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Carl Yastrzemski's odd career

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  • bluesky5
    replied
    Ahhh, right, right.

    Leave a comment:


  • scottmitchell74
    replied
    Originally posted by Jar of Flies View Post
    High octane in 69 vs 68 sure, 4.1 vs 3.4 runs/game, but good call, not historically a high run environment year.
    Yeah, that's what I meant. Should have been more clear. Compared to 1968's abyss.

    Leave a comment:


  • Jar of Flies
    replied
    Originally posted by bluesky5 View Post

    High octane?
    High octane in 69 vs 68 sure, 4.1 vs 3.4 runs/game, but good call, not historically a high run environment year.

    Leave a comment:


  • bluesky5
    replied
    Originally posted by scottmitchell74 View Post
    On the theme of "Yaz's Odd Career" I was looking at his 68-70 stretch:

    I found it odd that although his power stats were great he had that .255 average in the high-octane 1969 environment. Was his .241 BABIP just some wild season-long bad luck?
    High octane?

    Leave a comment:


  • Bamay22
    replied
    Originally posted by scottmitchell74 View Post
    On the theme of "Yaz's Odd Career" I was looking at his 68-70 stretch:

    I found it odd that although his power stats were great he had that .255 average in the high-octane 1969 environment. Was his .241 BABIP just some wild season-long bad luck?
    Looks like it.

    Leave a comment:


  • scottmitchell74
    replied
    On the theme of "Yaz's Odd Career" I was looking at his 68-70 stretch:

    I found it odd that although his power stats were great he had that .255 average in the high-octane 1969 environment. Was his .241 BABIP just some wild season-long bad luck?

    Leave a comment:


  • Bucketfoot
    replied
    Yaz was known for having great first halves that helped put him in All Star games later on in his career-'74, 75, '78, 79, 82, then semi tanking in the 2nd half. Age, injuries, wear and tear mostly getting to him. Check out his first half of '82, pretty good.

    Leave a comment:


  • Floyd Gondolli
    replied
    Originally posted by pheasant View Post
    Thanks Sultan. I like your work on those projections.
    I do also. Very much.

    Leave a comment:


  • BigRon
    replied
    Originally posted by brett View Post
    It should be noted that tOPS+ does not tell you the split of a players home and road OPS+ scores. IF a player played in a higher offensive home park, his home TOPS+ goes up, and his road TOPS+ goes down even if he was a better RELATIVE hitter on the road, and it doesn't account for a normal home road edge either.
    Ted Williams for example has a 94 tOPS+ on the road, but he was a better relative hitter (virtually identical) on the road and away from Fenway park than he was "at home in Fenway".

    FWIW though, Williams OPS+ against Lefties would be about 145 which seems to be somewhat susceptible. It was about 200 against righties.
    Thanks, Brett- many are misusing and misinterpreting home/road tOPS+. This has happened frequently in various threads, including this one.

    Leave a comment:


  • pheasant
    replied
    Originally posted by Sultan_1895-1948 View Post
    In an effort to not hijack a Yaz thread any further, I'll just post the link Pheasant.

    http://www.baseball-fever.com/showth...40#post2089240
    Thanks Sultan. I like your work on those projections.

    Leave a comment:


  • Sultan_1895-1948
    replied
    In an effort to not hijack a Yaz thread any further, I'll just post the link Pheasant.

    http://www.baseball-fever.com/showth...40#post2089240

    Leave a comment:


  • pheasant
    replied
    I basically place 90% of my player's value on what he did over a 9-10 year streak.

    This platoon thing that Floyd initially brought up earlier got me thinking. I wanted to see how lefties did against clean-Bonds during his incredible 9 year span from 1990-1998.

    Bonds had 1965 PA from 1990-1998, means that he faced a lefty in 34.4% of his PA. He put up a line of .298/.409/.562 against those lefties. That breaks down to a tOPS+ of 87 and an overall OPS+ of 163. I.e, had Bonds faced lefties 100% of the time, his OPS+ is still an amazing 163. Bonds BB% dropped markedly when he faced lefties. Bonds was walked far less frequently when he faced lefties, which explains why his OB% plummeted to ONLY .409 against them.

    Leave a comment:


  • Sultan_1895-1948
    replied
    Originally posted by ipitch View Post
    Or easier, partly because the pitchers would be subject to those conditions.

    [ATTACH]156870[/ATTACH]
    Pitchers could coast againsy nearly everyone except one or two batters if nobody was on, or only a guy on first base.

    The league BA was higher because K rates were so low, outfields were much larger on average, and fielding equipment was poor (scorers were very loose with judgements).

    There are points/counterpoints to be made. Imo it simply comes down to elites thriving no matter the conditions.

    Leave a comment:


  • Calif_Eagle
    replied
    Originally posted by TonyK View Post
    Yaz credited Hungarian born trainer Gene Berde for helping him get into great shape for the 1967 season. Ted Williams also had suggested Yaz close his stance, while Bobby Doerr advised him to raise his arms higher. One source mentions that Yaz never duplicated Berde's same off-season training habits in later years as they were too difficult.

    Had he produced several more seasons like 1967 then I think we would be debating who was the better player - Yaz or Ted.

    Anyone know what Yaz's feelings are about electing some of the PED users to the Hall of Fame?
    I recall reading about the above in a book about the "Impossible Dream" season and was always amazed that since Yaz was very highly paid for his era (didn't really need to work in the off-season) and that the workout regimen of Gene Berde resulted in a 1967 Triple Crown season that Yaz didn't make a deal with Gene to be his personal trainer and keep on with the same workout program for season after season.

    One can only imagine what kind of numbers Yaz may have produced in the next few seasons. Although... he was 27 in the Triple Crown season and that is the year Bill James identified as a typical ballplayers peak season.
    Last edited by Calif_Eagle; 08-23-2016, 01:52 PM. Reason: clarity, remove content

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  • brett
    replied
    It should be noted that tOPS+ does not tell you the split of a players home and road OPS+ scores. IF a player played in a higher offensive home park, his home TOPS+ goes up, and his road TOPS+ goes down even if he was a better RELATIVE hitter on the road, and it doesn't account for a normal home road edge either.

    Ted Williams for example has a 94 tOPS+ on the road, but he was a better relative hitter (virtually identical) on the road and away from Fenway park than he was "at home in Fenway".

    FWIW though, Williams OPS+ against Lefties would be about 145 which seems to be somewhat susceptible. It was about 200 against righties.
    Last edited by brett; 08-23-2016, 01:37 PM.

    Leave a comment:

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