Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Jimmie Dykes

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Jimmie Dykes

    I thought I'd create a Jimmie Dykes thread, just because I like him, he doesn't have one already, and he gave a very great number of years to baseball. He made the game better.

    James Joseph Dykes---AKA Jimmie Dykes:

    Born: November 10, 1896, Philadelphia, PA
    Died: June 15, 1976, Philadelphia, PA, age 79, Buried at St. Dennis Cemetery, Havaertown, PA

    Philadelphia Athletics 2B, 1918-32
    Chicago White Sox 3B, 1933-39

    Managing History:

    Chicago White Sox, 1934 - 1946
    Philadelphia Athletics, 1951 -1953
    Baltimore Orioles, 1954
    Cincinnati Reds, 1958
    Detroit Tigers, 1959 - 1960
    Cleveland Indians, 1960 - 1961
    -----------------------------------------
    Coaching History:

    Philadelphia Athletics, 1949 - 1950
    Cincinnati Reds, 1955 - 1958
    Pittsburgh Pirates, 1959
    Milwaukee Braves, 1962
    Kansas City Athletics, 1963 - 1964

    Traveling salesman. Came in 3rd or above only 3 times in all his years, proving even good managers require good players to win.

    ---------------During his tenure as A's Manager, 1951-53.--------Managing Record


    --------White Sox skipper, 1939-44--------------------------------A's Manager in 1951


    ----------------Tigers' skipper, 1959-60.-------------------------------------------September, 1952.----------------------------------------1951.


    Jimmy Dykes, Philadelphia A's IF, 1924-27---BB Ref


    Spring training, April 4, 1921, Mobile, Alabama.


    Spring training, March 14, 1921, Lake Charles, Louisiana.---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 1929 World Series.


    --------------------1934-38-------------------------Saint Denis Cemetery, Haverton, PA

    1940: Jimmie Dykes/Fred Haney in Chicago.------------------------------------------------------------------1934: Jimmie Dykes, Al Simmons, Mule Haas march into Comiskey Park.

    Last edited by Bill Burgess; 01-20-2012, 04:23 AM.

  • #2
    In 1967, Jimmie published his autobiography, 'You Can't Steal First Base', as told to Charles O. Dexter. Here is the cover.

    Charles Dexter's real name was Louis Levenson. He died June 14, 1969, in the Bronx, NY. He had been a sports columnist for
    the New York Daily Worker, and had also collaborated with Ralph Houk on "Basseball Players are Human, Too."


    February 3, 1935, Hotel Comodore, NYC: Bucky Harris, Connie Mack, Jimmie Dykes.
    New York sports writers' annual dinner.------------------------------------------------------------March 15, 1941: Jimmie Dykes Day. His last day as an active player.
    -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Jimmie Dykes/ Dan Daniel, New York sports writer.



    June 6, 1954: With Bob Kennedy and catcher, Clint Courtney.


    June, 1954: With Joe Coleman.
    Last edited by Bill Burgess; 06-05-2011, 02:02 PM.

    Comment


    • #3
      Not to complain or argue, but just out of curiosity, why is Jimmy Dykes a favorite of yours, Bill?
      “Money, money, money; that is the article I am looking after now more than anything else. It is the only thing that will shape my course (‘religion is nowhere’).” - Ross Barnes

      Comment


      • #4
        Because he gave his entire life to try to make baseball better. OK, he might not have been a star player, or even an elite manager, but what he had, he contributed.

        There are a number of people like him who never received the credit they deserved. Billy Southworth, Bill McKecknie, Jimmy Burke, Burt Shotton, Dan Howley, Art Fletcher, and a whole lot more.

        Don't get me wrong, Beady. I am fully aware that many others gave their entire lives to baseball, too. But it seems to me that some have had their fame last the years, while others' fame faded even before they died.

        Billy Martin, Leo Durocher, Bucky Harris, Casey Stengel, Al Lopez, Walt Alston, Earl Weaver, Sparky Anderson will live forever in the pages of baseball lore. But who today remembers Dykes, Southworth or McKechnie? Only the more avid baseball historians, like here on Fever.

        So, if I get my chance to pump a righteous fist for some worthy, forgotten hero, I take my shots. For exactly the same reasons I shake vigorous fists for Buck Ewing, King Kelly, Jimmy McAleer, Bill Lange, George Gore, Jimmy Ryan and George Sisler.
        Last edited by Bill Burgess; 07-18-2011, 07:54 PM.

        Comment


        • #5
          It's certainly true that Dykes was a very well known figure forty years ago who is very little remembered today.
          “Money, money, money; that is the article I am looking after now more than anything else. It is the only thing that will shape my course (‘religion is nowhere’).” - Ross Barnes

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Bill Burgess View Post
            In 1967, Jimmie published his autobiography, 'You Can't Steal First Base', as told to Charles O. Dexter. ...
            Charles Dexter's real name was Louis Levenson. He died June 14, 1969, in the Bronx, NY. He had been a sports columnist for the New York
            Daily Worker, and had also collaborated with Ralph Houk on "Basseball Players are Human, Too."]
            Did he write baseball books as Charles Dexter because he wrote for the Daily Worker as Louis Levenson and that name would hurt a baseball book?

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Paul Wendt View Post
              Did he write baseball books as Charles Dexter because he wrote for the Daily Worker as Louis Levenson and that name would hurt a baseball book?
              I really couldn't say. I just don't know.

              Comment


              • #8
                The Best Compliment Jimmie Dykes Ever Got

                "When I broke in, Ty Cobb was respected for his hitting and feared for his slashing base-running. I was feeling my oats in '22 when he came to town with his Tigers and I decided to stop his tearing around the sacks. I was playing second when he came flying into my base, spikes high. I called time and told Ed Rommel, who had a good pick-off motion, to throw to me on a count of five.

                Ty took a long lead. On the five-count Rommel whirled and threw to me. I interposed my knee between Ty and the bag. "Out!" cried the umpire. It was the sweetest word I ever heard. Ty's face was purple.

                "Wanta go to the hospital?" he snarled. "You cut me and you'll go too!" I snarled back.

                He meekly retired from the scene.

                Like many other players of those days Ty had a pet superstition. Whenever he came in from left field he would go out of his way to step on second base. I noticed this habit and decided to break it. For three innings I ran from the bench and stood on the bag, blocking him off. After the fourth inning he came glaring at me and gave me the hip. I hipped him back. His fists were clenched and I thought we might come to blows. Suddenly he laughed. "I guess I don't need any help to beat this lousy club of yours," he said. "I'll get my hits today just the same."

                That day he got three of the 4,191 hits he made in his lifetime. He could say it with his bat, superstition or not.

                Ty must have liked my standing up to him. Mr. Mack told me that in 1925 he had tried to buy me for his Tigers for the enormous sum of $50,000 but Mr. Mack had refused to sell me. It was a great compliment to me from a great star." (You Can't Steal First Base, by Jimmie Dykes and Charles O. Dexter, 1967, pp. 54-55.)
                Last edited by Bill Burgess; 01-20-2012, 04:31 AM.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Dykes was a classic umpire baiter and the answer to the trivia question... who replaced Connie Mack as manager of the Athletics after fifty years of service?
                  Your Second Base Coach
                  Garvey, Lopes, Russell, and Cey started 833 times and the Dodgers went 498-335, for a .598 winning percentage. That’s equal to a team going 97-65 over a season. On those occasions when at least one of them missed his start, the Dodgers were 306-267-1, which is a .534 clip. That works out to a team going 87-75. So having all four of them added 10 wins to the Dodgers per year.
                  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p5hCIvMule0

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Jimmie Dykes deserves to be remembered - I don't know why known idiots like Charlie Dressen get remembered better than good guys like Dykes.
                    Originally posted by Cougar
                    "Read at your own risk. Baseball Fever shall not be responsible if you become clinically insane trying to make sense of this post. People under 18 must read in the presence of a parent, guardian, licensed professional, or Dr. Phil."

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Dykes was indeed a legendary umpire baiter. Two stories. One, from Babe Pinelli's autobiography: in his first spring training as an NL umpire, Pinelli took a daily blistering from Dykes. Just brutal, he said. And later, Dykes praised him and treated him with great respect.

                      The other is that when Dykes managed the White Sox, Bing Miller was one of his coaches and had a foghorn voice. One day, Miller boomed out, "Who, oh, who, was that major league umpire I saw you with last night," and the whole bench replied, "That was no umpire, that was Red Jones!" Jones was not amused.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I bet Jimmy Dykes has some stories, I never realized how long he was involved with baseball. does he have a autobiography? congrats to me on my 500th-- didnt notice that til after i posted
                        "(Shoeless Joe Jackson's fall from grace is one of the real tragedies of baseball. I always thought he was more sinned against than sinning." -- Connie Mack

                        "I have the ultimate respect for Whitesox fans. They were as miserable as the Cubs and Redsox fans ever were but always had the good decency to keep it to themselves. And when they finally won the World Series, they celebrated without annoying every other fan in the country."--Jim Caple, ESPN (Jan. 12, 2011)

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by chicagowhitesox1173 View Post
                          does he have a autobiography?
                          A most careful perusal/examination of post 2 might your answer lie in.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            thx I didnt notice that #2 post, I usually just look at the photos but I did just order the book on amazon for 2 dollars and 33 cents. I knew he played for a long time but never realized how long he managed.
                            "(Shoeless Joe Jackson's fall from grace is one of the real tragedies of baseball. I always thought he was more sinned against than sinning." -- Connie Mack

                            "I have the ultimate respect for Whitesox fans. They were as miserable as the Cubs and Redsox fans ever were but always had the good decency to keep it to themselves. And when they finally won the World Series, they celebrated without annoying every other fan in the country."--Jim Caple, ESPN (Jan. 12, 2011)

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by nerfan View Post
                              Jimmie Dykes deserves to be remembered - I don't know why known idiots like Charlie Dressen get remembered better than good guys like Dykes.
                              Two words: Brooklyn Dodgers.
                              They call me Mr. Baseball. Not because of my love for the game; because of all the stitches in my head.

                              Comment

                              Ad Widget

                              Collapse
                              Working...
                              X