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Who had the most perfect / accomplished season?

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  • Who had the most perfect / accomplished season?

    The first guy who comes to mind is Orel Hershiser in 1988. He won the Cy Young award unanimously, set the consecutive scoreless innings record (a record which still stands), and led his team to the title, winnings the LCS MVP and the World Series MVP along the way. He also received both The Sporting News Pitcher of the Year and Sports Illustrated magazine's Sportsman of the Year award.

    I can't think of more perfect season by a player but I'm sure there are some...
    Last edited by GiambiJuice; 06-13-2012, 01:56 PM.
    My top 10 players:

    1. Babe Ruth
    2. Barry Bonds
    3. Ty Cobb
    4. Ted Williams
    5. Willie Mays
    6. Alex Rodriguez
    7. Hank Aaron
    8. Honus Wagner
    9. Lou Gehrig
    10. Mickey Mantle

  • #2
    Koufax in '63 - MVP, CY, WS MVP, championship, NL Babe Ruth Award, NL TSN Pitcher of the Year, NL Triple Crown, Major League Player of the Year

    Comment


    • #3
      Lou Boudreau 1948, both as player and as manager.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by EdTarbusz View Post
        Lou Boudreau 1948, both as player and as manager.
        That's a really good one.

        Another one that comes to mind is Frank Robinson in 1966. In his first year as an Oriole, he the league in BA, HR, RBI, (triple crown) Runs scored, OBP, SLG, OPS+, TB...just about everything. He was the unanimous MVP of the regular season, and he led the Orioles to a sweep of the Dodgers in the World Series, taking home the World Series MVP.
        My top 10 players:

        1. Babe Ruth
        2. Barry Bonds
        3. Ty Cobb
        4. Ted Williams
        5. Willie Mays
        6. Alex Rodriguez
        7. Hank Aaron
        8. Honus Wagner
        9. Lou Gehrig
        10. Mickey Mantle

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by GiambiJuice View Post
          That's a really good one.

          Another one that comes to mind is Frank Robinson in 1966. In his first year as an Oriole, he the league in BA, HR, RBI, (triple crown) Runs scored, OBP, SLG, OPS+, TB...just about everything. He was the unanimous MVP of the regular season, and he led the Orioles to a sweep of the Dodgers in the World Series, taking home the World Series MVP.
          I think Carl Yastrzemski's 1967 season might qualify also. It wouldn't surprise me to find that Dick Williams was the first coach or manager to ever really push him.

          Frank Robinson in 1966 would be a really good choice.

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          • #6
            Stan Musial 1948.

            He lead the league in Runs, Hits, 2B, 3B, RBI, BA, OBP, SLUG, OPS, OPS+, TB, and WAR.

            Only blemish is that he didn't lead the league in HR; he had 39 HR and the league leader had 40.

            If he had that 1 HR, he would been atop every stat.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by EdTarbusz View Post
              I think Carl Yastrzemski's 1967 season might qualify also. It wouldn't surprise me to find that Dick Williams was the first coach or manager to ever really push him.

              Frank Robinson in 1966 would be a really good choice.
              Yep, I guess Robinson '66 and Yaz '67 are in the same boat.

              *Edit - I'd actually put Robinson's ahead (according to my own concept of a "perfect" season, since the Red Sox didn't win the World Series that year.
              Last edited by GiambiJuice; 06-13-2012, 02:21 PM.
              My top 10 players:

              1. Babe Ruth
              2. Barry Bonds
              3. Ty Cobb
              4. Ted Williams
              5. Willie Mays
              6. Alex Rodriguez
              7. Hank Aaron
              8. Honus Wagner
              9. Lou Gehrig
              10. Mickey Mantle

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by redban View Post
                Stan Musial 1948.

                He lead the league in Runs, Hits, 2B, 3B, RBI, BA, OBP, SLUG, OPS, OPS+, TB, and WAR.

                Only blemish is that he didn't lead the league in HR; he had 39 HR and the league leader had 40.

                If he had that 1 HR, he would been atop every stat.
                I'm looking more for perfect all-around seasons that culminate in the ultimate goal of every season - a World Series trophy. As great as Musial was statistically that year, his Cardinals didn't make it to the WS let alone win it.

                I guess that is technically where Yaz's '67 season would fall a little bit short of Frank Robinson's as far as what I was looking for, since the Red Sox lost in the WS that year.
                My top 10 players:

                1. Babe Ruth
                2. Barry Bonds
                3. Ty Cobb
                4. Ted Williams
                5. Willie Mays
                6. Alex Rodriguez
                7. Hank Aaron
                8. Honus Wagner
                9. Lou Gehrig
                10. Mickey Mantle

                Comment


                • #9
                  an MVP would have been nice

                  and he only finished 6th in league MVP voting and his own teammate won it so the argument could be made he wasn;t even the best player on his own team

                  and although he did not get the loss he gave up 2 runs in the 9th leading 2-0 in a game his team lost 3-2 so his post season record was not as good as many others who went undefeated and won all the games they pitched



                  Originally posted by GiambiJuice View Post
                  The first guy who comes to mind is Orel Hershiser in 1988. He won the Cy Young award unanimously, set the consecutive scoreless innings record (a record which still stands), and led his team to the title, winnings the LCS MVP and the World Series MVP along the way. He also received both The Sporting News Pitcher of the Year and Sports Illustrated magazine's Sportsman of the Year award.

                  I can't think of more perfect season by a player but I'm sure there are some...
                  1. The more I learn, the more convinced I am that many players are over-rated due to inflated stats from offensive home parks (and eras)
                  2. Strat-O-Matic Baseball Player, Collector and Hobbyist since 1969, visit my strat site: http://forums.delphiforums.com/GamersParadise
                  3. My table top gaming blog: http://cary333.blogspot.com/

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Dizzy Dean in 1934 has a good case. He led his league in WAR, won the MVP, was the last 30-game winner for 34 years, and the second-last to date.

                    The Cardinals won the World Series, with Dizzy going 2-1. He took a tough 3-1 loss to Tommy Bridges, but shut out the Tigers in game 7, the famous game where Ducky Medwick had to exit the scene under a hail of garbage.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      plus he no-hit the defending league champions

                      Originally posted by ipitch View Post
                      Koufax in '63 - MVP, CY, WS MVP, championship, NL Babe Ruth Award, NL TSN Pitcher of the Year, NL Triple Crown, Major League Player of the Year
                      1. The more I learn, the more convinced I am that many players are over-rated due to inflated stats from offensive home parks (and eras)
                      2. Strat-O-Matic Baseball Player, Collector and Hobbyist since 1969, visit my strat site: http://forums.delphiforums.com/GamersParadise
                      3. My table top gaming blog: http://cary333.blogspot.com/

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        If you add in what you cannot measure with statistics, Fernando Valenzuela had a really good year in 1981.

                        And don't forget the pressure on those around him. They were a bunch of guys who were close to going down in history as fellas who were just good enough to make the Series, but never good enough to win.
                        Your Second Base Coach
                        Garvey, Lopes, Russell, and Cey started 833 times and the Dodgers went 498-335, for a .598 winning percentage. That’s equal to a team going 97-65 over a season. On those occasions when at least one of them missed his start, the Dodgers were 306-267-1, which is a .534 clip. That works out to a team going 87-75. So having all four of them added 10 wins to the Dodgers per year.
                        http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p5hCIvMule0

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Is Willie Stargell the only player to win the regular season MVP, League Championship MVP, and the World Series MVP in the same year?

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by EdTarbusz View Post
                            Lou Boudreau 1948, both as player and as manager.
                            Tris Speaker in 1920 as player-manager. In his Speaker biography, Timothy Gay gives Tris his just due for the magnitude of what he accomplished, especially after Chapman was killed.
                            Last edited by csh19792001; 06-13-2012, 09:31 PM.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Feller in 46', esp. considering his workload....most brutal since the Deadball Era, or the 66 years since...

                              He was returning from 4 years in the service and at War. This might be the greatest modern pitching season. His, or Steve Carlton's epic 1972.

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