Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Yu Darvish

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #16
    I also understand that the Nippon Ham Fighters are alone in NPB in earning profits for the owner. No doubt that posting Darvish in the next few years would reduce or eliminate those margins. And that would be bad for business.

    Comment


    • #17
      Originally posted by Agente Libre View Post
      But isn't that basically what the NPB has become? MLB might not have as many Japanese fourth outfielders and relief pitchers as it would if Japan was truly open for business like the D.R., etc., but MLB seems to have almost all of the superstar-caliber Japanese players (with Darvish an exception).
      That shows a definite lack of understanding about Japanese baseball. What about Nobuhiko Matsunaka, Kazumi Saitoh, Tomoaki Kanemoto, Hitoki Iwase and others who are far bigger stars than the middle relievers who come to the US? The top Japanese free agents sometimes come to the US and sometimes stay in Japan. Some do both - Hiroki Kuroda could have signed with a MLB team for 2007 but decided to stay in Japan, then try his luck in the USA in 2008.

      Japanese baseball unfortunately is losing lots of stars to the US - I hate to imagine what happens if it gets as bad as the Dominican Republic. Of course, the situation will probably be even worse for Cuban baseball if the political circumstances change and agents rob the island of all its talent.

      Comment


      • #18
        Originally posted by Agente Libre View Post
        But isn't that basically what the NPB has become? MLB might not have as many Japanese fourth outfielders and relief pitchers as it would if Japan was truly open for business like the D.R., etc., but MLB seems to have almost all of the superstar-caliber Japanese players (with Darvish an exception).
        Actually some of Japanese MLB players were mediocre players back in NPB.
        So Taguchi, Takashi Saito, Hideki Okajima, Tomokazu Ohka, Akinori Otsuka were far from superstar in Japan.

        In case of Takashi Saito, he had no option but to come to MLB. Because when he was released by Yokohama Baystars, there was no NPB team which offered him.
        Tomokazu Ohka spent most of his career as a NPB-minor-leaguer in Japan.
        Last edited by Tetsuwan; 03-28-2008, 11:57 AM.

        Comment


        • #19
          Originally posted by Tetsuwan View Post
          Actually some of Japanese MLB players were mediocre players back in NPB.
          So Taguchi, Takashi Saito, Hideki Okajima, Tomokazu Ohka, Akinori Otsuka were far from superstar in Japan.

          In case of Takashi Saito, he had no option but to come to MLB. Because when he was released by Yokohama Baystars, there was no NPB team which offered him.
          Tomokazu Ohka spent most of his career as a NPB-minor-leaguer in Japan.
          That's much more true of pitchers than hitters, and I wonder if it isn't attributable to the usage/training patterns and methods used in the majors versus Japan. Those pitchers may well have benefitted from not throwing hard every day and/or not being used as hard as they often are in NPB. As for hitters, even Taguchi was a multi-time all-star in Japan, so I think your argument in that regard is rather weak.
          Seen on a bumper sticker: If only closed minds came with closed mouths.
          Some minds are like concrete--thoroughly mixed up and permanently set.
          A Lincoln: I don't think much of a man who is not wiser today than he was yesterday.

          Comment


          • #20
            I am correct in thinking that Darvish is not a native Japanese name?
            Sounds more like Tibetan/Nepalese/Indian to my provincial ears...
            "I throw him four wide ones, then try to pick him off first base." - Preacher Roe on pitching to Musial

            Comment


            • #21
              His father is Iranian and his mother Japanese
              Seen on a bumper sticker: If only closed minds came with closed mouths.
              Some minds are like concrete--thoroughly mixed up and permanently set.
              A Lincoln: I don't think much of a man who is not wiser today than he was yesterday.

              Comment


              • #22
                Ah, thanks for the info.
                At least I was headed towards the right part of the world with my guesses, if not quite making it all the way.
                "I throw him four wide ones, then try to pick him off first base." - Preacher Roe on pitching to Musial

                Comment


                • #23
                  Does anyone think that the NPB & its Players Association would subscribe to the idea that increasing or removing its limit of Foreign Players would eliminate their need for nine years of retention rights?

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    NPB could use more foreign players, and it might allow the doors to open a little more. However, the NPB powers that be are old men very steeped in the Japanese way of tradition--and, traditionally, NPB has sold itself as a uniquely Japanese version of the sport. Going with more foreigners would require a change in that mindset, and I'm afraid it will either take many years for that to happen, or, perhaps more likely, a crisis (due to loss of talent, perhaps?). The players would like to see the gates to MLB more accessible, but since their union is exceptionally tame by American union standards, there's little chance they'll strike over the issue.
                    Seen on a bumper sticker: If only closed minds came with closed mouths.
                    Some minds are like concrete--thoroughly mixed up and permanently set.
                    A Lincoln: I don't think much of a man who is not wiser today than he was yesterday.

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      Originally posted by jalbright View Post
                      NPB could use more foreign players, and it might allow the doors to open a little more. However, the NPB powers that be are old men very steeped in the Japanese way of tradition--and, traditionally, NPB has sold itself as a uniquely Japanese version of the sport. Going with more foreigners would require a change in that mindset, and I'm afraid it will either take many years for that to happen, or, perhaps more likely, a crisis (due to loss of talent, perhaps?).
                      Do you know if the Toyo Carp still operate their Academy in the Dominican Republic? Are there other Japanese baseball Academies run by NPB teams eslewhere? It doesn't seem like it's worth it just to develop a handful of players, but maybe the NPB Teams find it more tolerable to have Foreign players that play and train the Japanese way.

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        There are still a few Japanese academies in the D.R., and they have a fairly miserable reputation down there, although the whole situation is basically lose-lose for the Japanese: The best players want to sign with MLB, and mostly view the Japanese teams as a worst-case fallback.

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          Originally posted by jalbright View Post
                          That's much more true of pitchers than hitters, and I wonder if it isn't attributable to the usage/training patterns and methods used in the majors versus Japan. Those pitchers may well have benefitted from not throwing hard every day and/or not being used as hard as they often are in NPB. As for hitters, even Taguchi was a multi-time all-star in Japan, so I think your argument in that regard is rather weak.
                          Well, my point was that not all of Japanese MLB players were great at Japan, which is apparently true.
                          Just ask random baseball fans in Japan if they know who So Taguchi is. Probably, most of them will be like .

                          Another factor is that most of Japanese players come to MLB when their ability is over the hill.
                          Even though, So Taguchi was a regular member at Orix. When he decided to go to MLB, he had already passed his prime and was having hard time against the challenge of youngsters in the team.

                          Comment


                          • #28
                            Originally posted by Tetsuwan View Post
                            Just ask random baseball fans in Japan if they know who So Taguchi is. Probably, most of them will be like .
                            .
                            Actually, Taguchi was even more famous as a personality than as a baseball player. He was a noted space cadet, at least by Japanese standards, and was always doing something odd to draw attention to himself. Certain elements of the Japanese media ate it up and reported it in great detail.
                            Seen on a bumper sticker: If only closed minds came with closed mouths.
                            Some minds are like concrete--thoroughly mixed up and permanently set.
                            A Lincoln: I don't think much of a man who is not wiser today than he was yesterday.

                            Comment


                            • #29
                              A lot of Japanese fans are unhappy with their stars going to the MLB. I have been telling friends that I like seeing them on the Big Stage, that it is where the best belong.

                              However, I am a Fighters fan and would hate to lose Darvish. But I would hate losing him to the Yomiuri Giants even worse. That is what happened with our star first baseman Ogasawara.

                              So, let us keep him a few years. Then, when Hillman has had time to turn the Royals around, I wouldn't mind seeing him go to that club.

                              I guess the long and short of it for me is that, if we have to lose a star, I would like to get young talent for my team or another star. As a fan, it just doesn't mean that much if the owners get a big check.

                              But that is not the system now and it is unlikely to change.

                              Ed

                              Comment


                              • #30
                                Originally posted by Edo View Post
                                A lot of Japanese fans are unhappy with their stars going to the MLB.

                                Ed
                                That is kinda obvious. No-one likes losing their best talents.
                                MySpace Codes

                                Comment

                                Ad Widget

                                Collapse
                                Working...
                                X