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  • bat size of the greats

    I'm quite interested in pro players bats. I heard that some old timers did use huge bats. So post here if you know anything about the bats ( size,weight other) of Ruth, Williams, Cobb, Hornsby or any other significant player.
    I now have my own non commercial blog about training for batspeed and power using my training experience in baseball and track and field.

  • #2
    Here's some current players, who just all happen to use a brand name:

    http://www.slugger.com/story/players/index.html

    where you can learn:

    Alex Rodriguez's Bat:
    BAT MODEL: P72 / C271C
    WOOD: Ash
    FINISH: Black
    LENGTH: 34"
    WEIGHT: 31 oz.

    Here's an interesting article about the evolution of the MLB bat:
    http://www.stevetheump.com/Bat_History.htm

    Where you can learn Gehrig's bat was , Model GE 69 with a 2 1/2 to 2 5/8 inch barrel, 34 inches in length and weighing 38 ounces.
    Probably more there too.

    Mebbe something here:
    http://www.baseball-bats.net/basebal...ory/index.html

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    • #3
      Auction info on Musial bats sold through tte years at legit auction houses such a Lelands. Very likely 100% accurate info. It looks like Stan did not change much through the years... A half inch in length or a 1/2-1 ounce difference.


      Musial, Stan. Era 1951-1957, model 15V, length 34 ½”, weight 33.1oz. Block name MUSIAL TYPE, PERSONAL MODEL above name LIGNINIZED below. Private collection.

      Musial, Stan. Era 1951-1957, model 15B, length 34 ½”, weight 32 ½”. Block name MUSIAL TYPE, PERSONAL MODEL above name LIGNINIZED below, Grey Flannel May 2004.

      Musial, Stan. Era 1951-1957, model 15B, length 34 ½”, weight 32oz. Block name MUSIAL TYPE, PERSONAL above name MODEL below. MASTROs December 2004.

      Musial, Stan. Era 1951-1957, model 57B, length 34”, weight 31oz. Block name MUSIAL, ADIRONDACK above name PERSONAL MODEL below. REA July 2000.

      Musial, Stan. Era 1951-1957, model 15B, length 34 ½”, weight 32 oz. Block name STAN MUSIAL, PERSONAL above name MODEL below, MASTROs April 2004.

      Musial, Stan. Era 1958-1960, model 57B, length 34 ½”. Block name STAN MUSIAL, ADIRONDACK above name PERSONAL MODEL below, Leland’s June 1998.

      Musial, Stan. Era 1958-1960, model 57B, length 34 ½”, weight 31oz. Block name STAN MUSIAL, ADIRONDACK above name PERSONAL MODEL below, MASTROs April 2003.

      Musial, Stan. Era 1960, Length 34 ½”. Block name MUSIAL, 1960 All Star markings, ADIRONDACK above name PERSONAL MODEL below. Leland’s November 1993


      I've also read that the model M159 was made to his specifications (perhaps in 1953 iirc), so there might be some info on that model number out there. Wasn't Musial one of the first (or at least one of the biggest stars) to first move to a lighter bat? Or least part of that initial movement I think...
      "Herman Franks to Sal Yvars to Bobby Thomson. Ralph Branca to Bobby Thomson to Helen Rita... cue Russ Hodges."

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      • #4
        Originally posted by dominik View Post
        I'm quite interested in pro players bats. I heard that some old timers did use huge bats. So post here if you know anything about the bats ( size,weight other) of Ruth, Williams, Cobb, Hornsby or any other significant player.
        Cobb was somewhat consistent in the size of his bats over the years.He primarily used bats that weighed from 40 to 44oz and were 34.5" in length.I recall reading that he experimented with a 46oz. bat for a very short period in his prime.He went as low as 35oz for a few months in 1924,but switched to a 38 ouncer for the rest of that season.In the last 2 years of his career he used 37 and 38 oz bats.I think his bats were by then 34" in length.Ruth`s bats weighed well into the 40s and he did order a couple that weighed 54 oz.I believe his bats were generally 36" in length.At the end of his career some of his orders called for bats just a fraction of an inch under 35''.His model was famous for it`s large knob("Ruth knob").Hornsby`s bat was famous for the "Hornsby knob" which is a super small knob.During the 20`s Hornsby used dark hued color bats.To this day there exist a brownish shade of color for bats that is referred to as ''Hornsby brown".All of the Hornsby game-used bats that I have seen on auction postings are listed at 35" in length and in the neighborhood of 37oz.If you google Gehrig,Williams,and Dimaggio(images)of them batting you will notice that they will often be using bats with the small "Hornsby"knob,and sometimes bats with the large "Ruth knob".Johnny Mize always used the Hornsby model(H117)in every one of his pictures showing him with a bat.I have yet to see a listing of an Edd Roush bat that actually weighs 48 ounces.His was supposed to be the heaviest bat ever used on a regular basis.More than a few people believe that Ruth actually used his 54 ounce clubs more than a few times!Joe Jackson`s model has the thickest handle of any bat.The longest bat was swung by Al Simmons(38 inches).Ruth later in his career would sometimes use a Hack Wilson model.It has a large knob,but the handle doesn`t flare where it goes into the knob.
        Last edited by Nimrod; 03-09-2012, 12:16 PM.

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        • #5
          Thanks guys great posts. Seems like the average bat size went down quite a bit. 34-36 with plus weights seemed to be standard now almost everyone uses a 33.5-34 (according to the LS link) bat weighing -2 at best.
          I now have my own non commercial blog about training for batspeed and power using my training experience in baseball and track and field.

          Comment


          • #6
            Yes,Musial and Williams were among the first great hitters to use lighter bats.For many years Stan`s M159 model had the thinnest handle of any bat(along with the M110).I think I have seen a picture of Musial with an Adirondack(flame-treated)bat as he poses with Ted Williams.I`ll bet that was at the 1960 All Star game.I remember zillions of years ago having to choose from a huge bat rack with a plethora of 34"Louisville Sluggers.I wanted the Stan Musial(M159),but I was concerned that it would get cracked easily with it`s thin handle.I ended up buying a Henry Aaron model with it`s thicker handle.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Nimrod View Post
              Yes,Musial and Williams were among the first great hitters to use lighter bats.For many years Stan`s M159 model had the thinnest handle of any bat(along with the M110).I think I have seen a picture of Musial with an Adirondack(flame-treated)bat as he poses with Ted Williams.I`ll bet that was at the 1960 All Star game.I remember zillions of years ago having to choose from a huge bat rack with a plethora of 34"Louisville Sluggers.I wanted the Stan Musial(M159),but I was concerned that it would get cracked easily with it`s thin handle.I ended up buying a Henry Aaron model with it`s thicker handle.
              do you have a picture of musials bat? I also heard that he was one of the first using a thin handle. cobb had a huge handle almost as thick as the barrell.

              I think later nearly all players used a thin handle because the thin handle gives more freedom to the wrists allowing for a better wrist snap (which generates more batspeed).
              I now have my own non commercial blog about training for batspeed and power using my training experience in baseball and track and field.

              Comment


              • #8
                "Herman Franks to Sal Yvars to Bobby Thomson. Ralph Branca to Bobby Thomson to Helen Rita... cue Russ Hodges."

                Comment


                • #9
                  Heinie Groh and his Bottle Bat.
                  Attached Files

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by dominik View Post
                    do you have a picture of musials bat? I also heard that he was one of the first using a thin handle. cobb had a huge handle almost as thick as the barrell.

                    I think later nearly all players used a thin handle because the thin handle gives more freedom to the wrists allowing for a better wrist snap (which generates more batspeed).
                    I use to have a Jackie Robinson model(R17)in high school.It had a handle probably as thick as Cobb`s,maybe thicker.Cobb`s barrel was somewhat smaller than average whereas Jackie`s model had a big barrel,so Cobb`s handle,while large,looks even larger because of the smaller barrel.My brother gave me a Jack Wilson game-used bat(D189)that has a handle even smaller than a M110 model that I have in the closet.That is unbelievable how thin these modern players`bat handles are.I don`t have any pictures,but I didn`t get the Musial bat.The Aaron bat that I did get I still have.It is a R43 model.The R stands for...you guessed it..Ruth!Very ironic that Bad Henry used that model(as well as his A99).Lord,I wish I could go back in time with some money and buy that whole rack of bats!The M110 was given to me by a mascot of the local pro-team back in the mid-90`s.The M stands for Malone.It is very similar to the Musial-but the knob is smaller.Al Kaline used one,sometimes Mantle.I just noticed:Stan The Man is posting a picture of M159!
                    Last edited by Nimrod; 03-09-2012, 03:08 PM.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by StanTheMan View Post
                      great picture. that is a beautiful bat. I would say that for today's standard that handle is ot especially thin. there are now a lot thinner handles (or are barrells bigger?) but for that time that was certainly very thin.
                      I now have my own non commercial blog about training for batspeed and power using my training experience in baseball and track and field.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        That is a perfect picture!Thanks for posting.Kind of strange about the blocked letter MUSIAL MODEL vs the signature (cursive) Stan Musial.He did at one time endorse Louisville Sluggers.And when I was looking at the Musial LS,it had his signature(this was in the late 70`s-long after he retired).It must have something to do with him using those Adirondacks.I have only seen one picture of him using an Adirondack though.He was still ordering and using M159 LS galore,but with blocked letters.Yes,there are several models today that have even thinner handles.I have a D189 bat that has a thinner handle than my M110(which has the same sized handle as Musial`s M159).No wonder they crack so many bats nowadays!
                        Last edited by Nimrod; 03-09-2012, 03:01 PM.

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                        • #13
                          I want a bottle-bat too!!Groh knew how to use that bat.He hit in the .290s lifetime.

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                          • #14
                            Harry Heilmann used a 36 ounce bat.
                            Hornsby used a 38-40 oz. bat.
                            Ruth’s bats ranged from 40 to 54 ozs.
                            Manush’s bats ranged between 34 to 40 ozs. 34 to 36 inches in length.
                            Ted Williams used a 35-inch, 32-34 oz. bat in 1941.
                            Musial used a 34 ½ inch, 33 oz. bat in the 1940s.
                            George Kell used a 34 inch, 33 oz. bat in 1949 .

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Tony Gwynn used light bats because he was used to aluminum ones from college. Trying to find length and weight. Nap Lajoie invented and patented a bat in his early days with Cleveland. It has two knobs to keep the hands at a consistent distance. It began being marketed by Wright & Ditson in 1903.

                              dbl_hdl.gif
                              Last edited by bluesky5; 04-17-2014, 09:30 AM.
                              "No matter how great you were once upon a time — the years go by, and men forget,” - W. A. Phelon in Baseball Magazine in 1915. “Ross Barnes, forty years ago, was as great as Cobb or Wagner ever dared to be. Had scores been kept then as now, he would have seemed incomparably marvelous.”

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