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Faster Games Helped Stamina?

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  • Tyrus4189Cobb
    replied
    Originally posted by SHOELESSJOE3 View Post
    Makes some sense but could that be negated some by conditions of the game back then.
    Much heavier uniforms and all day games.
    Plausible, but that's more of an overall drain, like hopping on trains to get from one city to another before commercial piloting. You would sweat more causing more water loss, yet I don't think that factors into the pace as much, especially because water can be replenished during innings you aren't pitching (which came faster because of the reasons we've outlined).

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  • SHOELESSJOE3
    replied
    Originally posted by Tyrus4189Cobb View Post
    I've been toying with the possibility that the quicker games of the deadball era (and in general up until the 1990s) helped pitchers' stamina. Games were faster paced because of less changing of balls, nonsense at the plate, and quicker intervals of the pitcher being ready. If you work out, or even throw a baseball, a nice pace puts a strain on your arm, but you won't really feel fatigued until after the workout. Given this, is it possible that pitchers could last longer because there was less time for fatigue to settle in? They would keep up a quick pace before their arms got sore?

    Modern pitchers get a bum rap about not being able to go past the sixth inning or 100 pitches. Would pitchers of yesteryear have the same difficulties in this era?
    Makes some sense but could that be negated some by conditions of the game back then.
    Much heavier uniforms and all day games.
    Imagine playing every game during the heat of day, no night games. I saw a poll some years ago, maybe the 1970s and by a wide margin players chose night over day games, night games not as big a drain on the body.

    Not to say the longer games today do not factor in but playing all day games years ago probably evens things out some.
    As far as pitchers not going as deep into games today, I think it more the accepted strategy today, we often see relievers when the starter is showing no sign of weakning. Bring in a fresh arm in the late innings.
    Last edited by SHOELESSJOE3; 02-24-2012, 04:35 AM.

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  • leewileyfan
    replied
    I buy it, totally. When I was growing up in the late '30s and the pre-war '40s, the typical game lasted from 1 hour 20 minutes to 1 hour 40 minutes, tops, if there were no extra innings. Oh, maybe a 12-10 slug fest might make exceptions; but the rule was brevity.

    I believe ALL positions, not just pitchers, have experienced a combined mental and physical fatigue of sorts with the tedious down-times, with specialists, brief starts, strategy sessions on the mound, stalling tactics at the plate. Basically, they have extended to fit quite well with the reigning timekeeper: COMMERCIAL TIME.

    Games longer than they should be are wearing on spectators and players alike. [IMO].

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  • Second Base Coach
    replied
    I have no data... but I would think the chances of throwing a no-hitter would increase if the other pitcher is keeping up to some extent. I am supposing no-hitters rarely happen durning blowouts.

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  • HitchedtoaSpark
    replied
    There is, IMO, a great deal of validity to this conviction, entertaining it myself during my studies. Few would argue that rhythm is as essential to the success of the baseball pitcher as it is to any other single athletic endeavor.

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  • Tyrus4189Cobb
    started a topic Faster Games Helped Stamina?

    Faster Games Helped Stamina?

    I've been toying with the possibility that the quicker games of the deadball era (and in general up until the 1990s) helped pitchers' stamina. Games were faster paced because of less changing of balls, nonsense at the plate, and quicker intervals of the pitcher being ready. If you work out, or even throw a baseball, a nice pace puts a strain on your arm, but you won't really feel fatigued until after the workout. Given this, is it possible that pitchers could last longer because there was less time for fatigue to settle in? They would keep up a quick pace before their arms got sore?

    Modern pitchers get a bum rap about not being able to go past the sixth inning or 100 pitches. Would pitchers of yesteryear have the same difficulties in this era?

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