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Pinson, Oliver or Anderson?

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  • #16
    Pinson was a much better player.

    Through age 28 he had 44 WAR. At that age, comparable to Yaz, 5 more than Reggie Jackson, 7 less than Kaline, 17 more than both Clemente and Molitor.

    Compared to all players in history through age 28 (when he was 28) he was:

    WAR 20th
    games 3rd
    at bats 1st
    hits 3rd
    runs 9th (since 1901)
    1b 7th
    2b 2nd (tied)
    3b 15th
    rbi 24th
    total bases 5th

    It's a shame, but he fell off the map after 28. While some players put up 2 or 3 stellar years between 29 and 35, and perhaps a couple good ones, he was all but pedestrian after 1967.

    Al Oliver is not imo in the same class as Pinson. He was a compiler and had only one season that was remarkable. Between 1959-65, Pinson put up 5 seasons of between 5.2 and 7.2 WAR each. Oliver's 3 best career seasons were 5.0, 4.6 and 4.0.

    Anderson is totally not in the same class.
    Last edited by drstrangelove; 01-13-2013, 06:57 PM.
    "It's better to look good, than be good."

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    • #17
      Originally posted by Muncus Agruncus View Post
      I never saw Pinson play, but my father liked him. At baseball reference he was compared to Oliver and Anderson. Hence, the poll. Just trying to gain a better understanding of what type of players he is similar to.
      By the numbers, he seems overall pretty similar to Johnny Damon, except with a different career path. he did have a couple of years that were better than anything Damon did, so he is probably a tad better.

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      • #18
        I give Pinson the edge for all-around play. Pretty close offensively, as others have said, with Pinson gaining a slight edge in speed and a large edge in defense. Plus, at least for the most part, he played in an era of less offense. (Although the couple years of Frank Robinson in the lineup with him probably helped more than Oliver's years with Stargell.)
        Found in a fortune cookie On Thursday, August 18th, 2005: "Hard words break no bones, Kind words butter no parsnips."

        1955 1959 1963 1965 1981 1988 2017?

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        • #19
          Pinson is a personal favorite from early baseball card days. What can I say I was drawn to the, what seemed to me, cool names and big numbers on the back. Other than that I can't add anything that hasn't been said already. One question if there is anyone who was around then. Was Vada considered part of the next class of OF after Aaron, Mays, Robinson, and maybe Clemente, in the NL from the late 50s to mid 60s?

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          • #20
            Originally posted by PVNICK View Post
            Pinson is a personal favorite from early baseball card days. What can I say I was drawn to the, what seemed to me, cool names and big numbers on the back. Other than that I can't add anything that hasn't been said already. One question if there is anyone who was around then. Was Vada considered part of the next class of OF after Aaron, Mays, Robinson, and maybe Clemente, in the NL from the late 50s to mid 60s?
            If I remember accurately, he was portrayed as a younger brother to Frank Robinson. Pinson's breakout in 59 was only 3 years behind Frank, but Frank was an well-established star by then. I think Clemente actually broke in before Robinson, but his breakout was in 58, so he and Pinson seemed more nearly peers. This is pretty much hair splitting, but I was 9 in 55 and 16 in 62, so these little intervals were much bigger to me then. Mays, Mantle > Aaron, Robinson > Clemente, Pinson, Cepeda was how it seemed to me, but someone born a few years earlier might see it differently. None of these differences was great, and they all decreased as time went on.

            Pinson's walk-up music, by the way, was "Show me the Vada Go Home."
            Last edited by Jackaroo Dave; 01-14-2013, 05:17 PM.
            Indeed the first step toward finding out is to acknowledge you do not satisfactorily know already; so that no blight can so surely arrest all intellectual growth as the blight of cocksureness.--CS Peirce

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            • #21
              I was on Pinson needles wondering about that. Oliver time. If you Garret all about these guys you would, too.

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              • #22
                Originally posted by Jackaroo Dave View Post
                If I remember accurately, he was portrayed as a younger brother to Frank Robinson. Pinson's breakout in 59 was only 3 years behind Frank, but Frank was an well-established star by then. I think Clemente actually broke in before Robinson, but his breakout was in 58, so he and Pinson seemed more nearly peers. This is pretty much hair splitting, but I was 9 in 55 and 16 in 62, so these little intervals were much bigger to me then. Mays, Mantle > Aaron, Robinson > Clemente, Pinson, Cepeda was how it seemed to me, but someone born a few years earlier might see it differently. None of these differences was great, and they all decreased as time went on.

                Pinson's walk-up music, by the way, was "Show me the Vada Go Home."
                Thanks Dave

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