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  • Baseball in China

    I'd be interested in hearing from any BBFers who plan to be in Beijing for the Dodgers-Padres games. The new 18.000-seat stadium appears attractive in pictures and I'm looking forward to seeing it firsthand.

  • #2
    Unfortunately there is no cable car going that direction. Sorry.

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    • #3
      sandlot﹕The new stadium appears attractive in pictures and I'm looking forward to seeing it firsthand.
      well...this stadium will be torn down after the Olympic game....

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      • #4
        Originally posted by ROC~~ View Post
        well...this stadium will be torn down after the Olympic game....
        isn't mlb trying to keep the chinese to preserve it
        And couldn't just a team in the league just use it

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        • #5
          twinsfan09:isn't mlb trying to keep the chinese to preserve it. And couldn't just a team in the league just use it
          This stadium is only a temporary structure... built just for the Olympic baseball game, just like the 2004 Athens Olympic baseball stadium.

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          • #6
            I've now been out there for two days. It has a temporary feel, though the main part could be preserved if one wanted to. Much of the seating is bleachers that are supported by scaffolding. The concessions are all in tents outside and the toilets are portable. It's in fairly central Beijing and the land must be quite valuable. Still, it's a decent ballyard, as good I'm sure as a lot of places on the minors. The infield is very slick, and new, but it's still early spring here and the ground is hard. Hu, the LA shortstop, had some bobbled balls but I lay some of that to the turf. The ball just never seemed to come up and got there really fast. All in all, though, it was a good game, competitive but not overly so. The fans got into it and the kids had a ball. Felt more like an opening day than an exhibition game. The fans entertained themselves doing the wave and just loved being able to have a ball land in the stands, or even better be thrown to them, and be free to keep it. Baseball had a good day.

            The second game was even better. Well played, jitters over, fans enthusiastic. Hot dogs okay but could be improved. Will it grow? Dunno, hard to say, but you have to start somewhere and this was a pretty good beginning. No Falun Gung banners or Free Tibet expressions despite what was happening there at the same time (Bjork had another engagement, I guess). They checked bags and had uniformed officers looking at people's tickets at every grandstand entrance. The batting cage was a big hit and from what I saw, the girls were better than the guys! I think maybe they were softball players.
            Last edited by sandlot; 03-16-2008, 05:26 PM.

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            • #7
              Can't wait

              I didn't make it over there for the Spring Training games, but I will be there for every day of the Olympic baseball tournament. I have all my tickets, bouncing back and forth between the main stadium and the 2nd stadium. Does anybody on here live over there. I have some non baseball questions if they could PM me so I could "talk" to you directly. Thanks!

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              • #8
                Originally posted by sandlot View Post
                No Falun Gung banners or Free Tibet expressions despite what was happening there at the same time (Bjork had another engagement, I guess). They checked bags and had uniformed officers looking at people's tickets at every grandstand entrance.
                I reckon security was pretty tight. I read that the president of the Padres was held outside for a while until he was "cleared."

                And I just found this:
                Originally posted by Geoffrey York, The Globe and Mail
                ... nearly 20 per cent of the seats were reserved for China's security agencies, a standard rule for sporting events in China
                Last edited by Pere; 03-17-2008, 07:46 PM.

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                • #9
                  An entire group of Cub Scouts in uniform was kept outside and then barred from their expected opportunity to meet players on the field. They finally met some players who came up to join them in the stands and I guess they were pretty okay with that, but they had really been looking forward to going onto the field. How cool would that be for kids that age? But the Chinese security guys wanted everybody off the field except players before game time and so it was done. It will be a lot tighter for the Olympics, especially after the Tibet unrest.

                  I would strongly advise anyone going there to arrive at the Wukesong stadium well before of the game -- and I do mean well before . Just an estimate, but given current security concerns, I'd say no later than two hours before game time if you want to see the first inning. The stadium is located at the subway station of the same name on the east-west line. It's about 4-5 stops west of Tiananmen Square. There will probably be buses but given the traffic I'd avoid them. The subways can be very, very crowded and are often crammed full by the time they get anywhere near downtown, and I'm talking about ordinary non-Olympics times. It's about a 10-minute walk, assuming no large crowd in front of you, from the subway exit to the stadium. Be sure to take the exit that's marked for the stadium, because if you come up at the wrong exit the only way across the street without risking suicide is to go back down into the subway and convince the staff to let you go through the tunnel. I think it's exit B, though the signage isn't great.

                  If anyone's going to be there for all the games, consider buying a subway pass, not individual trip tickets (2 rmb each), so you can go through the electroinic turnstiles that are just being installed. This will save you considerable time in peak periods. There is only one entrance to the stadium grounds, so of course it's a bottleneck. They will inspect every bag and I don't know if they will allow water bottles inside -- I'm just guessing, but I doubt it. Drink up what you bring with you. Don't expect anyone inspecting you to speak a word of English. Smile and nod a lot. There is no afternoon sun in the stands behind home plate, and no shade in the bleachers at any time. The summer sun can be HOT and I'd recommend sunblock, sunglasses and a hat. Beijing can also be quite dusty. There are no bad seats or blocked views, but the plastic seats in the bleachers are narrow for wide-bottomed foreigners. The only toilets are port-a-potties that you pass on the way in. Use them early as there aren't many for a 12,000-seat facility. Always carry plenty of tissue and sanitary handwipes with you.

                  If prices are the same, you'll pay 20 rmb (about $2.50) for a hot dog in the stands, same for a beer or coke. Water is 10 rmb. I would not advise carrying significant amounts of cash around in Beijing, and strongly suggest photocopying travel documents and carrying those. Leave valuables and original documents in a hotel safe desposit box, the one the cashier unlocks for you, not the one in your clothes closet. Also, look up the emergency phone number at whatever your national embassy is and carry it with you all the time. Hopefully you'll never need it.

                  Otherwise, enjoy the games!

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by sandlot View Post
                    An entire group of Cub Scouts in uniform was kept outside and then barred from their expected opportunity to meet players on the field. They finally met some players who came up to join them in the stands and I guess they were pretty okay with that, but they had really been looking forward to going onto the field. How cool would that be for kids that age? But the Chinese security guys wanted everybody off the field except players before game time and so it was done. It will be a lot tighter for the Olympics, especially after the Tibet unrest.

                    I would strongly advise anyone going there to arrive at the Wukesong stadium well before of the game -- and I do mean well before . Just an estimate, but given current security concerns, I'd say no later than two hours before game time if you want to see the first inning. The stadium is located at the subway station of the same name on the east-west line. It's about 4-5 stops west of Tiananmen Square. There will probably be buses but given the traffic I'd avoid them. The subways can be very, very crowded and are often crammed full by the time they get anywhere near downtown, and I'm talking about ordinary non-Olympics times. It's about a 10-minute walk, assuming no large crowd in front of you, from the subway exit to the stadium. Be sure to take the exit that's marked for the stadium, because if you come up at the wrong exit the only way across the street without risking suicide is to go back down into the subway and convince the staff to let you go through the tunnel. I think it's exit B, though the signage isn't great.

                    If anyone's going to be there for all the games, consider buying a subway pass, not individual trip tickets (2 rmb each), so you can go through the electroinic turnstiles that are just being installed. This will save you considerable time in peak periods. There is only one entrance to the stadium grounds, so of course it's a bottleneck. They will inspect every bag and I don't know if they will allow water bottles inside -- I'm just guessing, but I doubt it. Drink up what you bring with you. Don't expect anyone inspecting you to speak a word of English. Smile and nod a lot. There is no afternoon sun in the stands behind home plate, and no shade in the bleachers at any time. The summer sun can be HOT and I'd recommend sunblock, sunglasses and a hat. Beijing can also be quite dusty. There are no bad seats or blocked views, but the plastic seats in the bleachers are narrow for wide-bottomed foreigners. The only toilets are port-a-potties that you pass on the way in. Use them early as there aren't many for a 12,000-seat facility. Always carry plenty of tissue and sanitary handwipes with you.

                    If prices are the same, you'll pay 20 rmb (about $2.50) for a hot dog in the stands, same for a beer or coke. Water is 10 rmb. I would not advise carrying significant amounts of cash around in Beijing, and strongly suggest photocopying travel documents and carrying those. Leave valuables and original documents in a hotel safe desposit box, the one the cashier unlocks for you, not the one in your clothes closet. Also, look up the emergency phone number at whatever your national embassy is and carry it with you all the time. Hopefully you'll never need it.

                    Otherwise, enjoy the games!
                    You make it sound like Beijing is a terrible and criminal place.

                    Comment

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