Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

One of these is not like the other?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • One of these is not like the other?

    In the vein of the 'Who's better' threads...

    In my brief time here on BBF I've come across a few posters who have claimed that one player/position/team with one of the following batting lines is clearly different than the others.

    Can you tell which one?

    A: OBP 25% better than league average. SLG 30% better than league average
    B: OBP 42% better than league average. SLG 36% better than league average
    C: OBP 34% better than league average. SLG 23% better than league average
    D: OBP 22% better than league average. SLG 30% better than league average
    E: OBP 32% better than league average. SLG 34% better than league average

    Which one doesn't belong? Or do they all belong?



    *OBP 25% better than league average = OBP/League Average OBP = 1.25
    6
    A
    0.00%
    0
    B
    50.00%
    3
    C
    0.00%
    0
    D
    0.00%
    0
    E
    16.67%
    1
    They are all equal
    16.67%
    1
    Other
    16.67%
    1

    The poll is expired.

    Last edited by filihok; 01-01-2013, 09:01 PM.

  • #2
    How's their defense?

    I'm kidding.
    Rest in Peace Jose Fernandez (1992-2016)

    Comment


    • #3
      Just checking: by 25% better than league average OBA, do you mean an OBA+ of 125, 25% of league average better than league average, or 133, 25% of the player's OBA better than league average?
      Indeed the first step toward finding out is to acknowledge you do not satisfactorily know already; so that no blight can so surely arrest all intellectual growth as the blight of cocksureness.--CS Peirce

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Jackaroo Dave View Post
        Just checking: by 25% better than league average OBA, do you mean an OBA+ of 125, 25% of league average better than league average, or 133, 25% of the player's OBA better than league average?
        See my edit

        Comment


        • #5
          Not quite sure I understand the question fully, but if you're asking which one is clearly statistically superior or inferior to the rest, I would expect the player (?) represented by line B to be one of the best in the league that season. Probably not true of the others short of a massive positional adjustment or incredible defense. (I generally hold great offense to be much more valueable than great defense, but the gulf is not so wide that amazing defense can't shorten it in this case.)
          Found in a fortune cookie On Thursday, August 18th, 2005: "Hard words break no bones, Kind words butter no parsnips."

          1955 1959 1963 1965 1981 1988 2017?

          Comment


          • #6
            Three more days to get your votes in before the shocking conculsion

            Comment


            • #7
              Is this five eras from the same player's career?
              Your Second Base Coach
              Garvey, Lopes, Russell, and Cey started 833 times and the Dodgers went 498-335, for a .598 winning percentage. That’s equal to a team going 97-65 over a season. On those occasions when at least one of them missed his start, the Dodgers were 306-267-1, which is a .534 clip. That works out to a team going 87-75. So having all four of them added 10 wins to the Dodgers per year.
              http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p5hCIvMule0

              Comment


              • #8
                I'm going with E because i don't think it's either extreme, as that would not be especially noteworthy, and of the remainder, its OB and SLG both are close to the medians, even though it's not the medianOPS+. It can't be C, because made-up multiple choice answers are almost always C and filihok would never stoop to a cliche. But they're never E. (They're never A, either, but I don't like that min OPS+.) E >? A > C > D > B. . . .
                Indeed the first step toward finding out is to acknowledge you do not satisfactorily know already; so that no blight can so surely arrest all intellectual growth as the blight of cocksureness.--CS Peirce

                Comment


                • #9
                  Poll closes today.

                  I'm disappointed that more of the great minds of BBF aren't able to easily see which of the above is so clearly different from the others.


                  Originally posted by Jackaroo Dave View Post
                  It can't be C, because made-up multiple choice answers are almost always C and filihok would never stoop to a cliche.
                  Unless I knew that people would know that I knew that they knew that multiple choice answers favor C and made it C for that reason.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by filihok View Post
                    Poll closes today.

                    I'm disappointed that more of the great minds of BBF aren't able to easily see which of the above is so clearly different from the others.
                    Unless I knew that people would know that I knew that they knew that multiple choice answers favor C and made it C for that reason.
                    I thought of that, but I think you are too high minded to succumb to mediocrity even as a strategy.
                    Indeed the first step toward finding out is to acknowledge you do not satisfactorily know already; so that no blight can so surely arrest all intellectual growth as the blight of cocksureness.--CS Peirce

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Jackaroo Dave View Post
                      I thought of that, but I think you are too high minded to succumb to mediocrity even as a strategy.
                      The answers were done at random. Drawing from a hat

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        So what's the answer? The suspense is killing me.
                        My top 10 players:

                        1. Babe Ruth
                        2. Barry Bonds
                        3. Ty Cobb
                        4. Ted Williams
                        5. Willie Mays
                        6. Alex Rodriguez
                        7. Hank Aaron
                        8. Honus Wagner
                        9. Lou Gehrig
                        10. Mickey Mantle

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by filihok View Post
                          In the vein of the 'Who's better' threads...

                          In my brief time here on BBF I've come across a few posters who have claimed that one player/position/team with one of the following batting lines is clearly different than the others.

                          Can you tell which one?

                          A: OBP 25% better than league average. SLG 30% better than league average
                          B: OBP 42% better than league average. SLG 36% better than league average
                          C: OBP 34% better than league average. SLG 23% better than league average
                          D: OBP 22% better than league average. SLG 30% better than league average
                          E: OBP 32% better than league average. SLG 34% better than league average

                          Which one doesn't belong? Or do they all belong?



                          *OBP 25% better than league average = OBP/League Average OBP = 1.25

                          Are these ballpark adjusted league averages? Also are these single season lines? If they are park adjusted they can't be anyone's career lines because no one had a 142% relative on base percentatge.
                          Last edited by brett; 01-09-2013, 10:19 AM.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by brett View Post
                            Are these ballpark adjusted league averages? Also are these single season lines? If they are park adjusted they can't be anyone's career lines because no one had a 142% relative on base percentatge.
                            The numbers were not ballpark adjusted


                            Originally posted by GiambiJuice View Post
                            So what's the answer? The suspense is killing me.

                            Disappointed that there were so few votes. But, the results are in.

                            Player A was Joe Morgan in 1973. His OBP of .406 was 25% better than the league average of .325 and his .493 SLG was 30% better than the league rate of .379.
                            Player B was also Joe Morgan. This time in 1975. Morgan .466/.508. League .327/.374
                            Player C was Joe Morgan again. 1972. Morgan .417/.435. League .311/.354
                            Player E was Joe Morgan in 1974. Morgan .427/.493. League .324/.369

                            Player D was Ben Zobrist in 2009. Zobrist had a .405 OBP and .543. The league averages were .333 and .418.


                            Nobody identified Zobrist's season as being the outlier among Joe Morgan's best and MVP seasons. This is good, because there's no real reason to. His 2009 was a legitimate MVP season when figuring his excellent offense and defense at a difficult position.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Only problem is, statistically it's not an outlier. It's only an outlier because of who he was (in this case, someone other than Joe Morgan). What this actually proves to me is:

                              a) I was right about what the outlier was. Morgan's 1975 season is his best by some distance (unless it was 1976, which you didn't include, possibly because it didn't match up as well with Zobrist).

                              b) Zobrist had one season that stands up with Morgan's 2nd-5th best. I hope you are not suggesting in any way that this proves Zobrist to be on the same level as Morgan. The woods are full of players that had one season the equivalent of one of the better ones of a Hall of Famer at the same position. The trick is doing it year-after-year. I'm guessing Morgan even has a few more seasons pretty close to the same level. When Zobrist does it a couple more times, then we'll talk.
                              Found in a fortune cookie On Thursday, August 18th, 2005: "Hard words break no bones, Kind words butter no parsnips."

                              1955 1959 1963 1965 1981 1988 2017?

                              Comment

                              Ad Widget

                              Collapse
                              Working...
                              X