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*Babe Ruth Thread*

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  • Nice photo. I have a 35" Babe Ruth Model that I purchased from H&B. I sure wish they made a facsimile of that 36" fifty-four ounce monster.

    Originally posted by Nimrod View Post
    The Babe even experimented with using this Hack Wilson style bat in the early 30s.Note the handle is straight,does not flare into the knob.[ATTACH]121416
    ". . . the Ruth, the whole Ruth and nothing but the Ruth . . ."

    Comment


    • Originally posted by Badge714 View Post
      Nice photo. I have a 35" Babe Ruth Model that I purchased from H&B. I sure wish they made a facsimile of that 36" fifty-four ounce monster.
      They do,but it won`t fit in your and anybody`s house!LOL.[ATTACH]
      Attached Files

      Comment


      • Originally posted by Sultan_1895-1948
        Fenway a great hitters park for lefties? Since when?

        Ruth never got to experience the Fenway Williams enjoyed. They shorted the RC field fence by about 30 feet and center by about 100 feet. I would actually challenge you to find any lefty, who hit with the dimensions Ruth faced, that produced better slugging numbers in Fenway

        Maybe we should post the field layout differences to put it into perspective. My guess...if Williams had to hit in Ruth's Fenway, his average drops 30 points, and he loses about 70 home homers...just a guess though.
        I thought it was common knowledge that the Fenway Park that Ruth played in was the size of a national park. From 1914...

        Fenway-park-1914-world-series-braves.jpg
        Strikeouts are boring! Besides that, they're fascist. Throw some ground balls - it's more democratic.-Crash Davis

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        • Fenway over the years. I see more than a few changes in dimensions of only couple or few feet.
          My guess, no actual changes in the dimension on those so small. Probably remeasured and a different figure arrived at.

          There is another later park diagram at Clem's parks.
          One look at the configuration on the right side explains why so many "left handed" Bosox hit so many more doubles at home, they didn't need the wall.
          Over the years I've heard a few opposing team players speak about the area from the line to deep right center, difficult to run down drives.
          Attached Files

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          • Yeah, a good one! Smelser has a photo of the bat he used in 1920 (page 186 of paperback). It's next to a photo of Cobb's bat which was 34 & 1/2" in length and weighing 36 ounces. Ruth's bat in the photo must be at least 36" in length. It has a very gradual taper toward the handle, certainly less of a taper than modern bats. Smelser: "Ruth's heaviest useful bat weighed 47 ounces. In 1920 he ordered several bats that weighed 54 ounces - for reasons unknown - but never repeated the order. . . . In 1920 Ruth's usual bat weighed 44 ounces and was 35 inches long." Hard to believe he could get around on a fast ball with such a large bat, but he most certainly did, hitting fifty-four home runs (twenty-nine at home and twenty-five on the road). Fifty-eight percent of his hits were for extra bases. He had 150 bases on balls and was hit three times. That's 153 passes. He had 136 RBIs. Smelser notes that he would have eclipsed Cobb's 1911 record of 144 had he not had so many free passes.

            Originally posted by Nimrod View Post
            They do,but it won`t fit in your and anybody`s house!LOL.[ATTACH]
            ". . . the Ruth, the whole Ruth and nothing but the Ruth . . ."

            Comment


            • Originally posted by Sultan_1895-1948
              [ATTACH]121517[/ATTACH]
              http://www.baseball-fever.com/showth...00#post2128000

              Going through box scores on BBref...

              Looks Gehrig batted 3rd, in front of Ruth in 1926, up until the 2nd game of double header on 9/3/26. That's when Gehrig was put behind Ruth in lineup for the first time, and stayed there.
              Babe could have been #4!
              "No matter how great you were once upon a time — the years go by, and men forget,” - W. A. Phelon in Baseball Magazine in 1915. “Ross Barnes, forty years ago, was as great as Cobb or Wagner ever dared to be. Had scores been kept then as now, he would have seemed incomparably marvelous.”

              Comment


              • Nice work, Sultan. I guess Ruth hit junkballers too. I don't believe that anyone was going to stop him over time. Granted, Hub Pruett stopped him in the beginning. But Ruth eventually figured out that screwball. I remember vividly when Fernando Valenzuela used his screwball to rack up an 9-0 record vs the NL with an era way south of 1.00. Enventually, he got figured out. But Valenzuela literally made hitters look like little leaguers for about 2 months.

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                • Thse newspapers are really not much help, little details in game accounts, now and then they give innings hits came in.
                  All I could find
                  6-13-1918 Ruth's single came in 7th off of Cicotte, did Babe bat after that, don't know.
                  7-13-1919, Ruth triple in 6th and singled in 7th. Can't say if he faced Cicotte in last two innings, probably not.
                  8-14-1919 Single in 6th, HR in 7th.
                  7-17-1920 no details per inning.

                  Comment


                  • Originally posted by Sultan_1895-1948
                    Thank you. Would you care to do work on Cicotte or Faber? You can just do the known CG for now, and the known within the non-CG.
                    I can do that.

                    I'll keep you posted.

                    Comment


                    • Yes, that's basically what I referenced.
                      ". . . the Ruth, the whole Ruth and nothing but the Ruth . . ."

                      Comment


                      • Yes, that's basically what I referenced. Smelser's book is a gem. I consider it one of the greatest sports bios ever. I especially like how he presents Ruth, warts and all. All too human, he! There was that life long struggle between the Baltimore waterfront lout and the Ruth of St. Mary's when under the eye of Father Mathias.
                        ". . . the Ruth, the whole Ruth and nothing but the Ruth . . ."

                        Comment


                        • Originally posted by Badge714 View Post
                          Yes, that's basically what I referenced. Smelser's book is a gem. I consider it one of the greatest sports bios ever. I especially like how he presents Ruth, warts and all. All too human, he! There was that life long struggle between the Baltimore waterfront lout and the Ruth of St. Mary's when under the eye of Father Mathias.
                          I consider it the best book on the Babe. More than a bio like the rest, some numbers in it stats, little clips from news archives and loads of comments on Babe, by teammates and others.
                          Now, The Babe In Red Stockings, Babe from the mound, these guys did a real job on this one, great book, covers Babe's pitching like no other book.

                          Comment


                          • Originally posted by Sultan_1895-1948
                            Shoeless (or anyone else with historical article access),

                            Need to see how many accounts we can get of this game (from 1917)

                            The Babe in Red Stockings….

                            “Back in the friendlier confines of Fenway Park, Ruth cruised to an easy 11-2 win over St. Louis in the first game of a double header on July 26. He shined in all phases of the game, going 2 for 3 with a sacrifice bunt, and his five fielding assists drew rave reviews from the Post’s Arthur Duffey regarding his glovework. There was also very nearly a fight between Ruth and Browns’ shortstop John Lavan, who after a close pitch thought Babe was trying to bean him. Lavan threw his bat at the mound, but no punches were thrown, and the two later shook hands."
                            Once again, checked 3 newspapers, no comment on Babe's 5 assists. But, he actually did hit Lanvan.
                            Attached Files

                            Comment


                            • Originally posted by Sultan_1895-1948
                              Ok sorry, didn't see that. Thanks for checkin'. Sorta extreme reaction by Lavan. I looked at several games after and he started each one. Guess he didn't get suspended. Probably had somethin' to do with Ruth's gentle reaction. Could have blown up big time if he took great offense. Seems players got suspended back then for a lot less.
                              They did a lot crazier too though. Punching umpires in the face, for example.
                              "No matter how great you were once upon a time — the years go by, and men forget,” - W. A. Phelon in Baseball Magazine in 1915. “Ross Barnes, forty years ago, was as great as Cobb or Wagner ever dared to be. Had scores been kept then as now, he would have seemed incomparably marvelous.”

                              Comment


                              • I can't get the image to copy but that picture of Ruth when he is 7-8 [in my avatar by my username] with the other kid holding the bat, did he stay friends or keep in contact with that guy? I was thinking wow. This guy is in one of the only photo's [THE only?] of Ruth as a child and probably doesn't even know it. But then I read in Sultan's caption his name is John DeTullio.
                                Last edited by bluesky5; 03-09-2013, 11:33 PM.
                                "No matter how great you were once upon a time — the years go by, and men forget,” - W. A. Phelon in Baseball Magazine in 1915. “Ross Barnes, forty years ago, was as great as Cobb or Wagner ever dared to be. Had scores been kept then as now, he would have seemed incomparably marvelous.”

                                Comment

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