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The 10 biggest errors in baseball history

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    westsidegrounds
    Registered User

  • westsidegrounds
    replied
    if they're going to include Mickey Owen's PB (not officially an "error") then they should have made room for Chesbro's WP in the 9th inning of the 1904 season finale, which cost his team the pennant.

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  • JR Hart
    2010, 2012, 2014

  • JR Hart
    replied
    Originally posted by Honus Wagner Rules View Post
    And no one remembers that Jorge Orta, the base runner called safe by Don Denkinger, didn't score.
    But the bad call did give them a baserunner, even he he was forced

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  • Tyrus4189Cobb
    Gator wrastler

  • Tyrus4189Cobb
    replied
    Didn't Roger Peckinpaugh make some crucial errors in the 1925 series?

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  • Tyrus4189Cobb
    Gator wrastler

  • Tyrus4189Cobb
    replied
    I read about the 1912 WS in the book First Fall Classic. It's one of my favorites because it really paints the picture well and has great character development, something every nonfiction book needs. Though they won the WS, the Red Sox were a divided team due to geographical upbringings. John McGraw, of course, drove his players into the ground. Smoky Joe threw a WS game and player-manager Jake Stahl, who came out of retirement and left his comfortable banking job, nearly quit in the middle of the postseason. Author Mike Vaccaro wrote about Snodgrass' error (paraphrasing because I don't have it with me):

    No matter what level you play, from tee ball to Little League, from high school to college, from the minors to the big leagues, there's always that odd chance that you'll simply drop the ball.

    Snodgrass did just that. Asked later about it, he said, "I don't know what happened. I just dropped it."


    In game 8, the Giants made another deadly mistake. I forget the exact details, but I promise to edit this post when I get my hands on my book (I'm at school until Friday). Trying to get a crucial out, one batter popped up in foul territory. A nervous Christy Mathewson saw Merkle going for it. Visions of Merkle's Boner flashed, and he called off Merkle in favor of the second baseman, Larry Doyle. It wasn't in time for Doyle to reach. The ball fell right between them. A few pitches later, the batter got a hit.

    Snodgrass evacuated Game 8 by motor vehicle to dodge angry fans. Later he would say that despite that catastrophe, his time playing for the Giants were the best years of his life.

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  • ipitch
    Registered User

  • ipitch
    replied
    Originally posted by westsidegrounds View Post
    And now, looking at the video posted above, what I see is that Wilson is gaining speed as he progresses toward first, as a batter-runner typically does. Buckner, on the other hand, is moving backwards as he attempts to make the play. He would have had to reverse his impetus, settle himself to push off toward the bag,
    Backwards?!? After he misses the ball, his next steps are forward. Maybe not straight forward, but certainly not backwards. He
    doesn't move backward until he briefly starts to go after the ball behind him. We are clearly not watching the same video.

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  • Honus Wagner Rules
    xFIP?! I laugh at you!

  • Honus Wagner Rules
    replied
    Originally posted by JR Hart View Post
    Darrell Porter's PB in 85 was huge. No one remembers Don Denkinger withouit Porter's PB.
    And no one remembers that Jorge Orta, the base runner called safe by Don Denkinger, didn't score.

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  • JR Hart
    2010, 2012, 2014

  • JR Hart
    replied
    Darrell Porter's PB in 85 was huge. No one remembers Don Denkinger withouit Porter's PB.

    Leave a comment:

  • EdTarbusz
    091707 0657

  • EdTarbusz
    replied
    Originally posted by SavoyBG View Post
    Mickey Owen's play was not an error, it was a passed ball.
    It was scored as an error.

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  • Honus Wagner Rules
    xFIP?! I laugh at you!

  • Honus Wagner Rules
    replied
    Originally posted by westsidegrounds View Post
    By that time in his career he really was. His ankles were seriously messed up, plus he sprained an achilles tendon in the playoffs against the Angels. He had all the guts in the world, and he was terribly mistreated by the Boston fans, but he wasn't going to beat Wilson to the bag.
    I believe John McNamara replaced Buckner with Dave Stapleton often for defensive. He forgot to do that in this instance however.

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  • westsidegrounds
    Registered User

  • westsidegrounds
    replied
    Originally posted by ipitch View Post
    It's preposterous to say that with certainty. That is simply your opinion. Did you see my last post (#25)? It appears to me that Mookie was right at the start of the 45-foot 1st base running lane when the ball reached Buckner, and Buckner was about 15' to 20' from 1st base. Do you disagree with those numbers? If so, please post your numbers.

    Watching the video, if you didn't know who the fielder was, would you say that the 1st baseman looked very slow? He doesn't look slow to me. He moves to the ball pretty quickly, no matter how much he may have hobbled at other times.
    It appeared to me, when I first saw the play all those years ago repeated ad nauseum, that Wilson had the play beat.

    And now, looking at the video posted above, what I see is that Wilson is gaining speed as he progresses toward first, as a batter-runner typically does. Buckner, on the other hand, is moving backwards as he attempts to make the play. He would have had to reverse his impetus, settle himself to push off toward the bag, and get there on his iced, ultrasounded, hydrotherapied, heavily taped ankles before Wilson, who had outstanding footspeed. I do not believe he could have done it: look, not at Wilson's first few steps, but at where he is and how fast he is moving when the ball is muffed.
    westsidegrounds
    Registered User
    Last edited by westsidegrounds; 09-17-2012, 03:44 PM.

    Leave a comment:

  • ipitch
    Registered User

  • ipitch
    replied
    Originally posted by westsidegrounds View Post
    By that time in his career he really was. His ankles were seriously messed up, plus he sprained an achilles tendon in the playoffs against the Angels. He had all the guts in the world, and he was terribly mistreated by the Boston fans, but he wasn't going to beat Wilson to the bag.
    It's preposterous to say that with certainty. That is simply your opinion. Did you see my last post (#25)? It appears to me that Mookie was right at the start of the 45-foot 1st base running lane when the ball reached Buckner, and Buckner was about 15' to 20' from 1st base. Do you disagree with those numbers? If so, please post your numbers.

    Watching the video, if you didn't know who the fielder was, would you say that the 1st baseman looked very slow? He doesn't look slow to me. He moves to the ball pretty quickly, no matter how much he may have hobbled at other times.
    ipitch
    Registered User
    Last edited by ipitch; 09-17-2012, 03:14 PM.

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  • SavoyBG
    Registered User

  • SavoyBG
    replied
    Originally posted by Cowtipper View Post
    http://sports.yahoo.com/blogs/mlb-bi...2768--mlb.html

    Yahoo published the above article in light of the 500,000th error in big league history being made. What do you think? Does it cover all the bases or is it lacking?
    Mickey Owen's play was not an error, it was a passed ball.

    Leave a comment:

  • westsidegrounds
    Registered User

  • westsidegrounds
    replied
    Originally posted by ipitch View Post

    Buckner wasn't that slow,.
    By that time in his career he really was. His ankles were seriously messed up, plus he sprained an achilles tendon in the playoffs against the Angels. He had all the guts in the world, and he was terribly mistreated by the Boston fans, but he wasn't going to beat Wilson to the bag.

    Leave a comment:

  • Bothrops Atrox
    IDC/ZRC/NJC*/*

  • Bothrops Atrox
    replied
    Originally posted by ipitch View Post
    Stanley took off for 1st base as soon as the ball was hit.

    It's been debated for years as to whether Mookie would have been safe anyway. I say there's no chance that he "would easily beaten him (Buckner) to first". Watching the replay, Mookie appeared to be right at the start of the 45-foot 1st base running lane when the ball reached Buckner. Buckner appears to be about 15' from 1st base. 20' at most. Buckner wasn't that slow, and he seems to be moving pretty quickly in the video.
    I agree - I tend to think Buckner beats Wilson to the bag by a half-o-step. Of course we will never really know.

    Leave a comment:

  • Dude Paskert
    The Grand Poobah of Sweat

  • Dude Paskert
    replied
    Originally posted by EdTarbusz View Post
    I think even if Buckner came up with the ball Wilson would have easily beaten him to first. The Red Sox pitcher was really let off the hook because I think he would have been the goat if Buckner made the play and the pitcher wasn't there to cover first. I don't think Buckner was the goat of that game. It was Schiraldi and Stanley.
    I think that this is right, Stanley would have had to been really hustling off the mound to record an out at first, Billy Buck couldn't have done it. The mess was really not of Buckner's making, and I've said before that everybody knew he shouldn't have even been in the game at that point...Stapleton was an agile defender who probably could handled that ball unassisted to at least leave it a tie game.
    I also question McNamara's decision to not start that inning with Stanley, Schiraldi was clearly terrified on the mound...he basically threw fastballs down the middle the whole time. I guess the issue would have been what to do if you put Stanley in and he wasn't on that night, so that's not an easy call.

    Leave a comment:

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