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returned players 1903

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  • returned players 1903

    I'm reading a fine book called 'Total Ballclubs' which examines the story of every major league team since 1876. In this book, the author asserts that as a result of the peace agreement between the leagues, Matthewson had to return from the Browns to the Giants and Vic Willis from the Red Sox to the Braves. Were there others that had to go back after jumping? How would these players have impacted the franchises they jumped to?

  • #2
    the leagues reached agreement on 1/10/1903 - The baseball war was over. Each league would now respect the other’s player contracts, adopt the reserve clause, play under uniform rules and sign the National Agreement.

    a part of the negotiations (and actually the biggest sticking point) was the assigning of disputed player rights. McGraw, for one, was incensed when Ed Delahanty was sent to the Washington Nationals and not his club.

    there were other players assigned as well - file is too large to display but if you go to proquest and search for ban johnson on 1/11/1903 the boston globe article has a long list of assignments

    Another consequence of the armistice was the eventual slashing of salaries and a reneging of promises made to the players’ union in early 1901 by both the American and National Leagues

    pm me and i can email it to you
    Last edited by Brian McKenna; 04-28-2006, 11:05 AM.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by bkmckenna
      the leagues reached agreement on 1/10/1903 - The baseball war was over.
      Bk-
      What percentage of Major Leaguers from 1900 went to the American League in 1901, and what pecent stayed in the senior circuit?

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      • #4
        In all, 111 of the 182 players on American League rosters in 1901 were former National Leaguers

        but some of those 111 weren't on nl rosters in 1900 - they came from the minors - many were on al rosters in 1900 - for example the core of the 1901 White Sox was returnees. First baseman Frank Isbell, shortstop Frank Shugart, third baseman Fred Hartman, center fielder Dummy Hoy, left fielder Herm McFarland, as well as, pitchers Roy Patterson and Jack Katoll worked for Comiskey in 1900

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        • #5
          Originally posted by bkmckenna
          In all, 111 of the 182 players on American League rosters in 1901 were former National Leaguers

          but some of those 111 weren't on nl rosters in 1900 - they came from the minors - many were on al rosters in 1900 - for example the core of the 1901 White Sox was returnees. First baseman Frank Isbell, shortstop Frank Shugart, third baseman Fred Hartman, center fielder Dummy Hoy, left fielder Herm McFarland, as well as, pitchers Roy Patterson and Jack Katoll worked for Comiskey in 1900
          What do you think about the disparity in league strength with the 1901-04 AL vs. the NL? Do you think the AL was appreciably stronger? MUCH stronger?

          Another question- how much stronger do you estimate the 1900 National League was in comparison to the AL and NL of the ensuing years?

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          • #6
            Did any Pirates jump to the AL? I recall reading that Barney Dreyfuss was the only NL owner to reach an agreement with the AL, and thus was not raided. It doesn't look like the Pirates lost anyone of substance between 1900 and 1901. The Pirates look like they dominated the NL during the war between the leagues.

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            • #7
              --The Pirates fended off the first wave of raiding (and dominated a depleted NL), but ended up losing pitchers Jesse Tannehill and Jack Chesbro.

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              • #8
                dreyfuss paid his players well and had a decent relationship with them - when griffith went to carnegie, penn. to entice honus wagner in february 1901 wagner hid at a friend's house (or hotel) because he knew griffith would talk him into jumping

                this is an amusing quote by comiskey after hearing dreyfuss complain about the attempt to sign wagner "“Wouldn’t that make a brass statue laugh, to see big Hans running to little Barney with tears on his cheeks begging him to keep a 110-pounder like Griffith from kidnapping him?”

                after mcgraw decimated the baltimore franchise in mid 1902 griffith clipped the pirates for pitchers Jack Chesbro and Jesse Tannehill, catcher Jack O’Connor, third baseman Wid Conroy and outfielder Lefty Davis

                part of the american league's threats that led to the peace agreement in 1903 involved entering the pittsburgh territory - they used that as a bargaining chip to get into new york

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