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Updates on Jim Albright's Japanese articles

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  • Updates on Jim Albright's Japanese articles

    In the early to mid 2000's, I wrote an article providing a major league equivalent of Sadaharu Oh's career and evaluated his worthiness for Cooperstown. The gold standard back then was Win Shares, which were not as widely available as WAR is now. I decided it was time to revisit that article given that more information is available than there had been, and also to reflect the use of WAR. I revised both halves of the article, though the changes in the first half aren't very consequential. The two parts of the article are here

    Part I: http://baseballguru.com/jalbright/an...lbright12.html

    Part II: http://baseballguru.com/jalbright/an...lbright13.html

    There will be more updated articles posted in the near future, and I will use this thread to announce those postings.

    Hope you find the reading interesting!

    Jim Albright
    Seen on a bumper sticker: If only closed minds came with closed mouths.
    Some minds are like concrete--thoroughly mixed up and permanently set.
    A Lincoln: I don't think much of a man who is not wiser today than he was yesterday.

  • #2
    Just learned about the durability king from japan...https://www.baseball-reference.com/r...d=kanemo001tom

    what type of mlb comps do you envision for tomoaki kanemoto?

    thanks
    Jacquelyn Eva Marchand (1983-2017)
    http://www.tezakfuneralhome.com/noti...uelyn-Marchand

    Comment


    • #3
      Durability king? Are you sure you don't mean Sachio Kinugasa? Kanemoto was the 74th best player in Japan in the earlier rating system, and I'm still working on this one and haven't gotten to him. That put him behind Roberto Petagine, and I wouldn't bother trying to sell anyone as a Cooperstown guy who takes many more years and finishes behind a guy who went to Japan because he struggled in under 438 plate appearances over many years. If Kanemoto finishes that way again, I'm not likely to evaluate him.

      I'm not going to do comps any more, as I think the WAR and WAA numbers are more informative.

      Kinugasa is one I did the last time since he finished 21st in the earlier rating system. He was tough to evaluate since he had some seasons that were well below his normal standards. It makes sense he would--I'm surprised he was adequate in Japan the year he played with a broken shoulder--and he would have fared worse in the majors had he tried to play with such an injury. He became a regular in 1968. Looking at it without something like seasonal WAR, it was tough to evaluate how good or weak some of those performances were. I expect to do his MLB WAR to get at issues like that. Another guy I'm looking forward to dealing with is Fukumoto, Japan's stolen base king. He had some years that didn't look great on their face when converted to an MLE, but at least a couple of years were in the 1960s, which means usual standards for offensive production would be too harsh.
      Seen on a bumper sticker: If only closed minds came with closed mouths.
      Some minds are like concrete--thoroughly mixed up and permanently set.
      A Lincoln: I don't think much of a man who is not wiser today than he was yesterday.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by jalbright View Post
        Durability king? Are you sure you don't mean Sachio Kinugasa? Kanemoto was the 74th best player in Japan in the earlier rating system, and I'm still working on this one and haven't gotten to him. That put him behind Roberto Petagine, and I wouldn't bother trying to sell anyone as a Cooperstown guy who takes many more years and finishes behind a guy who went to Japan because he struggled in under 438 plate appearances over many years. If Kanemoto finishes that way again, I'm not likely to evaluate him.

        I'm not going to do comps any more, as I think the WAR and WAA numbers are more informative.

        Kinugasa is one I did the last time since he finished 21st in the earlier rating system. He was tough to evaluate since he had some seasons that were well below his normal standards. It makes sense he would--I'm surprised he was adequate in Japan the year he played with a broken shoulder--and he would have fared worse in the majors had he tried to play with such an injury. He became a regular in 1968. Looking at it without something like seasonal WAR, it was tough to evaluate how good or weak some of those performances were. I expect to do his MLB WAR to get at issues like that. Another guy I'm looking forward to dealing with is Fukumoto, Japan's stolen base king. He had some years that didn't look great on their face when converted to an MLE, but at least a couple of years were in the 1960s, which means usual standards for offensive production would be too harsh.
        Looking forward to the updates : )

        Kinugasa has the consecutive game streak, but Kanemoto's feats were also quite impressive for durability.

        https://www.fangraphs.com/blogs/sund...-is-available/
        Article mentions Tomoaki as "iron man."

        https://www.baseball-reference.com/b...moaki_Kanemoto
        The bullpen notes: "In 2006 Kanemoto broke Cal Ripken Jr.'s world record for consecutive games played without missing an inning, appearing in 903 straight contests without an inning off. At the game, the electric scoreboard played a congratulatory message from Ripken, who also gave Kanemoto a bat inscribed with the saying "Congratulations, keep playing."...On April 18, 2010, Kanemoto asked to be removed from the starting lineup after beginning the year .167, ending his 1,492 consecutive games playing in every inning...Kanemoto's streak of 1,766 consecutive games played ended on April 15, 2011."
        Jacquelyn Eva Marchand (1983-2017)
        http://www.tezakfuneralhome.com/noti...uelyn-Marchand

        Comment

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