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The 10 biggest errors in baseball history

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  • Bothrops Atrox
    replied
    Not errors since no contact was made with the ball, but I always think about Flood stumbling in CF in 1968 vs. the Tigers and then karma striking when when Granderson fell in CF during the Cardinals Game 4 comeback in 2006. Neither errors, but both defensive plays that cost big-time.

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  • ipitch
    replied
    Originally posted by westsidegrounds View Post
    Interesting. I had a look at Paul Dickson's The Joy of Keeping Score, and there's no mention of such a rules change in the "Year-by-Year Timeline of Scoring Rule Changes" section, which seems to be pretty thorough.

    Anybody have a 1941 rulebook lying around?

    EDIT - looking up Owen's fielding stats at BB-ref, it shows PBs and Catcher Errors as separate categories (e.g. 1938, 11 C errors (#2 in NL), and 7 PB (#3) -- ???
    Well, back then there were passed balls and errors, but some were scored differently than they are today. I don't know when the rule was changed, but it had to be changed at some point, unless the B-R box score for 1941 WS Game 4 is incorrect. The Retrosheet box score also says it was an error.

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  • westsidegrounds
    replied
    Originally posted by ipitch View Post
    The baseball-reference box score says it was an error. I'm pretty sure there was a rule change at one point. It wouldn't be an error if it happened today, but apparently it was in 1941.
    Originally posted by EdTarbusz View Post
    It was probably the rules of the day. Several times during the radio broadcast Bob Elson states that when a runner reaches first on a strikeout it is scored as an error on the catcher. Bilheimer should have looked a little more closely at this game.
    Interesting. I had a look at Paul Dickson's The Joy of Keeping Score, and there's no mention of such a rules change in the "Year-by-Year Timeline of Scoring Rule Changes" section, which seems to be pretty thorough.

    Anybody have a 1941 rulebook lying around?

    EDIT - looking up Owen's fielding stats at BB-ref, it shows PBs and Catcher Errors as separate categories (e.g. 1938, 11 C errors (#2 in NL), and 7 PB (#3) -- ???
    Last edited by westsidegrounds; 09-18-2012, 11:44 AM.

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  • EdTarbusz
    replied
    Originally posted by westsidegrounds View Post
    How is that possible?

    "The official scorer of Game Four absolved Hugh Casey of any blame for the dropped third strike by declaring it a passed ball ..." Billheimer: Baseball and the Blame Game (McFarland, 2007) p. 123

    "The official scorer shall charge a catcher with a passed ball when the catcher fails to hold or to control a legally pitched ball that should have been held or controlled with ordinary effort, thereby permitting a runner or runners to advance. When the third strike is a passed ball, permitting the runner to reach first base, the official scorer shall score it a strikeout and a passed ball." Official Rules of Baseball 10.13(b)

    "The official scorer shall not charge an error when a batter is awarded first base on four called balls, when the batter is awarded first base when touched by a pitched ball, or when the batter reaches first base as the result of a wild pitch or passed ball." Official Rules 10.12(e)
    It was probably the rules of the day. Several times during the radio broadcast Bob Elson states that when a runner reaches first on a strikeout it is scored as an error on the catcher. Bilheimer should have looked a little more closely at this game.

    Leave a comment:


  • ipitch
    replied
    Originally posted by westsidegrounds View Post
    How is that possible?

    "The official scorer of Game Four absolved Hugh Casey of any blame for the dropped third strike by declaring it a passed ball ..." Billheimer: Baseball and the Blame Game (McFarland, 2007) p. 123

    "The official scorer shall charge a catcher with a passed ball when the catcher fails to hold or to control a legally pitched ball that should have been held or controlled with ordinary effort, thereby permitting a runner or runners to advance. When the third strike is a passed ball, permitting the runner to reach first base, the official scorer shall score it a strikeout and a passed ball." Official Rules of Baseball 10.13(b)

    "The official scorer shall not charge an error when a batter is awarded first base on four called balls, when the batter is awarded first base when touched by a pitched ball, or when the batter reaches first base as the result of a wild pitch or passed ball." Official Rules 10.12(e)
    The baseball-reference box score says it was an error. I'm pretty sure there was a rule change at one point. It wouldn't be an error if it happened today, but apparently it was in 1941.

    Leave a comment:


  • westsidegrounds
    replied
    Originally posted by EdTarbusz View Post
    Mickey Owen's mis-play in the 1941 Series was officially scored as an error.
    How is that possible?

    "The official scorer of Game Four absolved Hugh Casey of any blame for the dropped third strike by declaring it a passed ball ..." Billheimer: Baseball and the Blame Game (McFarland, 2007) p. 123

    "The official scorer shall charge a catcher with a passed ball when the catcher fails to hold or to control a legally pitched ball that should have been held or controlled with ordinary effort, thereby permitting a runner or runners to advance. When the third strike is a passed ball, permitting the runner to reach first base, the official scorer shall score it a strikeout and a passed ball." Official Rules of Baseball 10.13(b)

    "The official scorer shall not charge an error when a batter is awarded first base on four called balls, when the batter is awarded first base when touched by a pitched ball, or when the batter reaches first base as the result of a wild pitch or passed ball." Official Rules 10.12(e)
    Last edited by westsidegrounds; 09-18-2012, 07:57 AM.

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  • SamtheBravesFan
    replied
    Originally posted by Orioles5 View Post
    Marquis Grissom dropping a fly ball in Game 5 of the 1996 World Series was very costly for the Braves.
    Not specifically. The Braves had 6 innings to get one run after that, they couldn't do it. The wasted opportunity in the sixth inning on offense was much more costly.

    Leave a comment:


  • EdTarbusz
    replied
    Originally posted by westsidegrounds View Post
    if they're going to include Mickey Owen's PB (not officially an "error") then they should have made room for Chesbro's WP in the 9th inning of the 1904 season finale, which cost his team the pennant.
    Mickey Owen's mis-play in the 1941 Series was officially scored as an error.

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  • ian2813
    replied
    Originally posted by Jackaroo Dave View Post
    Peckinpaugh made 8 errors altogether, inclluding 2 in the late innings of game 7 that led to Pirates' unearned runs and come-from -behind win.
    In Peckinpaugh's defense though, wasn't Game 7 played in the rain? I'd imagine that didn't make fielding conditions especially favorable.

    Leave a comment:


  • Jackaroo Dave
    replied
    Originally posted by Buzzaldrin View Post
    Zimmerman wasn't (according to several sources, but specifically here Arthur Daley) the actual goat.

    Just found it digging through the library- quote from Daley:

    "The Giants trapped (Eddie) Collins between third and home. He jockeyed back and forth on the baselines to give the other runners a chance to advance. Catcher Bill rariden of the Giants, the actual goat in this most peculiar drama, wandered away from the plate, leaving it uncovered. Since Collins' mind worked with the rapidity of his twinkling feet, he set out for home at full speed, the lumbering Zimmerman pursuing him vainly but valiantly, the ball clutched in one large paw.

    Zimmerman justifiably became quite irked by the critical barbs which immediately began to bounce off his innocent noggin. In one beautifully compact sentence he summed up the situation precisely. Said he:

    "Who the hell was I gonna throw the ball to- the umpire?""
    Yeah, I'm familiar with the revisionist version, maybe Daley's own. Well, I wasn't there, and it was not an error after all, so in its stead I'll nominate Zim's throwing error that put Collins on in the first place.

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  • Buzzaldrin
    replied
    Originally posted by Jackaroo Dave View Post
    Oh, and Zimmerman chasing Collins home in Game 7, if that was scored an error. I know he got an error that game, but I don't know if on that play. Actually, I think not, but on a throwing error that led to a baserunner. Well, in that case, that one.
    Zimmerman wasn't (according to several sources, but specifically here Arthur Daley) the actual goat.

    Just found it digging through the library- quote from Daley:

    "The Giants trapped (Eddie) Collins between third and home. He jockeyed back and forth on the baselines to give the other runners a chance to advance. Catcher Bill rariden of the Giants, the actual goat in this most peculiar drama, wandered away from the plate, leaving it uncovered. Since Collins' mind worked with the rapidity of his twinkling feet, he set out for home at full speed, the lumbering Zimmerman pursuing him vainly but valiantly, the ball clutched in one large paw.

    Zimmerman justifiably became quite irked by the critical barbs which immediately began to bounce off his innocent noggin. In one beautifully compact sentence he summed up the situation precisely. Said he:

    "Who the hell was I gonna throw the ball to- the umpire?""

    Leave a comment:


  • Orioles5
    replied
    Marquis Grissom dropping a fly ball in Game 5 of the 1996 World Series was very costly for the Braves.

    Leave a comment:


  • KHenry14
    replied
    Originally posted by Brooklyn View Post
    No it didn't.

    Buckner gets way too much blame for this. Most casual fans don't remember that the game was already tied when Wilson hit the ground ball, thanks to a Bob Stanley wild pitch that also put Knight in scoring position. I never understood why Schiraldi never had more blame on him for that game for getting into trouble, or Stanley for throwing a wild pitch to allow the tying run to score.

    And of course there are those that believe Wilson would have beaten it out for an infield single even if Buckner had come up with the ball, prolonging the inning for another batter.


    While what you say is true, my read is this...ball hit towards Buckner, goes through his legs, Knight scores, game over. Obviously Schiraldi and Stanley deserve some blame too for getting the Sox into that situation, but clearly Buckner's error allowed Knight to score. As to the speculation as to whether Mookie beats the play anyway (Mookie insists he would have) it's irrelevant to the discussion. The fact is the error allowed the winning run to score.

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  • Dude Paskert
    replied
    Originally posted by Honus Wagner Rules View Post
    I believe John McNamara replaced Buckner with Dave Stapleton often for defensive. He forgot to do that in this instance however.
    At one point McNamara said he left Billy Buck in because he thought he should be on the field when the Bosox won, but later on he changed his tune and said he thought Stapleton was too unreliable for such a critical situation.

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  • Jackaroo Dave
    replied
    Peckinpaugh made 8 errors altogether, inclluding 2 in the late innings of game 7 that led to Pirates' unearned runs and come-from -behind win.

    Leave a comment:

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