to face Cobb. After striking out Ty in the 5th inning, he left the mound for centerfield.
                              Two home runs to center, never reached before. This was the old Polo Grounds, 433 feet to center.
                              I think over his career Ty hit Babe pretty good, just like he treated most pitchers, maybe .340.360.
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                              • Take that Babe.............Ty has his day.
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