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Dom Dimaggio

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  • Dom Dimaggio

    Overlooked due to his magnificent brother but still hit 298 drove in 1067 runs and hit 247 home runs
    puts him squarely in the top 250

  • #2
    Originally posted by joshfan View Post
    Overlooked due to his magnificent brother but still hit 298 drove in 1067 runs and hit 247 home runs
    puts him squarely in the top 250
    Actually, he only hit 87 home runs but he was a very good player and arguably one of the top 30 CF's all time. He was a better defensive CF than Joe and one of the best of all time.
    "Hitting is better than sex." - Reggie Jackson, Esquire (March 1, 1978)

    Comment


    • #3
      Dom deserves a little serious discussion before this tread gets closed too, so here goes.

      When you account for what he probably lost to WW2, he should be a Hall of Famer. His two best years were 1942 and 1946, and he missed all of 1943-1945, so he probably lost most of his peak.

      And he was still a good player when he retired due to his difficulties with Boudreau.

      And he only drove in 618 runs, but I'm sure you knew that. You should relook at his career Joshfan, you might end up with a little more respect for him.

      Comment


      • #4
        --A thread discusssing Dom DiMaggio has no reason to be closed. Another thread mocking ranking threads we didn't need.

        Comment


        • #5
          Dominic Paul DiMaggio:

          Born: February 12, 1917, San Francisco, CA
          Died: May 8, 2009, Boston, MA, age 92,---d. at home, surrounded by his family.

          Bats: Right , Throws: Right
          Height: 5' 9" , Weight: 168 lb.
          Debut: April 16, 1940
          Final Game: May 9, 1953

          Relative Stats:
          Rel.BA---Rel.OnB---Rel.Slg.---Plate Appearances---BB Ref

          ---1.07-----1.06------1.03--------6,478


          --------------------1946: Charley Kelly, Dom, Ted Williams, Jim Vernon-------------------------------------March 7, 1940: Dom, Jimmy Foxx, Ted Williams

          2002: Fenway Park with Johnny Peskey,----1st pitch, Game 5, 2003 championship serieds w/Yankees, October 14



          ----------------------------------------------------------------------------September 6, 1946: Wally Moses, Ted Williams, Dom DiMaggio.------------Dom, brother Joe DiMaggio

          Joe, his Mom and brother Dom. 1940


          Obituary:
          By Mark Pratt/Associated Press
          GateHouse News Service
          Posted May 08, 2009 @ 10:37 AM
          Last update May 08, 2009 @ 10:39 AM

          --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
          BOSTON — Dominic DiMaggio, the bespectacled Boston Red Sox center fielder who was overshadowed by his older brother Joe's spectacular career, died early today. He was 92.

          Wake and funeral arrangements are pending, but will be held at St. Paul's Church in Wellesley.

          DiMaggio was surrounded by his family at his death at his Massachusetts home, according to his wife, Emily. She did not give a cause of death but said that DiMaggio had been ill lately.

          ``He was the most wonderful, warm, loving man,'' his wife of 61 years said. ``He adored his children, and we all adored him.''

          DiMaggio was a seven-time baseball All Star who still holds the record for the longest consecutive game hitting streak in Red Sox history.

          Known as the ``Little Professor'' because of his eyeglasses and 5-foot-9, 168-pound frame, DiMaggio hit safely in 34 consecutive games in 1949. The streak was broken on Aug. 9 when his big brother caught a sinking line drive in the eighth inning of a 6-3 Red Sox win over the New York Yankees.

          The younger DiMaggio also had a 27-game hitting streak in 1951, which still ranks as the fifth longest in Red Sox history. Joe set the major league record with a 56-game hitting streak with the Yankees in 1941 and was elected to the sport's Hall of Fame.

          The oldest of the three center field-playing DiMaggio brothers was Vince, who had a 10-year major league career with five National League teams. Joe died in March 1999, while Vince died in October 1986.

          Dom DiMaggio spent his entire career with the Red Sox, 10 full seasons plus three games in 1953. He was teammates and close friends with Red Sox greats Ted Williams, Bobby Doerr and Johnny Pesky.

          While Dom did not have the batting numbers of Joe, he was generally regarded as a better defensive player with a stronger arm.

          He was a career .298 hitter with 87 home runs, while Joe was a .325 career hitter with 361 homers. Dom's baseball career was interrupted for three years (1943-45) by World War II when he served in the Navy, a military obligation that may have cost him induction into the Hall of Fame.

          On June 30, 1950, Dom and Joe DiMaggio homered in the same game, the first time brothers had hit homers in the same game in the majors in 15 years. They played in the outfield together in three All-Star games.

          Dom played a pivotal role in Game 7 of the 1946 World Series against the St. Louis Cardinals, a heartbreaker for Boston fans. He batted in two runs in the eighth inning to tie the game at 3, but he injured his leg while running the bases and was replaced in center field by Leon Culberson for the ninth.

          It was Culberson who fielded Harry Walker's double and threw it to Pesky during Enos Slaughter's famous ``Mad Dash'' from first to home that won the game for the Cardinals.

          Many argued that if DiMaggio had still been in center he would have handled the play better and prevented Slaughter from scoring.

          After the Red Sox finally won the World Series in 2004, their first since 1918, DiMaggio, Pesky and Doerr were on hand on opening day 2005 to raise the championship banner at Fenway Park.

          DiMaggio grew up in San Francisco, one of nine children born to Sicilian immigrants. His mother was a teacher and his father was a fisherman. He is survived by his wife and three children, Dominic Paul, Peter and Emily.
          Last edited by Bill Burgess; 04-25-2010, 11:29 PM.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by leecemark View Post
            --A thread discussing Dom DiMaggio has no reason to be closed. Another thread mocking ranking threads we didn't need.
            I second this opinion. All players deserve respect. Some of my favorite players do not generally find agreement with the house.

            I like Bill Lange, Herman Long, Jimmy Ryan, George Gore, Jimmy McAleer and a lot of others whom others don't necessarily favor. But we can all agree that everyone deserves respect.

            Just making the MLs is a tough achievement. Most of us lack that potential. So, I urge us all to give some acknowledgment to simply making the MLs. And that goes for the Bill Bergen, Doc Bushongs, etc. They made the Big Time. I never did. I never had near the potential.

            Comment


            • #7
              Dom had a chance to be a hall of famer without the wartime loss-both sabermetrically and traditionally.

              Traditionally, he probably would have had 2200 hits and been a little over .300 with the 3 war years, and he was regarded as a great fielder and baserunner.

              Saber-wise, he was a great all time defensive centerfielder (probably top 10) with a 1.07 relative on-base percentage, and 111 OPS+ which is in Ashburn territory.

              The career is a little short in both cases (project about 1800 games). Any explanation of the sudden decline in '53? Also what did he do in the war?

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by brett View Post
                Dom had a chance to be a hall of famer without the wartime loss-both sabermetrically and traditionally.

                Traditionally, he probably would have had 2200 hits and been a little over .300 with the 3 war years, and he was regarded as a great fielder and baserunner.

                Saber-wise, he was a great all time defensive centerfielder (probably top 10) with a 1.07 relative on-base percentage, and 111 OPS+ which is in Ashburn territory.

                The career is a little short in both cases (project about 1800 games). Any explanation of the sudden decline in '53? Also what did he do in the war?
                Yeah, I kind of always saw DiMaggio as Ashburn-Lite with a shorter career.
                "Hitting is better than sex." - Reggie Jackson, Esquire (March 1, 1978)

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by brett View Post
                  The career is a little short in both cases (project about 1800 games). Any explanation of the sudden decline in '53? Also what did he do in the war?
                  Regarding '53...Boudreau, who was managing the Sox at the time, thought Dom had slowed down in the field in 1952 and so decided to replace him in CF in 1953. Dom wasn't willing to be a bench player, so he decided to just retire.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I'm gonna say, sure, a terrific player for some time. But Richie Ashburn is pretty much the cutoff of center fielders for me and DiMaggio is just a notch below that level.
                    Originally posted by Cougar
                    "Read at your own risk. Baseball Fever shall not be responsible if you become clinically insane trying to make sense of this post. People under 18 must read in the presence of a parent, guardian, licensed professional, or Dr. Phil."

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Even insinuating that Dom DiMaggio was a joke is in and of itself a joke from someone who does not understand baseball. Dom had a great career and I definitely don't think it is out of place to rank him somewhere in the 300s all time. He was a defensive wiz and a great overall player.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        The Dimaggio brothers sure knew how to play the outfield.
                        They were before my time and in the case of Joe; his hitting is pretty well gone over.
                        But....mewonders...

                        What exactly made them such good outfielders? Range? reading the wind? Placement? Reading the ball off the bat?

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Iowanic View Post
                          The Dimaggio brothers sure knew how to play the outfield.
                          They were before my time and in the case of Joe; his hitting is pretty well gone over.
                          But....mewonders...

                          What exactly made them such good outfielders? Range? reading the wind? Placement? Reading the ball off the bat?
                          I saw all three DiMaggio brothers play. The best defender was Dom, who often resembled an infielder before each pitch - kind of crouched with his mitt and bare hands at knees and slightly facing the LF - RF side where he anticipated the ball to be hit. He had a magnificent jump at the crack of the bat and ran flawless routes to the ball. His effective range was awesome. He had a good accurate arm.

                          Joe similarly had the quick reflexes; and his long stately strides made his coverage of the CF zone look more effortless than Dom all-out dashes. It was said of Joe that "he made the hard ones look easy." Joe's effective range was no quite so wide as Dom's. Joe had a strong arm, but Dom's was more accurate.

                          Vince, the oldest of the three was right up there with Dom as far as effective range; and he had a gliding movement more like Joe's in covering ground. Vince was a superb defender; and of the three brothers, he had the best arm. If Vince deserved recognition among elites, it would be for his arm. He had a cannon and it was accurate. Any list of OF rifles would have to have Vince DiMaggio mentioned prominently.

                          Vince lacked the batting eye and disciplines of Joe and Dom. He was a freer swinger with less consistency in effective contact.
                          Last edited by leewileyfan; 04-26-2010, 05:47 PM.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Watching over big brother.
                            1940 Joe had a hitting streak of 23 games in the month of July, then hitless for the next two games.
                            He then went on another streak of 9 games. That ended on August 14, also hitless on August 15 against the Bosox.
                            How the streak was ended.
                            Attached Files

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              1949 Dom Dimaggio puts together the longest consecutive hitting streak for a Red Sox, 34 games.
                              It ended at Fenway on August 9, his last at bat he lined out to brother Joe.

                              Dom recalled how he thought he had another game on that streak. A bullet line drive low enough to skim Yankee pitcher Vic Raschi's head, he recalled Vic ducking to get out of the way.
                              Never that high off the ground, the ball carried and Joe never had to take a step, it was hit right to him.

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