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  • The Eephus!

    I havent found a thread about it, so here goes. Anything and everything about the eephus! Anyone know how to throw one?
    WAMCO!

  • #2
    pitch was experimented with all the way back in the 1860s

    some to toss one:
    jack chapman
    harry wright - yes, that harry wright
    bill phillips
    slab burns
    rip sewell
    bill lee
    steve hamilton
    dave laroche

    doesn't take any particular skill to throw one - just a lot of practice - however, it's obviously not a terribly effective delivery
    Last edited by Brian McKenna; 06-17-2006, 09:19 AM.

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    • #3
      Didn't Ted Williams hit one for a home run in the All-Star Game?

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Elvis9045
        Didn't Ted Williams hit one for a home run in the All-Star Game?
        yup, and he was out of the batter's box when he did it

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Elvis9045
          Didn't Ted Williams hit one for a home run in the All-Star Game?
          Yes in 1946 off Rip Sewell, who made the pitch famous. I think Sewell described the eephus as meaning "nothing, and that's exactly what that pitch is, nothing"
          I remember Steve Hamilton throwing it with the Yanks in the 70's. He called his pitch the "Folly Floater"

          Welcome back ARod. Hope you are a Yankee forever.
          Phil Rizzuto-a Yankee forever.

          Holy Cow

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          • #6
            El Duque threw one to A-Rod. He knocked it into monument park.
            Ball game over. World Series over! Yankees win thaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa Yankees win!

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            • #7
              No one had ever hit the eephus for a homer, so in the all star game wiliam challenged sewell to throw him three of em. On the second or third, he took a running start and hit into the bullpens at fenway.
              WAMCO!

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Murderers Row
                El Duque threw one to A-Rod. He knocked it into monument park.
                El Duque threw what amounted to an eephus yesterday to Bobby Abreu and struck him out swinging.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by soberdennis
                  Yes in 1946 off Rip Sewell, who made the pitch famous. I think Sewell described the eephus as meaning "nothing, and that's exactly what that pitch is, nothing"
                  I remember Steve Hamilton throwing it with the Yanks in the 70's. He called his pitch the "Folly Floater"
                  It wasn't sewell who said that, it was pirates outfielder Maurice Van Robays who named it and when asked what it meant he said "Eephus aint nothin".
                  Here's a video of the Folly Floater
                  http://youtube.com/watch?v=fkU7LKb3Tq4
                  Originally posted by bkmkenna
                  doesn't take any particular skill to throw one - just a lot of practice - however, it's obviously not a terribly effective delivery
                  I disagree here. It's about psychology here. Our brains havn't developed the power to deal with slow motion and as many batters who came up against the Eephus and it's variants said it was like the ball was moving in slow motion. And if you look at the video, it looks like he's a child swinging at it. This is because his mind just can't deal with it. The only thing that baffles me on this subject is why aren't any pitchers using this technique. There's Casey Fossum of the Devil Rays who throws a low fifties curve and it can be deadly, but it's nowhere near as spectacular as the "Folly Floater".

                  People automatically discount the pitch because of the common belief that faster is better and anything just tossed like that will just be crushed.
                  Another note though, the homerun that Rip Sewell gave up in the All-Star game was the only one that he ever gave up when pitching the Eephus.

                  Basically what I'm asking for is an Eephus revival. Who's with me?
                  Greystones Mariners Baseball Club. The oldest baseball club in Ireland. 16 years and still going strong.

                  www.greystonesbaseball.org

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Padday
                    The only thing that baffles me on this subject is why aren't any pitchers using this technique.
                    Because day in and day out it's not effective and will eventually be easy to adjust to, as any "trick" will eventually be conquered. It will probably spark as much imitation in the future as it has in the recent past.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by bkmckenna
                      Because day in and day out it's not effective and will eventually be easy to adjust to, as any "trick" will eventually be conquered. It will probably spark as much imitation in the future as it has in the recent past.
                      I'm just saying it doesn't have to be used day in and day out, just when the batter is least expecting it. He just won't know what to do with it.

                      Some other advantages an eephus has are the way it drops vertically through the strike zone. It is much harder to line up a horizontally moving bat with a vertically moving ball (see video). Also less power can be generated from a slow moving ball (see Newton's third law of motion).

                      I say if you can throw one well, why not use it often. It might make you look like a complete idiot but what the hay.
                      Greystones Mariners Baseball Club. The oldest baseball club in Ireland. 16 years and still going strong.

                      www.greystonesbaseball.org

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                      • #12
                        I actually use the eephus style when practicing with my son at times. As a training mechanism, it helps with timing, makes the hitter wait for the ball and makes him shift his weight from the back foot forward with a big strong swing. I picked it up from the Ripken brothers training video.

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                        • #13
                          I can't hit it for my life, your son must be pretty darn good. There was some article about it being harder to hit a slow pitch... see kckid2599's first post in the Baseball Myths thread... don't feel like getting a link. I used one once in a game. It was a ball that bounced on the plate.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Erik Bedard
                            I can't hit it for my life, your son must be pretty darn good. There was some article about it being harder to hit a slow pitch... see kckid2599's first post in the Baseball Myths thread... don't feel like getting a link. I used one once in a game. It was a ball that bounced on the plate.
                            This is the link. It's quite an interesting piece there. Not only to do with slow pitching but the way we see the ball depending on how your playing and other things like that. Check it out:
                            http://www.baseball-fever.com/showthread.php?t=48376
                            Greystones Mariners Baseball Club. The oldest baseball club in Ireland. 16 years and still going strong.

                            www.greystonesbaseball.org

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                            • #15
                              The great Tom Seaver used to throw an eephus type pitch when he pitched for the White Sox in the mid-80s. He lobbed it up to the plate with about a 20-foot arc. He threw it only a few times a game as a change of pace. I recall that he struck some guys out with that pitch. Keep in mind that he was about 40 and had lost some heat from his fastball. At the time, his heater was in the 90-92 range - although he could still hit 95 on occasion.

                              Just like any other pitch it's all about timing and placement. A lot of guys swing at the ball thinking it will be easy to crush it even if it's not a strike. So they swing at a bad pitch thrown 40 MPH and pop it up or miss. It was fun to watch. Too bad more guys don't experiment with trick pitches nowadays.
                              "Batting slumps? I never had one. When a guy hits .358, he doesn't have slumps."

                              Rogers Hornsby, 1961

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