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  • Latin Names Question

    Could someone explain to me about Latino names, please?

    For example, Baseball-Reference lists Jose Martinez (1994) and having the following full name:

    Jose Miguel Martinez Martinez

    ???

    Surely the first "Martinez" isn't a "middle name," as Anglos are given to thinking about such things. I seem to remember someone mentioning once that the mother's maiden name was part of Latino names? Is that it? Did this guys' parents have the same last names before they married? Why do Latino's carry the mother's name, if that's the case? What does a Latino say when introducing himself? When asked to give his full name?

    Very curious about this (unique?) nomenclature.
    "It is a simple matter to erect a Hall of Fame, but difficult to select the tenants." -- Ken Smith
    "I am led to suspect that some of the electorate is very dumb." -- Henry P. Edwards
    "You have a Hall of Fame to put people in, not keep people out." -- Brian Kenny
    "There's no such thing as a perfect ballot." -- Jay Jaffe

  • #2
    You're right, Chancellor...it's just a coincidence in this case that both side's of José's family carried this rather common Latin surname.

    Actually using both names is more of a formal custom. You may often see it on business cards, for example.

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    • #3
      You will see that usually with Mexican/Spaniards/Argentina more than other times.

      Latino names usually include a middle-name, usually another family members like Gran'ma, then the two last names.
      For example: Juan Carlos Gomez Fernandez
      This name here if he comes to the US would most likely become "JC Fernandez" or "Juan Fernandez".

      My family does use the FIRST MIDDLE Father's-Surname format, but I did not get a middle name...thankfully.
      "After my fourth season I asked for $43,000 and General Manager Ed Barrow told me, 'Young man, do you realize Lou Gehrig, a 16-year-man, is playing for only $44,000?' I said, Mr. Barrow, there is only one answer to that - Mr. Gehrig is terribly underpaid."- Yankees outfielder Joe DiMaggio

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      • #4
        Since my eldest son possess a Mexican birth certificate, it is common in Latin Countries to use two surnames to identify.

        Example:

        Jose Jesus Ramirez Sanchez, the son of Jose Jesus Ramirez Gonzales and Maria Guadalupe Sanchez Gomez, would take on both surnames, with the father's surname listed first. The second surname is the mother's surname.

        In many Latin American countries, the children's names would often follow one of two patterns: Naming a child after either parent, grandparent, or other relative (which are aslo picked for religious reasons making "Maria" and "Jesus" quite common) and/or naming the child after the day in which he was born. For example, June 17th is la dia de San Ismael so children may be named "Ismael" or even "Ismaela."

        Many Jesuses and Marias actually may go by their middle name like Maria Delores would often be called Delores or "Lola" which is dimutive for Delores and the dual frist names like "Jose Luis" and "Maria Luisa" are quite common.

        My ex talked about a girl she grew up with was surnamed "Vaca" and she married a boy named "Del Toro." In Mexico, you retain all your names and add "de" and your husband's surname she became Maria Guadalupe Vaca Ramirez de Del Toro. Oh yeah, "vaca' means "cow" and "del toro" means "of the bull."

        When Latin Americans come to the US, the common practice is to drop the mother's surname, which is the scond one, or if that person does not possess a true middle name (like my ex brother in law) that make their mother's surname their middle name.

        My son's registered name in Mexico list his name as Brian (his middle name) (my surname) (her surname), but would normally go by his first surname in most casual conversations.

        Hope this helps.
        http://www.baseballhalloffame.org/ex...eline_1961.jpg

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        • #5
          also, it is not uncommon for a child's first name to be constructed using the mother's last name and the father's first name, or the first names or the last names of both.
          that is how the unconventional "yorvit" (torrelaba) occurred.
          "you don't have to burn books to destroy a culture. just get people to stop reading them." -ray bradbury

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Chancellor
            Could someone explain to me about Latino names, please?

            For example, Baseball-Reference lists Jose Martinez (1994) and having the following full name:

            Jose Miguel Martinez Martinez

            ???

            Surely the first "Martinez" isn't a "middle name," as Anglos are given to thinking about such things. I seem to remember someone mentioning once that the mother's maiden name was part of Latino names? Is that it? Did this guys' parents have the same last names before they married? Why do Latino's carry the mother's name, if that's the case? What does a Latino say when introducing himself? When asked to give his full name?

            Very curious about this (unique?) nomenclature.
            Simple, is just to identify you more... That's very common in Latin America...

            In the case of Jose Miguel Martinez Martinez it would be broken down this way:

            1st Name: Jose
            Middle Name: Miguel
            Fathers Maiden Name: Martinez
            Mother's: Martinez

            Usually, when people introduce themselves, they use only their 1st name, and their 1st surname (meaning, father's), just like in USA... For official uses though, you have to use your complete name... To make you more different...

            How many John Smith's do you know? But i bet that all those John Smiths would have different surnames coming from their mothers...

            Want a baseball example? DH David Ortiz official name's: David Ortiz Arias (Arias being the last name of his mother)

            Just to make it more clear, I'll write another example: In USA someone called Juan A. Perez, but here his real name would be Juan Antonio Perez Ortiz (son of Juan Perez Sr. and Mary Ortiz)

            Hope that helps... Any more questions??
            Last edited by Licey Fan; 02-20-2006, 02:26 PM.
            Licey campeón today and always!

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