Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

When did the "Modern Era" actually begin?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • When did the "Modern Era" actually begin?

    Most folks hold the belief that the modern era of Major League Baseball occurred at or around the turn of the 20th Century. I think differently. I believe the "modern era" began about twenty years later.

    Before 1920, gambling ran rampant throughout the Major Leagues, so there's no telling how many games were either thrown or won with that corruption during the previous 50 years.

    Before 1920, the baseball was regularly and purposefully doctored by the pitcher with the sole intent to deceive the batter. By the time the ball left the pitcher's hand, it was nearly always a dark, muddy, clay, spit-ridden, stitches-missing, egg-shaped mess that the batter could barely see. It's the sole reason Ray Chapman was clocked in the head and died.

    After 1920, thanks to Judge Landis, gambling was outlawed and white baseballs became law, thus changing the game forever. At no other time has the game changed so dramatically as it did at that time.
    Put it in the books.

  • #2
    I think it is reasonable to say that Ty Cobb was the quintessence of the old tyme game of baseball. He would probably agree it changed around that time.

    Comment


    • #3
      A compelling argument for sure. It may not be right, but I base my own idea of modern baseball on when the leagues met for the first series in 1903. I'm a history buff and work off of hard facts and dates. Your theory is sound but the dates aren't set in stone. I can appreciate the idea though.
      unknown brooklyn cabbie " how are the brooks doin"
      unknown fan "good they got three men on base"
      unknown brooklyn cabbie "which one?"

      Comment


      • #4
        1947 when the "color line" was broke

        Comment


        • #5
          I think it was around 1900 because before that there were so many, many changes. Also both leagues by 1903 changed the foul strike rule, the NL in 1901 and the AL in 1903.
          Imagine a batter fouling off a half dozen or more pitches and having no strikes in the count.
          Keeler and McGraw loved that one, both known for deliberately fouling of pitches till they get a pitch they could drive.
          Fouling off a dozen was nothing for these two. Imagine Carew or Boggs playing under that rule_______________.400.

          Comment


          • #6
            For me, the modern era started with the 1901 season. First, it's tidy, historically speaking, to start with an '01. Moreover, MOST rules changes that differentiated the "old" game to the game we follow had been resolved, although the foul-strike rule was still in dispute. Then, too, we are reminded that the "game" is truly a hard-as-nails business venture, as we are treated to cross-town bitter roster raids in the '-01 - '03 adjustment period with the foul-strike rule resolved and the vision of a World Series being realized.

            I can't mark the entire game by a single player coming on the scene and dramatizing things. For me, it's a matter of time, circumstance and conflict resolution, in which case 1901 simplifies things.

            Comment


            • #7
              Another thing, I believe is that when the hall of fame was started there was a separate election for 19th century players indicating that there was already some tradition about the issue.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by BondsOverBabe View Post
                1947 when the "color line" was broke
                In many ways integration was the completion of a developemental period that began with the live ball. The live ball changed strategy and a lot of stats flew out of whack that favored the top sluggers such as the top ones getting more walks, and the average guys hitting a relatively smaller share of home runs than after expansion. The wars may have kept league quality (think of the average player) down somewhat until the mid 50s and integration finally led to the average guy getting a proportional share of value from walks and extra bases. Then almost immediately expansion started to thin out the level again.

                Comment


                • #9
                  The "modern era" began in 1994 with the 3 division alignment and wild cards.

                  stevegallanter.wordpress.com

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    There is a difference between the "Modern Era" of baseball the game and the "Modern Era" of MLB the organization.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      April 28th, 2012. The day that Bryce Harper made his Major League debut.
                      My top 10 players:

                      1. Babe Ruth
                      2. Barry Bonds
                      3. Ty Cobb
                      4. Ted Williams
                      5. Willie Mays
                      6. Alex Rodriguez
                      7. Hank Aaron
                      8. Honus Wagner
                      9. Lou Gehrig
                      10. Mickey Mantle

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by GiambiJuice View Post
                        April 28th, 2012. The day that Bryce Harper made his Major League debut.
                        lol

                        Originally posted by theAmazingMet View Post
                        A compelling argument for sure. It may not be right, but I base my own idea of modern baseball on when the leagues met for the first series in 1903. I'm a history buff and work off of hard facts and dates. Your theory is sound but the dates aren't set in stone. I can appreciate the idea though.
                        Originally posted by SHOELESSJOE3 View Post
                        I think it was around 1900 because before that there were so many, many changes. Also both leagues by 1903 changed the foul strike rule, the NL in 1901 and the AL in 1903.
                        Imagine a batter fouling off a half dozen or more pitches and having no strikes in the count.
                        Keeler and McGraw loved that one, both known for deliberately fouling of pitches till they get a pitch they could drive.
                        Fouling off a dozen was nothing for these two. Imagine Carew or Boggs playing under that rule_______________.400.
                        Originally posted by leewileyfan View Post
                        For me, the modern era started with the 1901 season. First, it's tidy, historically speaking, to start with an '01. Moreover, MOST rules changes that differentiated the "old" game to the game we follow had been resolved, although the foul-strike rule was still in dispute. Then, too, we are reminded that the "game" is truly a hard-as-nails business venture, as we are treated to cross-town bitter roster raids in the '-01 - '03 adjustment period with the foul-strike rule resolved and the vision of a World Series being realized.

                        I can't mark the entire game by a single player coming on the scene and dramatizing things. For me, it's a matter of time, circumstance and conflict resolution, in which case 1901 simplifies things.
                        Personally, I can't trust the outcome or stats of any game that took place before 1920, including World Series, for gambling was an institution that was infused in the game like water in a swimming pool. There are no hard facts, and nothing was tidy before gambling was outlawed.
                        Put it in the books.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by milladrive View Post

                          Personally, I can't trust the outcome or stats of any game that took place before 1920, including World Series, for gambling was an institution that was infused in the game like water in a swimming pool. There are no hard facts, and nothing was tidy before gambling was outlawed.
                          I agree with you about the World Series. I don't know how actual Series were thrown (I suspect that at least three were) but I would bet that there were several Series games thrown, probably to change the odds on Series outcomes and to keep Series's going to increase players and owners shares. I don't think it's a coincidence that there was only one four game sweep in the Deadball era World Series.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by milladrive View Post
                            Before 1920, the baseball was regularly and purposefully doctored by the pitcher with the sole intent to deceive the batter. By the time the ball left the pitcher's hand, it was nearly always a dark, muddy, clay, spit-ridden, stitches-missing, egg-shaped mess that the batter could barely see. It's the sole reason Ray Chapman was clocked in the head and died.
                            This doesn't contradict your conclusion, but to provide more information for the discussion I'd like to point out that the pitchers' practice of doctoring the baseball did not become commonplace until sometime after 1900, and even then not all pitchers chose to do so. Regardless of whether spitballs were being thrown, the ball was discolored by the end of the game because the same ball was used throughout; if it was fouled into the stands, the person who retrieved it was expected to throw it back. I doubt that it ever became egg-shaped; if it did the wobbling that would have occurred when it was pitched would have made it more, not less, visible. (I've probably taken your post too literally...)

                            In my opinion, it's not fair to say that the use of discolored balls was the sole reason that Ray Chapman was fatally hit in the head; it's not as if batters after 1920 were never again beaned by pitches.

                            With all that out of the way, I would say that major league baseball has continuously evolved. The changes were rapid during the 19th century, but even in the 20th century there have been important changes that have had a huge impact on the game--the two-strike rule, the use of a cork-centered ball (1911), the banning of spitballs and the crackdown on gambling, the end of the color line, the introduction of the designated hitter, and the influx of foreign players. We could also consider the impact of the introduction of amphetamines (1960s?) and later steroids. The Modern Era is the present.
                            Last edited by RUKen; 06-22-2012, 10:16 AM.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by milladrive View Post
                              lol







                              Personally, I can't trust the outcome or stats of any game that took place before 1920, including World Series, for gambling was an institution that was infused in the game like water in a swimming pool. There are no hard facts, and nothing was tidy before gambling was outlawed.
                              As long as there are no hard facts, why should we follow your lead. Yes we do know one WS was fixed, suspicion of others with no proof is just that suspicion.
                              Add to that, I assume were speaking of the overall game, not just the World Sreies.

                              Comment

                              Ad Widget

                              Collapse
                              Working...
                              X