Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

The 10 biggest errors in baseball history

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • The 10 biggest errors in baseball history

    http://sports.yahoo.com/blogs/mlb-bi...2768--mlb.html

    Yahoo published the above article in light of the 500,000th error in big league history being made. What do you think? Does it cover all the bases or is it lacking?

  • #2
    Ha! I knew Fred Snodgrass' error would be #1 before I clicked on the link!
    Strikeouts are boring! Besides that, they're fascist. Throw some ground balls - it's more democratic.-Crash Davis

    Comment


    • #3
      EDIT: Instead of what I posted below, I give you this... No championships were on the line but I think it deserves a mention... Way back in 1892, during a game between St. Louis and Chicago, Bill Dahlen, batting for Chicago, hit a ball towards the left-field corner. Cliff Carroll of St. Louis ran to cut off the ball and limit Dahlen to a single. As he grabbed the ball and proceeded to throw it, the ball slipped out of his hand and became caught in his pocket. No matter how hard he attempted to pull the ball out, it seemed to get deeper into his pocket. When he finally got the ball out, he threw it towards home plate but by that time Dahlen had already reached home plate, scoring a run...

      I believe the New York Giants Fred Merkle made a crucial baserunning error against the Cubs on September 23, 1908... It cost the Giants the victory that would have put them solo atop the standings and given them the NL pennant...
      Last edited by Capital City Goofball; 09-16-2012, 11:30 PM.

      Comment


      • #4
        Merkle's Boner wasn't defensive error, though.
        Strikeouts are boring! Besides that, they're fascist. Throw some ground balls - it's more democratic.-Crash Davis

        Comment


        • #5
          Whoops, I completely forgot baserunning errors are not officially recorded as an Error in the stat sheet... My mistake...

          Comment


          • #6
            Guessing Buckner 86 and one of Peckinpaugh's, game 7, 25 series. Oh, and Zimmerman chasing Collins home in Game 7, if that was scored an error. I know he got an error that game, but I don't know if on that play. Actually, I think not, but on a throwing error that led to a baserunner. Well, in that case, that one.
            Last edited by Jackaroo Dave; 09-16-2012, 11:32 PM.
            Indeed the first step toward finding out is to acknowledge you do not satisfactorily know already; so that no blight can so surely arrest all intellectual growth as the blight of cocksureness.--CS Peirce

            Comment


            • #7
              Fron what I read what Merkle did was common in his time. On plays like that the runner usually didn't bother to touch second base.
              Strikeouts are boring! Besides that, they're fascist. Throw some ground balls - it's more democratic.-Crash Davis

              Comment


              • #8
                Interesting that Leon Durham replaced Bill Buckner at first for the Cubs when Buckner was traded to Boston.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Well, no way Snodgrass was worse than Buckner. Buckner's error directly caused the loss of a WS game, whereas Snodgrass' was the first hitter of the inning. Had Matty struck out the side or gotten three outs, nobody remembers Snodgrass.
                  “Well, I like to say I’m completely focused, right? I mean, the game’s on the line. It’s not like I’m thinking about what does barbecue Pop Chips and Cholula taste like. Because I already know that answer — it tastes friggin’ awesome!"--Brian Wilson

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Honus Wagner Rules View Post
                    Fron what I read what Merkle did was common in his time. On plays like that the runner usually didn't bother to touch second base.
                    It's sad how one play defined his career... Something Bill Buckner and the others can all attest to... It's like Keith Olbermann said "He does something everybody did, for their own safety, as a game ended. He was the first player on whom the rule was ever enforced and he never lived it down." Merkle got some vindication, the Cubs haven't won a World Series since that year...

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Honus Wagner Rules View Post
                      Fron what I read what Merkle did was common in his time. On plays like that the runner usually didn't bother to touch second base.
                      Was it still common afterward, I wonder.
                      Indeed the first step toward finding out is to acknowledge you do not satisfactorily know already; so that no blight can so surely arrest all intellectual growth as the blight of cocksureness.--CS Peirce

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I just checked on Hack Wilson's famous misplays in the '29 WS, he didn't get charged with errors on the fly balls lost in the sun during the A's 10 run inning.
                        I also learned that Hack's mother died when he was 7 (parents were never married) and his unusual physique is considered by some to be due to Fetal Alcohol Syndrome.
                        "If I drink whiskey, I'll never get worms!" - Hack Wilson

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Capital City Goofball View Post
                          EDIT: Instead of what I posted below, I give you this... No championships were on the line but I think it deserves a mention... Way back in 1892, during a game between St. Louis and Chicago, Bill Dahlen, batting for Chicago, hit a ball towards the left-field corner. Cliff Carroll of St. Louis ran to cut off the ball and limit Dahlen to a single. As he grabbed the ball and proceeded to throw it, the ball slipped out of his hand and became caught in his pocket. No matter how hard he attempted to pull the ball out, it seemed to get deeper into his pocket. When he finally got the ball out, he threw it towards home plate but by that time Dahlen had already reached home plate, scoring a run...
                          He didn't attempt to throw it. There was a breast pocket in his uniform (top) and it got stuck in there after he stopped the ball with his chest. Supposedly, that put an end to those pockets.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Buckner's is too high, especially considering there are three game seven errors behind it.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              In Snodgrass`defense(no pun intended),he made a spectacular catch of the next batter`s(Harry Hooper) long clout that in Hooper`s opinion would have been a sure triple.Matty walked the next batter which brought Tris Speaker up to the plate.Mathewson got Speaker to hit a lazy pop up near first base that was manned by none other than Fred Merkle.Matty called for the slow footed catcher Chief Meyers to take it,but to no avail.Speaker,given a second life,belted the next pitch for a single to tie the score.Larry Gardner hit a long sacrifice fly to drive in the winning run.If Merkle had just caught the easy pop up.

                              Comment

                              Ad Widget

                              Collapse
                              Working...
                              X